Biographical

Portrait of Dan Haren

Dan Haren PCubs

Cubs Player Cards | Cubs Team Audit | Cubs Depth Chart

2018 Projections (Preseason PECOTA - seasonal age 37)
IP ERA WHIP SO W L SV WARP
35.3 5.54 1.39 27 2 2 0 -0.2
Birth Date9-17-1980
Height6' 5"
Weight215 lbs
Age38 years, 0 months, 3 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
1.42014
2.02015
2016
2017
-0.22018
+proj
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
2003 SLN MLB 14 14 72.7 3 7 0 84 22 43 9 .258 99 10.4 2.7 1.1 5.3 42% .311 .285 1.46 4.51 5.08 106 5.64 118.3 0.1
2004 SLN MLB 14 5 46.0 3 3 0 45 17 32 4 .261 93 8.8 3.3 0.8 6.3 47% .293 .259 1.35 3.92 4.50 105 5.50 113.5 0.1
2005 OAK MLB 34 34 217.0 14 12 0 212 53 163 26 .264 98 8.8 2.2 1.1 6.8 47% .287 .246 1.22 3.91 3.73 88 3.86 83.1 4.0
2006 OAK MLB 34 34 223.0 14 13 0 224 45 176 31 .261 99 9.0 1.8 1.3 7.1 45% .289 .249 1.21 4.15 4.12 80 3.38 68.9 5.9
2007 OAK MLB 34 34 222.7 15 9 0 214 55 192 24 .266 92 8.6 2.2 1.0 7.8 45% .287 .251 1.21 3.76 3.07 80 2.82 58.3 7.1
2008 ARI MLB 33 33 216.0 16 8 0 204 40 206 19 .258 99 8.5 1.7 0.8 8.6 45% .303 .230 1.13 2.97 3.33 71 2.84 60.5 6.5
2009 ARI MLB 33 33 229.3 14 10 0 192 38 223 27 .259 99 7.5 1.5 1.1 8.8 44% .267 .218 1.00 3.18 3.14 72 2.65 56.9 7.5
2010 ANA 0 14 14 94.0 5 4 0 84 25 75 8 .256 99 8.0 2.4 0.8 7.2 41% .274 .239 1.16 3.42 2.87 87 3.59 81.1 1.8
2010 ARI 0 21 21 141.0 7 8 0 161 29 141 23 .268 96 10.3 1.9 1.5 9.0 42% .336 .283 1.35 3.90 4.60 85 3.46 78.1 3.0
2011 ANA MLB 35 34 238.3 16 10 0 211 33 192 20 .260 97 8.0 1.2 0.8 7.3 45% .272 .230 1.02 3.01 3.17 80 2.93 68.1 6.0
2012 ANA MLB 30 30 176.7 12 13 0 190 38 142 28 .262 95 9.7 1.9 1.4 7.2 41% .302 .279 1.29 4.19 4.33 95 3.92 89.7 2.6
2013 WAS MLB 31 30 169.7 10 14 1 179 31 151 28 .255 104 9.5 1.6 1.5 8.0 39% .302 .269 1.24 4.05 4.67 95 3.66 87.6 2.6
2014 LAN MLB 32 32 186.0 13 11 0 183 36 145 27 .253 97 8.9 1.7 1.3 7.0 43% .277 .270 1.18 4.06 4.02 101 4.23 103.8 1.4
2015 CHN 0 11 11 58.3 4 2 0 58 13 44 10 .260 97 8.9 2.0 1.5 6.8 30% .273 .279 1.22 4.60 4.01 112 4.39 102.6 0.5
2015 MIA 0 21 21 129.0 7 7 0 116 25 88 21 .260 91 8.1 1.7 1.5 6.1 34% .248 .267 1.09 4.65 3.42 110 4.12 96.1 1.5
2010 TOT MLB 35 35 235.0 12 12 0 245 54 216 31 .263 97 9.4 2.1 1.2 8.3 42% .311 .266 1.27 3.70 3.91 86 3.51 79.3 4.8
2015 TOT MLB 32 32 187.3 11 9 0 174 38 132 31 .260 93 8.4 1.8 1.5 6.3 33% .256 .271 1.13 4.63 3.60 111 4.20 98.2 2.0
CareerMLB3913802419.7153131123575002013305.260978.81.91.17.543%.288.2531.183.773.75883.4376.353.1

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
2001 NWJ A- 12 8 52.3 3 3 1 47 8 57 6 .000 8.1 1.4 1.0 9.8 0% -.577 .000 1.05 3.18 3.10 0 0.00 0.0
2002 PEO A 14 14 101.7 7 3 0 89 12 89 6 .000 7.9 1.1 0.5 7.9 0% .286 .000 0.99 2.66 1.95 0 0.00 0.0
2002 POT A+ 14 14 92.0 3 6 0 90 19 82 8 .000 8.8 1.9 0.8 8.0 0% .303 .000 1.18 3.21 3.62 0 0.00 0.0
2003 SLN MLB 14 14 72.7 3 7 0 84 22 43 9 .258 99 10.4 2.7 1.1 5.3 42% .311 .285 1.46 4.51 5.08 106 5.64 118.3
2003 TEN AA 8 8 55.0 6 0 0 36 6 49 2 .000 5.9 1.0 0.3 8.0 0% .225 .000 0.76 2.14 0.82 0 0.00 0.0
2003 MEM AAA 8 8 45.7 2 1 0 50 8 35 6 .000 9.8 1.6 1.2 6.9 0% .306 .000 1.27 4.26 4.92 0 0.00 0.0
2004 SLN MLB 14 5 46.0 3 3 0 45 17 32 4 .261 93 8.8 3.3 0.8 6.3 47% .293 .259 1.35 3.92 4.50 105 5.50 113.5
2004 MEM AAA 21 21 128.0 11 4 0 137 33 150 19 .000 9.6 2.3 1.3 10.5 0% .351 .000 1.33 3.93 4.15 0 0.00 0.0
2005 OAK MLB 34 34 217.0 14 12 0 212 53 163 26 .264 98 8.8 2.2 1.1 6.8 47% .287 .246 1.22 3.91 3.73 88 3.86 83.1
2006 OAK MLB 34 34 223.0 14 13 0 224 45 176 31 .261 99 9.0 1.8 1.3 7.1 45% .289 .249 1.21 4.15 4.12 80 3.38 68.9
2007 OAK MLB 34 34 222.7 15 9 0 214 55 192 24 .266 92 8.6 2.2 1.0 7.8 45% .287 .251 1.21 3.76 3.07 80 2.82 58.3
2008 ARI MLB 33 33 216.0 16 8 0 204 40 206 19 .258 99 8.5 1.7 0.8 8.6 45% .303 .230 1.13 2.97 3.33 71 2.84 60.5
2009 ARI MLB 33 33 229.3 14 10 0 192 38 223 27 .259 99 7.5 1.5 1.1 8.8 44% .267 .218 1.00 3.18 3.14 72 2.65 56.9
2010 ANA MLB 14 14 94.0 5 4 0 84 25 75 8 .256 99 8.0 2.4 0.8 7.2 41% .274 .239 1.16 3.42 2.87 87 3.59 81.1
2010 ARI MLB 21 21 141.0 7 8 0 161 29 141 23 .268 96 10.3 1.9 1.5 9.0 42% .336 .283 1.35 3.90 4.60 85 3.46 78.1
2011 ANA MLB 35 34 238.3 16 10 0 211 33 192 20 .260 97 8.0 1.2 0.8 7.3 45% .272 .230 1.02 3.01 3.17 80 2.93 68.1
2012 ANA MLB 30 30 176.7 12 13 0 190 38 142 28 .262 95 9.7 1.9 1.4 7.2 41% .302 .279 1.29 4.19 4.33 95 3.92 89.7
2012 SBR A+ 1 1 5.0 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 .281 80 12.6 0.0 0.0 3.6 39% .389 .297 1.40 3.00 3.60 0 0.00 0.0
2013 WAS MLB 31 30 169.7 10 14 1 179 31 151 28 .255 104 9.5 1.6 1.5 8.0 39% .302 .269 1.24 4.05 4.67 95 3.66 87.6
2014 LAN MLB 32 32 186.0 13 11 0 183 36 145 27 .253 97 8.9 1.7 1.3 7.0 43% .277 .270 1.18 4.06 4.02 101 4.23 103.8
2015 CHN MLB 11 11 58.3 4 2 0 58 13 44 10 .260 97 8.9 2.0 1.5 6.8 30% .273 .279 1.22 4.60 4.01 112 4.39 102.6
2015 MIA MLB 21 21 129.0 7 7 0 116 25 88 21 .260 91 8.1 1.7 1.5 6.1 34% .248 .267 1.09 4.65 3.42 110 4.12 96.1

Plate Discipline

YEAR PITCHES ZONE_RT SWING_RT CONTACT_RT Z_SWING_RT O_SWING_RT Z_CONTACT_RT O_CONTACT_RT SW_STRK_RT
2008 3105 0.4899 0.4663 0.7728 0.6016 0.3365 0.8842 0.5816 0.2272
2009 3482 0.4914 0.4518 0.7540 0.5868 0.3213 0.8516 0.5817 0.2460
2010 3716 0.4804 0.4704 0.7649 0.6112 0.3402 0.8634 0.6012 0.2351
2011 3748 0.4693 0.4789 0.7760 0.6259 0.3489 0.8619 0.6398 0.2240
2012 2838 0.4736 0.4514 0.7861 0.6138 0.3052 0.8703 0.6338 0.2139
2013 2775 0.4728 0.4732 0.7883 0.6349 0.3281 0.8667 0.6521 0.2117
2014 3067 0.4786 0.4483 0.8218 0.6022 0.3071 0.8937 0.6925 0.1782
2015 2896 0.4734 0.4416 0.8428 0.6098 0.2905 0.8995 0.7359 0.1572
Career256270.47880.46090.78650.61050.32370.87290.63710.2135

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2014-05-08 2014-05-12 DTD 4 4 - Low Back Tightness - -
2013-06-23 2013-07-08 15-DL 15 14 Right Shoulder Inflammation - -
2013-05-14 2013-05-14 DTD 0 0 - Ankle Soreness - -
2012-07-04 2012-07-22 15-DL 18 14 - Low Back Stiffness - -
2012-05-08 2012-05-14 DTD 6 5 - Low Back Stiffness - -
2011-09-21 2011-09-21 DTD 0 0 Left Wrist Contusion Batted Ball - -
2011-07-20 2011-07-20 DTD 0 0 - Low Back Stiffness - -
2011-06-01 2011-06-07 DTD 6 5 Low Back Spasms -
2010-07-26 2010-07-26 DTD 0 0 Right Forearm Contusion Batted Ball -
2009-08-01 2009-08-01 DTD 0 0 Hip Soreness -
2008-08-01 2008-08-05 DTD 4 4 Right Thigh Spasms Hamstring -
2008-04-29 2008-04-29 DTD 0 0 General Medical Respiratory Flu -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2015 LAN $10,000,000
2015 MIA $
2014 LAN $10,000,000
2013 WAS $13,000,000
2012 ANA $12,750,000
2011 ANA $12,750,000
2010 ARI $8,250,000
2009 ARI $7,500,000
2008 ARI $4,000,000
2007 OAK $2,200,000
2006 OAK $500,000
2005 OAK $323,500
YearsDescriptionSalary
11 yrPrevious$81,273,500
11 yrTotal$81,273,500

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
10 y 154 dGreg Landry1 year/$10M (2014), 2015 option

Details
  • 1 year/$10M (2014), plus 2015 vesting option. Signed by LA Dodgers as a free agent 11/25/13. 2015 player option worth $10M with 180 innings pitched in 2014 (increases to $11M player option if traded in 2014). Performance bonuses: $0.25M each for 24, 27, 30 starts. $0.5M for 32 starts. $0.25M each for 150, 160, 170 innings. $0.5M each for 180, 190 innings. If option vests, same package of performance bonuses is available for 2015. Haren exercised 2015 option 10/30/14. Acquired by Miami in trade from LA Dodgers 12/10/14 (Dodgers to pay 2015 salary). Acquired by Chicago Cubs in trade from Miami 7/31/15. Retired 10/15.
  • 1 year/$13M (2013). Signed by Washington as a free agent 12/4/12.
  • 4 years/$44.75M (2009-12), plus 2013 club option. 09:$7.5M, 10:$8.25M, 11:$12.75M, 12:$12.75M, 13:$15.5M club option, $3.5M buyout. Acquired by LA Angels in trade from Arizona 7/25/10. LA Angels declined 2013 option 11/2/12.
  • 4 years/$12.65M (2006-09), plus 2010 club option. Signed extension with Oakland 9/05. $0.2M signing bonus, 06:$0.5M, 07:$2.2M, 08:$4M, 09:$5.5M, 10:$6.75M club option, $0.25M buyout. Total guarantee may be reduced to $9.5M if Haren does not qualify as a Super 2 after 2005 season. 2009 salary may increase by $0.75M based on performance. 2010 option may increase by $1M based on performance. Option may vest based on IP. Award bonus: $50,000 for All-Star. Acquired by Arizona in trade from Oakland 12/14/07.
  • 1 year/$0.3235M (2005). Acquired by Oakland in trade from St. Louis 12/04. Signed by Oakland 2/05.
  • 1 year (2004). Optioned to Triple-A by St. Louis 3/04. Recalled 7/04. Optioned to Triple-A 8/04. Recalled 8/04.
  • 1 year (2003). Contract purchased by St. Louis 6/03.
  • Drafted by St. Louis 2001 (2-72) (Pepperdine).

2018 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
90o 3.4 2.5 0 8 8 48.8 45 14 35 9 .247 1.20 4.60 4.79 2.9 0.3
80o 2.9 2.4 0 8 8 43.5 42 13 31 8 .259 1.28 5.01 5.23 0.6 0.1
70o 2.6 2.3 0 7 7 39.7 41 13 28 8 .268 1.34 5.32 5.56 -0.8 -0.1
60o 2.3 2.2 0 6 6 36.6 39 12 26 8 .276 1.40 5.58 5.84 -1.8 -0.2
50o 2.1 2.1 0 6 6 33.7 37 12 24 7 .284 1.45 5.83 6.1 -2.5 -0.3
40o 1.9 2 0 5 5 30.9 35 11 22 7 .291 1.50 6.09 6.37 -3.2 -0.3
30o 1.6 1.9 0 5 5 27.9 33 10 20 7 .299 1.56 6.36 6.67 -3.7 -0.4
20o 1.4 1.8 0 4 4 24.6 31 10 18 6 .308 1.63 6.69 7.02 -4.2 -0.5
10o 1.1 1.5 0 3 3 20.1 27 8 14 5 .321 1.73 7.16 7.51 -4.4 -0.5
Weighted Mean2.12.106633.13611247.2821.445.806.07-2.4-0.3

Preseason Long-Term Forecast (Beyond the 2018 Projections)

Playing time estimates are based on performance, not Depth Charts.
Year Age W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR GB% BABIP WHIP ERA DRA H/9 BB/9 K/9 HR/9 WARP
20193881302929179192601293835.3001.415.886.499.63.06.51.9-1.6
20203981302929180192601293835.2991.405.856.459.63.06.51.9-1.6
20214071202727159171521133335.2981.405.866.469.72.96.41.9-1.4
20224171202626152164501063235.2981.415.936.549.73.06.31.9-1.5
2023426100212112313542852635.3011.446.006.629.93.16.21.9-1.3
2024434701515899931621935.3031.466.086.7110.03.16.21.9-1.1
20254458017179910934682135.3041.456.046.669.93.16.21.9-1.1
2026454701515879630591935.3011.446.066.699.93.16.12.0-1.0
2027464601414819028551835.3021.466.116.7410.03.16.12.0-1.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index 81)

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend
1 91 Whitey Ford 1966 4.07
2 90 Ted Lilly 2013 5.87
3 89 Jon Lieber 2007 5.08
4 88 Paul Byrd 2008 4.80
5 88 Colby Lewis 2017 0.00 DNP
6 88 Dennis Martinez 1991 2.84
7 88 Brett Tomko 2010 0.00 DNP
8 88 David Wells 2000 4.51
9 87 Don Sutton 1982 3.46
10 87 Bret Saberhagen 2001 6.60
11 87 Ron Guidry 1988 4.50
12 86 Esteban Loaiza 2009 0.00 DNP
13 86 Jeremy Guthrie 2016 0.00 DNP
14 85 Jim Kaat 1976 3.76
15 85 Bruce Chen 2014 7.45
16 85 Freddy Garcia 2014 0.00 DNP
17 85 Mike Mussina 2006 4.01
18 85 Preacher Roe 1953 4.47
19 85 Hal Brown 1962 4.97 DNP
20 85 Ed Whitson 1992 0.00 DNP
21 84 Woody Williams 2004 4.41
22 84 Bronson Arroyo 2014 4.19
23 84 Harry Brecheen 1952 3.19
24 84 Carl Pavano 2013 0.00 DNP
25 84 Bert Blyleven 1988 5.56
26 84 Rick Reed 2002 4.26
27 84 Jim Bunning 1969 4.11
28 83 Orlando Hernandez 2003 0.00 DNP
29 83 Bartolo Colon 2010 0.00 DNP
30 83 Kyle Lohse 2016 12.54
31 83 Sonny Siebert 1974 4.44
32 83 Mike Scott 1992 0.00 DNP
33 83 Bob Tewksbury 1998 4.98
34 83 Livan Hernandez 2012 6.42
35 83 Kevin Millwood 2012 4.81
36 82 Chris Capuano 2016 4.12
37 82 Rudy May 1982 3.65
38 82 Wandy Rodriguez 2016 0.00 DNP
39 82 Jack Morris 1992 4.26
40 81 Joe Nuxhall 1966 4.92
41 81 Phil Niekro 1976 3.86
42 81 John Lackey 2016 3.54
43 81 Jerry Koosman 1980 4.40
44 81 Chris Young 2016 6.39
45 81 John Burkett 2002 4.84
46 81 Ryan Dempster 2014 0.00 DNP
47 81 Erik Bedard 2016 0.00 DNP
48 80 Joe Dobson 1954 6.75
49 80 Pedro Martinez 2009 3.63
50 80 Hiroki Kuroda 2012 3.52
51 80 Vern Law 1967 5.32
52 80 Tom Seaver 1982 6.06
53 80 Harvey Haddix 1963 3.41
54 80 Mike Hampton 2010 0.00
55 80 Kevin Tapani 2001 4.97
56 80 Dizzy Trout 1952 4.28
57 80 Randy Wolf 2014 5.96
58 79 Dick Donovan 1965 5.96
59 79 Early Wynn 1957 4.76
60 79 Earl Wilson 1972 0.00 DNP
61 79 Mark Hendrickson 2011 5.73
62 79 Virgil Trucks 1954 2.96
63 79 Al Leiter 2003 4.13
64 79 Sam Jones 1963 9.82
65 79 Connie Johnson 1960 0.00 DNP
66 79 Darren Oliver 2008 3.00
67 79 Luis Tiant 1978 3.39
68 79 Jason Schmidt 2010 0.00 DNP
69 78 Bill Hands 1977 0.00 DNP
70 78 Orel Hershiser 1996 5.02
71 78 Elmer Dessens 2008 22.50
72 78 Mark Langston 1998 6.20
73 78 Doyle Alexander 1988 4.79
74 78 Bryn Smith 1993 8.80
75 77 Jim Bibby 1982 0.00 DNP
76 77 Charlie Leibrandt 1994 0.00 DNP
77 77 Mickey Lolich 1978 1.56
78 77 Brian Moehler 2009 5.82
79 77 Kenshin Kawakami 2012 0.00 DNP
80 77 Rick Reuschel 1986 4.42
81 77 Fergie Jenkins 1980 4.09
82 77 Jeff Fassero 2000 4.98
83 76 Ellis Kinder 1952 3.04
84 76 Johnny Sain 1955 6.12
85 76 Mike Cuellar 1974 3.54
86 76 Eric Stults 2017 0.00 DNP
87 76 Tim Wakefield 2004 5.78
88 76 Ryan Vogelsong 2015 5.07
89 76 Chuck Finley 2000 4.42
90 76 Joe Hesketh 1996 0.00 DNP
91 76 Jimmy Key 1998 4.42
92 75 Vic Raschi 1956 0.00 DNP
93 75 Aaron Harang 2015 5.22
94 75 Chan Ho Park 2010 5.51
95 75 Dennis Leonard 1988 0.00 DNP
96 75 Don Mossi 1966 0.00 DNP
97 75 Danny Darwin 1993 3.65
98 75 Ed Lopat 1955 4.58
99 75 Aaron Sele 2007 6.04
100 75 A.J. Burnett 2014 5.14

Platoon

SORT_FIELD PLATOON AVG OBP SLG TAv

Definition of multi-year splits

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2016 Haren did not initially want to play in 2015, preferring to retire and stay with his family on the west coast, but the Marlins convinced him to lace up the cleats one more time, then traded him to the Cubs once they finished their annual realization of mediocrity. Haren ate innings for five different teams over the last four years, and his results were... They were. They existed. You can't deny that. As his strikeout rate eroded, he relied more heavily on his history of inducing soft contact in the air. It made him a perfectly acceptable pitcher: 3.3 WARP in four years sums him up as well as any single number can sum up any single person. While he's still just 35, his velocity did a swan dive the last two years, resulting in an 87 mph fastball last season; according to Brooks Baseball, the only 2015 righties who threw at least 200 four-seamers or sinkers and averaged a lower velocity than Haren were Jered Weaver, Doug Fister and Brad Ziegler, the latter of whom throws underhand.

But Haren deserves better treatment in this, his final send-off. He was above-average for the A's from 2005 to 2007, instantly replacing the production of Mark Mulder in what turned out to be a massively lopsided trade for Oakland. Upon his next trade, this time to Arizona, he took another step forward, producing three excellent seasons in his next four years split between the Diamondbacks and Angels: He ranked seventh, ninth, 51st and 11th in WARP over those years. Age came for him then, but he's still retiring on his own terms, coming off a 32-start season, not sent packing by injury (he spent a total of 32 days on the disabled list in his career) or sub-replacement pitching into a fretful forced free agency.

2015 It's hard to believe Haren, a Pepperdine alumnus from La Puente, California with a free-flowing head of hair, had never pitched for Los Angeles before 2014. He had a reverse roller coaster season in his Dodgers debut: a 2.03 ERA in his first 31 innings, a 5.64 mark over his next 96, then 2.43 in the final 59. His stuff isn't what it once was (91 mph fastball, fall-off-the-table splitter, sharp cutter): His fastball now tops out at 89 (hence the excellent Twitter handle @ithrow88), his splitter is a little flat, he's relying more and more on his cutter and all the pitches are blending together a little bit. You know that animation that shows five pitches with radically different movement and velocity all issuing from one Yu Darvish release point? Haren's the opposite of that.

Still, teams have done and will do worse for $12.5 million. (Haren hit nearly all the performance incentives in his contract and made an additional $2.5 million on top of his $10 million base.) Haren's 2015 option vested, but we're all stuck here waiting to see if he's going to retire after a mid-winter trade to Los Angeles. You already know, because you live in the future. Lucky dog.

2014 A second consecutive season of a 4+ ERA (and FIP) won't make anyone think Haren is back to his old self, because he’s not. At 33 years old, Haren is his old self, as he failed to crack 180 innings again after surpassing 200 every year from 2005-2011. He can still miss bats (21 percent strikeout rate) and can still pound the zone (4 percent walk rate). But perhaps he’s in the zone too much, with a HR/FB rate well above the league's average that risks undoing an otherwise very good pitcher. Haren was far more effective after returning from a mid-season DL stint, with opponents posting a .636 OPS against him in the second half, and earned himself a potential two-year deal with the Dodgers. If Haren can continue to keep fly balls in the yard at his more representative late-summer rate, he could be a bargain.
2013 Angels GM Jerry DiPoto knew he had some tough decisions to make after the 2012 season, but picking up Dan Haren's $15.5 million option didn't figure to be one of them. Then Haren turned in the worst year of his career. The Angels once bought low on a slumping Haren, but this slumping Haren is much more troubling than the 2010 version shopped by the Diamondbacks. His velocity dropped another mile per hour, continuing a steady five-year decline. Lost fastball velocity forces him to his lesser pitches: Haren threw far more splitters and cutters (66 percent combined) than he did in 2010 (41 percent), when he had more heat. Haren's inability to set up his secondary pitches with a strong fastball allows hitters to sit on them. In 2010, Haren got whiffs on nearly 18 percent of his secondary pitches—in 2012, 12 percent. The Nationals signed Haren for one year, $13 million. There’s buying low, and there’s buying late.
2012 Haren is yet another pitcher who has reinvented himself with a cutter, though he made the transition seamlessly—no exile to Japan or Taiwan, just year after year of 4-WARP pitching. He's been leaking fastball velocity for four years and struggled to command his once-lethal splitter consistently, yet still led the league in strikeouts-to-walk ratio and posted the lowest FIP (fielding independent pitching) of his career. For that, he can thank the cutter, which he threw half the time in 2011, getting strikes on 71 percent of those throws. Jered Weaver got the Cy Young votes, but Haren's defense-independent stats and career-high innings totals made him the staff's co-ace, or better.
2011 As a deadline deal designed to deliver the buyer to October, the Haren trade failed to achieve its intended effect, but to call it a flop would be to overlook the fact that, from the Angels' perspective, the swap was only tangentially about 2010. They locked up a durable top-of-the-rotation talent at a reasonable rate through 2013, and did so without surrendering anything but disposable parts to a trade partner in desperate need of financial relief. Perhaps we’d be flattering ourselves if we speculated that Tony Reagins had scoped Haren’s SIERA before pulling the trigger on the transaction, but the defense-independent metric did predict the pitcher’s post-trade performance much more accurately than his pre-trade ERA. The SoCal native rewarded the Angels’ faith in his peripherals by finishing strong for the first time since 2005, despite logging a career-high 235 frames and running his streak of consecutive seasons with at least 216 innings pitched to six.
2010 Haren turned in his fifth straight season of 33-plus starts and 216-plus innings, all with a fine ERA for a desert-dweller and a league-leading strikeout/walk ratio just shy of 6.0. That he has not yet become a household name serves as a testament to the small markets in which he has played, not the magnitude of his talent. On pure stuff, durability, control, command, track record, age and contract status, one would be hard-pressed to find five more valuable pitchers in the entire sport. One off-key note on the subject of his durability: since 2006, when Haren posted a 2.63 ERA down the stretch, Haren has made 34 August and September starts, posting a 5.18 ERA while allowing 263 hits and 33 home runs in 217 1/3 innings. Normally, small-sample breakdowns such as these can be misleading, but in Haren's case there might be something to the idea that his early-season workloads could be better managed to avoid fatigue at the end of the year.
2009 Once you adjust for park and the lack of a designated hitter, Dan Haren was almost exactly the same pitcher he was in 2007—merely one of the better pitchers in baseball. Whether or not the deal that brought him to Arizona was a good deal for the Diamondbacks is still an open issue. A critic might note that nearly every prospect they sent to Oakland looked mighty good in the minors, while Haren didn't pitch his team into the postseason and looked downright tired by the time August rolled around. One has to wonder if staying healthy has almost worked against him, as he hasn't missed a turn for four years while tossing almost 900 innings in the process. Color us a bit concerned.
2008 Oakland's rebuilding process began in December with the trade of Haren to Arizona for a cornucopia of prospects. Oakland definitely sold high; Haren is generally seen as one of the top starting pitchers in baseball, but he's run out of gas towards the end of each of the last two seasons, and pitching in McAfee Coliseum masked his biggest weakness-giving up big fly balls. As a big-time home-run park, Arizona's Chase Field could prove to be troublesome for Haren, but pitching in the weaker league and not having to worry about those pesky designated hitters should make it a wash in the end.
2007 If not for J.J. Hardy, Dan Haren would follow Rich Harden in an alphabetical register of 2006 major leaguers, and that`s probably how most fans think of them: Harden, then Haren. But while Harden has totaled 175 innings over the last two seasons, Haren has established himself as one of the more durable starters in the majors, making 34 starts in both seasons. He`s otherwise consistent, too, with 14 wins in each season and virtually identical numbers down the line. Haren has just one weakness: Home runs. Last season only six American League pitchers gave up more dingers than Haren. If he can solve that problem--or get just a few extra dollops of luck--fans will figure out that Haren comes before Harden in the only way that matters.
2005 He's suffered some fits and starts during his call-ups, but this is a pitcher who deserves an extended look in the major league rotation. Haren's a "four-pitch guy" without a truly dominant offering, which means it's possible he might not make the transition to the majors. But, by golly, let him prove it first. You don't post a career 5.37 strikeout-to-walk ratio in the minors by accident. For what it's worth, he looked much better during his 2004 major league look-see than he did in '03. Now that he's in Oakland, Haren will have every opportunity to stick in the rotation on a long-term basis. Don't be shocked if he roughly approximates the quality of Mark Mulder v.2004.
2004 A second-rounder in 2001 out of Pepperdine, Haren has an exceptionally strong minor league profile (solid strikeout rate, 2.78 ERA, 5.9 IUBB), and that certainly augurs well for the coming seasons. Although he struggled to find much consistency in St. Louis this past season, his outstanding numbers on the farm earn him the benefit of the doubt. That he spent only 45 innings at the Triple-A level may have hampered his transition to the highest level. Better days lie ahead, starting with a solid sophomore season.

BP Articles

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BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2015-07-28 18:00:00 (link to chat)Wouldn't going after Dan Haren make sense for the Royals? He shouldn't cost much and his flyball tendencies would be a good fit. Adding Cueto is good...but that rotation is still weak.
(Matt from Cambridge)
It's amazing what the Royal's outfield defense has done for that staff again. I agree that they likely need to go get one more arm but I'm unsure that Haren is it. I would check on Mike Leake or someone in that tier. (Mauricio Rubio)
2015-06-30 19:00:00 (link to chat)Mike, What innings eaters might the Cubs go after at the Deadline? Thanks!
(Steve Trout from Big & Tall Fitting Room)
If you're talking about pure innings eaters and not aces it opens things up a little bit. Jon Niese is the guy who has been linked to a couple of teams, and Bartolo Colon is a logical guy too (although I haven't heard any rumors about him). Thinking of guys on second division teams, it's kind of limited to be honest. The Rockies really don't have anyone obvious. Jorge de la Rosa? Maybe? Diamondbacks don't. They're not really innings eaters but Mat Latos and Dan Haren aren't quite ace material and would probably fit the mold of a non-ace who wouldn't cost a bevy of prospects. (Mike Gianella)
2014-12-18 15:00:00 (link to chat)Craig, do you think we've run into an issue where teams are overvaluing years of control when making deals? The A's dealt Samardijza and Moss for underwhelming returns, but the Dodgers shipped out Heaney for Kendrick. What gives?
(Chris from Seattle)
I do think years of control are playing a big part in the valuation of players, and I do think it's potentially being overvalued. I love Dee Gordon and he's a nice player, but getting more for four years of him than what a guy like Brandon Moss or Jeff Samardzija brought back strikes me as odd (and don't tell me Miguel Rojas was the key there). I know Dan Haren was in that mix as well, but I do think Gordon was the piece Miami focused on.

I know people are thinking that the prospect market is just pretty dry right now with teams wanting to hold on to what they have, and I don't doubt that's the case, but I am surprised a bit at some teams' willingness to give into that market and just sell for what's being offered, especially this early in the offseason. (Craig Goldstein)
2014-05-29 19:30:00 (link to chat)Why does Ben Cherington not want me to start? I'm 19th in SwgStk% and Contact since 2007(next to Kershaw) and pound the strikezone like Dan Haren. Does he not care how weird that is?
(Chris Capuano from Atlanta)
You were mediocre as a starter in the NL West last year and you're about to turn 36. Stay in the pen and prolong your career. (Ben Carsley)
2013-11-22 14:00:00 (link to chat)Thank you for the chat, Doug. Do you see Dan Haren being a solid #4 the next couple of years? Does he have more upside than Bronson Arroyo?
(Dennis from LA)
Haren vs Arroyo is a great example of risk/reward vs relative predictability. Haren has higher upside in theory but also the higher potential to crash, especially considering the injury history. Arroyo is less exciting from the standpoint of expected performance, but you have a better idea of what you're going to get - but his high rates of contact make him a better fit for a smaller ballpark. At least with Arroyo you get the sexiness of the showgirl leg-kick, the beach bro haircut, and the ridiculous array of arm slots that range from straight sidearm to almost over-the-top with minimal adjustment to spine-angle.

On the jukebox: Kyuss, "Mudfly" (Doug Thorburn)
2013-08-08 17:30:00 (link to chat)Mike how would you rank the following(Please not just the way you have them)Parker,Haren,Nova,Leake,,and Tyson Ross.Thanks
(Chesty from New Bern,NC)
I would go Ivan Nova, Mike Leake, Jarrod Parker, Tyson Ross, and Dan Haren for this year. Nova might not be the best of the bunch, but I feel like you have to ride the streak. Leake is "due" to slip, but isn't that bad. Parker is a little too HR prone for my taste. Ross might actually be better, but I'd like to see more before ranking him higher. I don't trust Haren right now. Flashes of brilliance, but the HR tendencies tell me to lay off. (Mike Gianella)
2013-07-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)You wrote about Dan Haren earlier this year during a stretch when he seemed to be doing better. He's regressed since. Have you noticed anything in particular about why he's so homer-happy?
(Dan Rozenson from Washington, DC)
I think he's just leaving the ball over the plate, and he certainly doesn't have the stuff to miss in the zone. (Harry Pavlidis)
2013-07-19 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is Dan Haren worthy of a buy low offer? I'm near the top of the league and could get him for Chris Archer. The points league counts Wins and QS, so being on Washington helps, but Archer clearly has the edge in upside.
(RotoLando from Cloud City)
I don't think Chris Archer is a buy-low price. I love Haren, but that's full price for the kind of risk you're assuming. (Paul Sporer)
2013-07-08 14:00:00 (link to chat)Have you watched Dan Haren at all this season? He's supposed to be back from the DL tonight in Philadelphia, and I'm hoping he's fixed whatever was causing his problems this year. Is he, like Cain, a pitcher who relies on location and has lost his timing?
(jcjohnson from DC)
Haren is somewhat of an enigma - I have never been a fan of his mechanics, particularly the pause in his delivery, but he has defied the odds to repeat his odd timing pattern throughout his career. That said, the back issues have thrown a wrench into his approach, as you can imagine how much tougher it is to find that balance point during the pause with a sore lower back. He has always had spine-tilt, which is a precursor to shoulder injury, but Haren has survived a long time despite the issue. It is possible that his previous inefficiencies are catching up to him, or perhaps he is just outside of his physical peak, but has not been able to find that same magic that allowed him to beat the odds for so long. (Doug Thorburn)
2013-07-08 14:00:00 (link to chat)Why do pitchers like Dan Haren and Jorge de la Rosa pause mid-delivery?
(Frank from Denver)
The classic instruction is to "stop at the top" in order to "find a balance point." But this instruction has always seemed backwards to me - a pitcher only needs to find a balance point if he fails to start the delivery in a balanced position. Sure enough, many pitchers start straight-legged at set up, and the center-of-gravity lowers as they reach maximum lift - for this reason, I prefer that pitchers begin the delivery with some flex in the knees, to find that balance point right from the beginning, and that way there is no need to stop mid-stride and "find" their balance. In addition to making it easier to stabilize balance, this method allows a pitcher to generate momentum from a power position on two feet directly from setup, rather than propel forward out of a stopped position while standing on one leg like a damned flamingo.

On the jukebox: Thrice, "Cold Cash and Colder Hearts" (Doug Thorburn)
2013-06-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Do you see Dan Haren turning things around this year?
(wappingliars from NoHo)
:sweats: *gulp* :singletear: No. :( :bawls: (Paul Sporer)
2013-06-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Rest of year: Edwin Jackson, David Phelps, Erasmo Ramirez, Kevin Gausman, Dan Haren.
(LoyalRoyal from KS)
EJax, Eraser, Phelps, Haren, and Gausman. So sad about Haren's demise. (Paul Sporer)
2013-06-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Is Dan Haren droppable? Josh Johnson? This is in a 12 team mixed dynasty league, and Chris Carter is a FA (Berkman's my 1B currently. I know, I know).
(Jim Clancy from Exhibition Stadium)
Yes, at this point, I think Haren is droppable in non-K:BB leagues in favor of pitchers that you could stream off the waiver wire in a 12-team mixed league. If your league does count K:BB, though, I might be inclined to hang on, because he'll contribute in that aspect regardless of his other struggles. I'd drop Haren before Johnson, just on a gut feeling of JJ having a better chance of turning things around. (Daniel Rathman)
2013-05-10 14:00:00 (link to chat)Can you recall any pitcher with extremely ugly mechanics that succeeded for a long time?
(BobcatBaseball from Athens, OH)
Great question, and I have been spinning names throughout the chat to come up with a good answer. The key is the "succeeded for a long time" part of the question - some guys can succeed for a little while with poor mechanics, but they are usually caught by injury or poor performance, as rough mechanics have functional implications. Juan Marichal had awful balance, so he might qualify. Dan Haren has had poor posture and a ridiculous pause in his delivery throughout his career, but I wouldn't go so far as to call his delivery "extremely ugly." Yovani Gallardo could enter the discussion if he continues to pitch moderately well despite F grade mechanics. The list is short and undistinguished. (Doug Thorburn)
2013-04-16 20:00:00 (link to chat)Is it a good time to sell high on Dexter Fowler? I need pitching and targeting guys like Dan Haren in a 1 for 1 trade. Good idea?
(RC from PDX)
Bad idea jeans. Fowler can take that next step forward this year and Haren is a huge risk. But if you aim higher, then sure. (Bret Sayre)
2013-04-10 20:00:00 (link to chat)MG What's going on? In a yahoo league rotisserie standard 8 team league. I really need to make a couple of adjustments. Need to add another pitcher and solid bar to this line up. This league is tough with trades! Who should we ditch and is there anyone we should be tracking or picking up? Here is the squad, 1. (6) Albert Pujols 1B 2. (11) Joe Mauer C,1B 3. (22) Jacoby Ellsbury OF 4. (27) Evan Longoria 3B 5. (38) Matt Holliday OF 6. (43) Cliff Lee SP 7. (54) Shin-Soo Choo OF 8. (59) Jose Altuve 2B 9. (70) Jimmy Rollins SS 10. (75) Roy Halladay SP 11. (86) Huston Street RP 12. (91) Addison Reed RP 13. (102) Anthony Rizzo 1B 14. (107) Jason Grilli RP 15. (118) Tim Lincecum SP 16. (123) Alex Gordon OF 17. (134) Carlos Marmol RP 18. (139) Dan Haren SP 19. (150) Kenley Jansen RP 20. (155) Rickie Weeks 2B 21. (166) Alejandro De Aza OF 22. (171) J.P. Arencibia C Guys who are available. FYI Materson, ziti, e Santana, pettitte Crisp, wells, m Saunders, carpenter, werth
(coach53 from Ct)
Hey Coach

Without knowing what the rules are regarding how deep your reserve lists are and what your free agent pool looks like it's difficult to offer specific advice. Your roster looks strong, but 8-team mixed probably has a lot of rosters that look like this. Dan Haren and Tim Lincecum seem like players that you should be upgrading on. Feel free to drop Carlos Marmol, and as much as I love Kenley Jansen if there's a closer out there, get him; in an 8-team league you shouldn't be speculating on future saves but getting saves here and now. The free agents you list don't look particularly great which - again - makes me wonder how deep your reserve lists are. (Mike Gianella)
2013-04-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)What do you make of the early season performances by Matt Cain, Gio Gonzalez, and Dan Haren?
(Garcia from Ft. Worth)
Haren worries me the most of the three because some of it had already been documented heading into the season. Maybe it's just confirmation bias that I didn't expect him to be good and I expected the others to, but even with what seems to be a small return of his velocity, I'm concerned because of recent body of work. (Zachary Levine)
2013-04-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)Does Dan Haren rebound this year? Why is he now so susceptible to the long ball? Thanks...
(LoyalRoyal from Kansas)
I would think so. The NL is easier, as you get to face pitchers a couple or three times a game. Re. the HR issues ... His HR problems early this year aren't something I'd read much in to. But, in general, guys who lose velocity can't make as many mistakes over the plate as they once did. Haren is crafty and adjusts, but mistakes happen. (Harry Pavlidis)
2013-02-26 14:00:00 (link to chat)Which teams do you feel had the best and worst offseason?
(Cole B. from Brooklyn)
I'll take the Nationals for the best and the Diamondbacks for the worst - and it really boils down to Mike Rizzo continuing to operate under the plan of short-term, high-upside deals (like Dan Haren), while Kevin Towers didn't seem to have a coherent strategy. All of us who are baffled by Arizona's revamped outfield might be proven wrong, but it's difficult to see how the D'backs are a better team now than they were in October. (Daniel Rathman)
2013-01-22 13:00:00 (link to chat)What do you expect of Dan Haren this year? Do you think the back issues make him risky?
(Booker T from Vermolusca)
The back issues do make Haren risky, Booker. I'd anticipate him being an average starter or thereabouts. (R.J. Anderson)
2012-12-11 13:00:00 (link to chat)2 proven ML pitchers for 4 prospects with a grand total of 2 ML games. This was NOT a bad deal at all for the Royals, right?
(J3FFR3Y from work)
Well, I think it is, but other reasonable people think it isn't. But I have a real quibble with the framing that you use, and that a lot of people use, to defend this move for the Royals. "Two proven for four unproven" means that, what, no trade of prospects for a veteran can ever be bad? If the Royals had acquired Ervin Santana and Dan Haren for Myers, Starling, Odorizzi and Zimmer a month ago, would it be defensible because prospects fail? Of course not. Obviously, prospects fail. It's part of the math. But the key thing is that there is math and doing the math is enlightening and doing the math suggests this isn't a great move for the Royals, in a vacuum. (It's not a vacuum is maybe a stronger argument.) (Sam Miller)
2012-11-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Dan Straily was dynamite at AA and AAA this year. What, if anything, will limit his success moving forward in the majors.
(Paul from DC)
When I saw Straily I saw a pitchability right-hander with slightly above-average secondary stuff based mostly on deception and total number of weapons than high pitch grades. He mixes his pitches well and throws strikes, and his fastball is a little better than the typical 92 mph heater because it holds its velocity more at the end of its path (as it crossed the plate) than the average fastball. I think Straily is a No. 3 at best, but he's ready to contribute now, and could turn into a poor-man's Dan Haren capable of 200 innings per year. Commanding the fastball and possibly ditching the curveball altogether and sticking with the slider-changeup combo may get him there. (Jason A. Churchill)
2012-08-17 13:00:00 (link to chat)1. Dan Haren WTF happen? 2. Will the Angels pick up his $15.5 million option for 2013 and take the risk that he's just having a really really bad year and will revert back to prior form in 2013... or do they pay out $3 mil, move on, and let some other team figure out whether he's even a viable back-end rotation guy in the future?
(WestCoastMets from The Devil's Waiting Room)
Yeah, so Dan Haren. He's still got an edge on Joe Saunders since the trade in 2010, but it's close; two-tenths of a run of ERA or so. He had four starts in the previous three years in which he walked as many batters as he struck out. He has five of those this year. This isn't really like 2010, when he was getting BABIP'd to death. Very hittable.

Haren had been losing velocity steadily for a few years, and this might just be the year it got to be too much. It's a chat, so anything I say here has been researched for about 14 seconds, so give me a break if this is wrong, but it looks to me like he allowed one home run last year on a four-seamer up in the zone. And this year he has allowed 11. He throws a lot of four-seamers up in the zone, and when the velocity on them drops from 90 mph to 88.5 mph, it's hard to survive. He did OK in the past with less velocity because he developed the cutter on the fly, but I'm not sure what he can develop next. And even the cutter has gotten a little more slidery than he'd like at times this year.

I think the Angels pick up the option. What other choice do they have? Sign a pitcher for four years as a free agent? Almost impossible that that wouldn't be even riskier. As it is, they'll presumably let Ervin walk, may not have a chance to re-sign Greinke, and be looking at two starters plus Garrett Richards, Jerome Williams and ___________. So, yeah, option picked up, and hope it's just his back. Since he acknowledged the back soreness, his ERA is 5.5, but on the other hand who knows. (Sam Miller)
2012-05-31 14:00:00 (link to chat)Are you still a Billy Beane fan? I'm not anymore; the guy can't make good trades that don't involve Dan Haren. If not, do you see any way he doesn't outlive all of us as GM-for-life?
(oira79 from San Francisco)
I wish he'd quit shilling for ownership's desires to move to San Jose (the crying about how the A's can't compete in Oakland isn't really becoming of a man of his stature), but I'm not going to be calling for his head any time soon. Taking shots at contention hasn't worked out when he's gone for it, but I'd dispute this "good trades" point -- three years of Seth Smith for Josh Outman and Guillermo Moscoso is a steal, for instance. (Jason Wojciechowski)
2012-05-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)How do you see Dan Haren performing for the rest of the year? Is there something wrong or is this just a bad couple of starts strung together?
(Tony from OKC)
His back is bothering him hence the poor outings against two would-be favorable matchups. I think a DL stint might be in order to get him back on track. I think it's all related to that and a healthy Haren will be excellent. (Paul Sporer)
2011-07-21 13:00:00 (link to chat)Cheslor Cuthbert is 18 years old, hitting .329 with a .869 OPS at a third. Have other people caught on yet?
(Travis from KC)
KG has him in his Top 50 midseason and had him in his Top 15 even after the Grienke deal. He's obviously taken a big step to actualizing the talent. But it's very tough for most to get too excited about a player before they do it at AA. Remember: Jerry DiPoto got crushed at the deadline for the Dan Haren deal last year because the best player in it was at Low A. Tyler Skaggs has turned into a really good prospect, but, most want success at a higher level before going, well, ape over them. (Mike Ferrin)
2010-12-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)With all of the zip code changes of aces this offseason, everyone has seemingly forgotten that Dan Haren was a huge part of trade talks last season. He went to the Angels and was "ehh." Do you see any of the pitchers who've switched teams struggling in their new role, or just not living up to lofty expectations immediately? This would extend to include the Shaun Marcums of the world, too.
(Henchman Holding Wrench from Underground Layer)
Yeah. Zach Duke. Because he stinks. (Eric Seidman)
2010-08-02 13:30:00 (link to chat)Do the Dodgers realize how much older they got by trading away 7 players for older rentals? And there's no way their low playoffs odds justify this sort of decision-making, right? And couldn't those 7 players have brought back something better like a Dan Haren? I think the Dodgers were the biggest losers at the trade deadline.
(Christy Canyon from Brooklyn)
The deadline? I'd argue they were the biggest losers three weeks ago, when they should have acted, instead of dawdling until the deadline to make a group of semi-obvious moves that didn't cost them any of their main prospects. They weren't a great-looking contender then; they're now a procrastinating underdog of major proportions. (Christina Kahrl)
2010-07-26 14:00:00 (link to chat)What letter grade would you give Jerry DiPoto's return for Dan Haren? Explain...
(SprungOnSports from Long Island)
Well ... he did get rid of some salary. He did get a guy who can start in the major leagues in return, and hopefully at least one decent prospect. And maybe he knows something about Haren we don't. As much as I'd like to give it an F, given how much more I think he could have gotten from other teams, I admit there's a lot I don't know about this so I can only give it a D. (Ken Funck)
2008-04-25 15:00:00 (link to chat)Jay, I've watched a number of games involving NL West teams this year. If the Diamondbacks get something from Randy Johnson this year (say, 20 decent-to-good starts), aren't they going to be tough to catch. It seems like the Dodgers and Rockies are going to have a tough time putting up the pitching and the Padres bats just aren't anything to write home about.
(squintsp34 from Chicago)
The Snakes are off to a great start, and as I onted atop this week's Hit List, the fact that Micah Owings has been pitching about as well as Brandon Webb and Dan Haren is a big reason why. They started the year with 13 consecutive quality starts between them, and as a whole, the rotation's ERA is still under 3.00. Whether it's Johnson or Doug Davis, if they can get a functional performance from their #4, they'll be very tough to beatn, particularly in a division where the other teams sem content to fall on their faces. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-03-07 13:00:00 (link to chat)If you were building a Scoresheet team in a NL keeper league, would you rather have Dan Haren or Clayton Kershaw for the next 5 years?
(David from USA)
Haren, and I think that question is pretty much a slam-dunk. (Nate Silver)
2008-02-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Is moving to a hitter's park from a pitcher's park going to hurt Dan Haren's production, even slightly?
(Sam from Anderson, SC)
Some of the numbers might move around a bit (his HR/9, his ERA), but his value to Arizona won't in any significant degree. (Christina Kahrl)
2008-01-14 13:00:00 (link to chat)Okay Will, last year you said, on numerous occasions, and in spite of his struggles in '06, that Josh Beckett would be competing for the Cy Young in '07. He very nearly won it. Who's your man in '08?
(Ed from Chicago)
Not quite Phil Nevin, but I'll take it. Beckett was an easy one because he had a good-to-dominant team that was going to allow him to put up big win totals. Same with Sabathia. Give me Beckett or Schilling in the AL with a side order of Verlander. The NL is a lot tougher since there's no dominant teams and the easy picks -- Zambrano, Hamels, Sheets - have big questions. I'll take Dan Haren. (Will Carroll)
2008-01-15 14:30:00 (link to chat)Hey Marc, Thanks for the chat. What does the change of scenery mean for Dan Haren? Which is the most important factor in terms of his fantasy value, the less competitive NL, more wins with the D-backs, or worse defense behind him?
(Ben F from California)
The D'backs and A's defenses were pretty much the same last year, according to Defensive Efficiency. I think the park is going to be the biggest factor (which I received a whole bunch of e-mails for after a fantasy beat piece). The difference between the AL and NL is significant on a lot of levels, but we're also talking about a pitcher going from one of the friendliest pitcher parks to arguably one of the top 3 hitter's parks in the league. That's a pretty huge difference that I think weighs more on Haren's future performance than the league switch does. It's what will make him a #2 caliber guy, or a 1A at best. Webb is still the go-to guy out there. (Marc Normandin)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2010-10-06 10:00:002010 Playoffs Day Oneddanyc (nyc): Steve, if the Yanks really thought Montero could catch, would they have been willing to trade him for 3 months of C. Lee?

They're highly enamored of Cliff Lee. Note they didn't make the same offer, insofar as we know, for Dan Haren or Roy Oswalt or anyone like that--given that no one as good as Montero moved in those deals, I think it's safe to guess he wasn't on the market anymore. So they made a valuation that getting Cliff Lee would bring them another ring, and for that you trade away Montero who (A) is a really good-looking hitter but (B) not an easy fit on their roster as currently constructed. Once the Lee deal fell through, they had to go back to trying to make the best of their square peg/round hole situation and see if just maybe Monty could catch. (Steven Goldman)
2009-10-15 17:00:002009 NLCS Game One (Phillies/Dodgers)twinkies25 (MN): So, do you guys think that Chase Utley or Dan Haren will get any consideration for MVP and Cy Young? (not that they deserve them, but they both had fantastic years). The only thing seperating them from those awards are The Machine and The Freak (no offense for Cardinal and Giant fans, I love them as much as you do!!)

I tend not to worry so much about mid-ballot finishes. I do take umbrage with certain voters, for instance, leaving Halladay off of their ballot/out of the top three, but in the NL Haren shouldn't be in the top three, and Pujols is certainly the MVP, which isn't up for debate. Utley is definitely the most valuable Phillies player, but his MVP chances are nowhere near the same as, say, Wainwright or Carpenter winning the Cy over Lincecum. (Eric Seidman)
 

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