Biographical

Portrait of Corey Kluber

Corey Kluber PIndians

Indians Player Cards | Indians Team Audit | Indians Depth Chart

2018 Projections (Rest of Season Projections - seasonal age 32)
IP ERA WHIP SO W L SV WARP
73.7 3.04 1.10 83 7 3 0 1.7
Birth Date4-10-1986
Height6' 4"
Weight215 lbs
Age32 years, 3 months, 12 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
6.72014
6.32015
5.52016
7.52017
5.82018
+proj
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
2011 CLE MLB 3 0 4.3 0 0 0 6 3 5 0 .254 105 12.5 6.2 0.0 10.4 40% .400 .313 2.08 4.21 8.31 108 4.74 110.2 0.0
2012 CLE MLB 12 12 63.0 2 5 0 76 18 54 9 .263 100 10.9 2.6 1.3 7.7 46% .342 .301 1.49 4.23 5.14 92 3.69 84.7 1.1
2013 CLE MLB 26 24 147.3 11 5 0 153 33 136 15 .263 99 9.3 2.0 0.9 8.3 48% .329 .261 1.26 3.32 3.85 89 3.65 87.4 2.3
2014 CLE MLB 34 34 235.7 18 9 0 207 51 269 14 .264 103 7.9 1.9 0.5 10.3 50% .316 .230 1.09 2.37 2.44 69 2.53 62.0 6.7
2015 CLE MLB 32 32 222.0 9 16 0 189 45 245 22 .258 105 7.7 1.8 0.9 9.9 44% .297 .225 1.05 2.94 3.49 78 2.70 63.0 6.3
2016 CLE MLB 32 32 215.0 18 9 0 170 57 227 22 .258 112 7.1 2.4 0.9 9.5 46% .271 .215 1.06 3.21 3.14 83 3.11 68.9 5.5
2017 CLE MLB 29 29 203.7 18 4 0 141 36 265 21 .256 105 6.2 1.6 0.9 11.7 46% .267 .192 0.87 2.47 2.25 62 2.26 48.1 7.5
2018 CLE MLB 20 20 133.7 12 5 0 104 17 132 19 .262 105 7.0 1.1 1.3 8.9 46% .248 .215 0.91 3.44 2.76 79 2.61 58.8 4.1
CareerMLB1881831224.78853010462601333122.2601057.71.90.99.847%.294.2271.072.973.09772.8665.933.1

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
2007 EUG A- 10 7 33.3 1 1 0 28 15 33 1 .269 109 7.6 4.1 0.3 8.9 49% .293 .236 1.29 3.60 3.51 95 3.26 93.4
2008 FTW A 10 10 56.0 4 3 0 49 13 72 8 .260 103 7.9 2.1 1.3 11.6 38% .304 .244 1.11 3.56 3.21 81 2.79 63.3
2008 LEL A+ 19 16 85.3 2 5 0 93 34 75 9 .271 97 9.8 3.6 0.9 7.9 45% .327 .290 1.49 4.65 6.01 105 5.77 112.1
2009 LEL A+ 19 19 109.0 7 9 0 110 36 124 9 .270 98 9.1 3.0 0.7 10.2 49% .344 .274 1.34 3.71 4.54 78 2.75 53.2
2009 SAN AA 9 9 45.0 2 4 0 45 34 35 5 .253 116 9.0 6.8 1.0 7.0 34% .317 .277 1.76 5.53 4.60 120 9.81 201.7
2010 AKR AA 5 5 26.3 2 2 0 38 10 21 0 .255 101 13.0 3.4 0.0 7.2 41% .418 .299 1.83 3.13 3.76 103 7.47 156.8
2010 SAN AA 22 21 122.7 6 6 0 121 40 136 7 .262 90 8.9 2.9 0.5 10.0 42% .342 .267 1.31 2.89 3.45 78 3.97 86.6
2010 COH AAA 2 2 11.0 1 1 0 10 6 8 1 .256 104 8.2 4.9 0.8 6.5 30% .310 .241 1.45 5.19 3.27 113 8.07 173.1
2011 CLE MLB 3 0 4.3 0 0 0 6 3 5 0 .254 105 12.5 6.2 0.0 10.4 40% .400 .313 2.08 4.21 8.31 108 4.74 110.2
2011 COH AAA 27 27 150.7 7 11 0 153 70 143 19 .258 108 9.1 4.2 1.1 8.5 38% .314 .253 1.48 4.53 5.56 108 7.50 168.2
2012 CLE MLB 12 12 63.0 2 5 0 76 18 54 9 .263 100 10.9 2.6 1.3 7.7 46% .342 .301 1.49 4.23 5.14 92 3.69 84.7
2012 COH AAA 21 21 125.3 11 7 0 121 49 128 9 .254 110 8.7 3.5 0.6 9.2 48% .316 .241 1.36 3.34 3.59 79 3.04 69.1
2013 CLE MLB 26 24 147.3 11 5 0 153 33 136 15 .263 99 9.3 2.0 0.9 8.3 48% .329 .261 1.26 3.32 3.85 89 3.65 87.4
2013 COH AAA 2 2 12.3 1 1 0 14 3 12 2 .252 102 10.2 2.2 1.5 8.8 51% .343 .279 1.38 4.09 6.57 90 3.14 72.1
2014 CLE MLB 34 34 235.7 18 9 0 207 51 269 14 .264 103 7.9 1.9 0.5 10.3 50% .316 .230 1.09 2.37 2.44 69 2.53 62.0
2015 CLE MLB 32 32 222.0 9 16 0 189 45 245 22 .258 105 7.7 1.8 0.9 9.9 44% .297 .225 1.05 2.94 3.49 78 2.70 63.0
2016 CLE MLB 32 32 215.0 18 9 0 170 57 227 22 .258 112 7.1 2.4 0.9 9.5 46% .271 .215 1.06 3.21 3.14 83 3.11 68.9
2017 CLE MLB 29 29 203.7 18 4 0 141 36 265 21 .256 105 6.2 1.6 0.9 11.7 46% .267 .192 0.87 2.47 2.25 62 2.26 48.1
2017 AKR AA 1 1 5.0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 .263 96 1.8 0.0 0.0 1.8 50% .071 .026 0.20 2.82 0.00 97 3.31 73.1
2018 CLE MLB 20 20 133.7 12 5 0 104 17 132 19 .262 105 7.0 1.1 1.3 8.9 46% .248 .215 0.91 3.44 2.76 79 2.61 58.8

Plate Discipline

YEAR PITCHES ZONE_RT SWING_RT CONTACT_RT Z_SWING_RT O_SWING_RT Z_CONTACT_RT O_CONTACT_RT SW_STRK_RT
2011 89 0.4382 0.4607 0.7073 0.5897 0.3600 0.8261 0.5556 0.2927
2012 1082 0.4898 0.4556 0.7424 0.6264 0.2917 0.8404 0.5404 0.2576
2013 2287 0.5216 0.4477 0.7480 0.5893 0.2934 0.8435 0.5389 0.2520
2014 3486 0.5149 0.4676 0.7288 0.5978 0.3294 0.8677 0.4614 0.2712
2015 3262 0.5067 0.5037 0.7255 0.6443 0.3592 0.8319 0.5294 0.2745
2016 3172 0.4877 0.4805 0.7146 0.6160 0.3514 0.8384 0.5079 0.2854
2017 2939 0.4896 0.4855 0.6636 0.5942 0.3813 0.8316 0.4126 0.3364
2018 1840 0.4902 0.4810 0.7514 0.6164 0.3507 0.8597 0.5684 0.2486
Career181570.5010.47730.72060.61120.34250.84460.49960.2794

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2013-08-06 2013-09-06 15-DL 31 27 Right Fingers Sprain Middle Finger - -
2013-07-21 2013-07-26 DTD 5 4 Left Hip Tightness - -
2012-11-30 2012-11-30 Off 0 0 Right Knee Surgery Meniscus 2012-11-30 -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2020 CLE $1,000,000
2019 CLE $13,200,000
2018 CLE $10,700,000
2017 CLE $7,700,000
2016 CLE $4,700,000
2015 CLE $1,200,000
2014 CLE $514,000
2013 CLE $
2012 CLE $
YearsDescriptionSalary
4 yrPrevious$14,114,000
2018Current$10,700,000
5 yrPvs + Cur$24,814,000
2 yrFuture$14,200,000
7 yrTotal$39,014,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
5 y 74 dJet Sports5 years/$38.5M (2015-19), 2020-21 option

Details
  • 5 years/$38.5M (2015-19), plus 2020-21 club options. Signed extension with Cleveland 4/5/15, replacing one-year deal for $0.601M signed 3/11/15. $1M signing bonus. 15:$1M, 16:$4.5M, 17:$7.5M, 18:$10.5M, 19:$13M, 20:$13.5M club option ($1M buyout), 21:$14M club option ($1M buyout). Value of options may increase up to $4M each based on finish in 2015-19 Cy Young votes. Assignment bonus: $1M if traded. If traded in 2015-19, new club must exercise or decline both 2020 and 2021 options within 3 days after end of 2019 World Series. If traded in 2020, 2021 option converts to a vesting option guaranteed if Kluber has 160 innings pitched in 2020 and is not on the disabled list at the end of the 2020 season.
  • 1 year/$0.514M (2014). Re-signed by Cleveland 3/4/14. Award bonuses, including $10,000 for Cy Young.
  • 1 year/$0.4918M (2013). Re-signed by Cleveland 3/7/13.
  • 1 year (2012). Re-signed by Cleveland 3/3/12.
  • 1 year (2011). Contract purchased by Cleveland 11/19/10. Re-signed by Cleveland 2/11.
  • Acquired by Cleveland in trade from San Diego 7/31/10 (Jake Westbrook deal).
  • Drafted by San Diego 2007 (7-134) (Stetson) $0.2M signing bonus.

2018 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
90o 16.2 6 0 29 29 211.7 154 53 244 20 .267 0.98 2.19 2.59 60.8 6.6
80o 15.9 6.4 0 29 29 205.7 158 54 237 20 .277 1.03 2.46 2.9 54.6 5.9
70o 15.6 6.7 0 29 29 201.3 160 55 232 20 .284 1.07 2.67 3.13 50.0 5.4
60o 15.4 7 0 29 29 197.7 162 55 228 21 .290 1.10 2.85 3.33 46.1 5.0
50o 15.2 7.3 0 29 29 194.3 164 56 224 21 .296 1.13 3.02 3.52 42.3 4.6
40o 15 7.5 0 29 29 190.9 166 56 220 21 .302 1.16 3.19 3.7 38.7 4.2
30o 14.8 7.8 0 29 29 187.4 167 57 216 21 .308 1.20 3.36 3.91 34.5 3.8
20o 14.5 8.2 0 29 29 183.2 169 58 211 22 .315 1.24 3.58 4.14 29.9 3.3
10o 14.2 8.6 0 29 29 177.6 172 59 204 22 .325 1.30 3.87 4.48 23.2 2.5
Weighted Mean15.27.302929194.41635622421.2951.133.003.542.74.6

Preseason Long-Term Forecast (Beyond the 2018 Projections)

Playing time estimates are based on performance, not Depth Charts.
Year Age W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR GB% BABIP WHIP ERA DRA H/9 BB/9 K/9 HR/9 WARP
201933131003131202169592292245.2931.133.303.567.52.610.21.04.9
202034131003131200172592292345.2981.163.363.627.72.710.31.04.7
202135121002929181157552042145.2981.173.413.687.82.710.11.04.3
20223611902626155134471741845.2981.173.443.717.82.710.11.03.8
2023378702020120106371351545.3001.193.573.858.02.810.21.12.7
2024388601919112101341261345.3071.213.473.748.12.710.11.02.7
202539760171710089301111245.3011.193.493.768.02.710.01.12.4
2026406501515877726961045.3011.193.533.818.02.710.01.02.0
202741540131374662382945.3011.213.523.808.12.810.01.11.7

Comparable Players (Similarity Index 71)

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend
1 89 Zack Greinke 2016 4.54
2 86 Justin Verlander 2015 3.78
3 83 Roger Clemens 1995 4.44
4 82 Juan Marichal 1970 4.75
5 82 Adam Wainwright 2014 2.54
6 82 Jason Schmidt 2005 4.71
7 81 Max Scherzer 2017 2.78
8 80 Cole Hamels 2016 3.72
9 80 Chris Carpenter 2007 7.50
10 79 Kelvim Escobar 2008 0.00 DNP
11 79 CC Sabathia 2013 5.20
12 78 Gaylord Perry 1971 3.73
13 78 Jake Peavy 2013 4.35
14 78 A.J. Burnett 2009 4.30
15 78 Roy Oswalt 2010 2.98
16 78 John Smoltz 1999 3.38
17 76 Pedro Martinez 2004 4.11
18 76 Roy Halladay 2009 3.09
19 76 Anibal Sanchez 2016 6.34
20 75 Justin Duchscherer 2010 3.54
21 75 Josh Beckett 2012 4.81
22 75 Mike Garcia 1956 4.23
23 74 Sandy Koufax 1968 0.00 DNP
24 74 C.J. Wilson 2013 3.94
25 74 Clay Buchholz 2017 12.27
26 73 Kevin Millwood 2007 5.79
27 73 Warren Spahn 1953 2.66
28 73 Phil Niekro 1971 3.75
29 73 Jon Lester 2016 2.53
30 72 Jered Weaver 2015 4.75
31 72 Dan Haren 2013 4.88
32 72 Jeff Fassero 1995 4.86
33 72 Alexi Ogando 2016 5.06
34 71 Shaun Marcum 2014 0.00 DNP
35 71 Scot Shields 2008 4.12
36 71 Doug Fister 2016 4.89
37 70 Vic Raschi 1951 3.71
38 70 Francisco Liriano 2016 5.41
39 70 Erik Bedard 2011 4.38
40 70 Ryan Dempster 2009 4.23
41 70 Keith Foulke 2005 5.91
42 70 Kevin Brown 1997 2.92
43 69 Jeff Samardzija 2017 4.64
44 69 Johan Santana 2011 0.00 DNP
45 69 Freddy Garcia 2009 4.34
46 69 Kerry Wood 2009 4.25
47 69 Bob Gibson 1968 1.45
48 69 Tom Gordon 2000 0.00 DNP
49 68 Doug Drabek 1995 5.06
50 68 Matt Clement 2007 0.00 DNP
51 68 Andy Messersmith 1978 8.46
52 68 Hideki Okajima 2008 2.61
53 68 Cliff Lee 2011 2.55
54 68 Ted Higuera 1990 4.24
55 68 Don Sutton 1977 3.45
56 68 Jonathan Papelbon 2013 3.36
57 67 Brian Fuentes 2008 3.16
58 67 Junior Guerra 2017 5.63
59 67 Luke Gregerson 2016 3.59
60 67 Jim Palmer 1978 2.86
61 67 Rafael Soriano 2012 2.26
62 67 Bronson Arroyo 2009 4.13
63 67 Joe Nathan 2007 2.01
64 67 Brendan Donnelly 2004 3.00
65 67 Jose Valverde 2010 3.43
66 66 Michael Gonzalez 2010 4.01
67 66 John Wetteland 1999 4.09
68 66 Greg Maddux 1998 2.69
69 66 Colby Lewis 2012 4.11
70 66 Scott Kazmir 2016 4.69
71 66 Jack Morris 1987 3.76
72 66 Frank Lary 1962 6.64 DNP
73 66 John Lackey 2011 6.69
74 66 Kevin Gregg 2010 3.66
75 66 Heath Bell 2010 2.19
76 66 Carlos Zambrano 2013 0.00 DNP
77 66 Tony Watson 2017 3.51
78 66 Tom Seaver 1977 2.69
79 66 David Robertson 2017 1.84
80 65 Orel Hershiser 1991 3.46
81 65 Matt Garza 2016 5.93
82 65 Casey Janssen 2014 4.34
83 65 Brad Penny 2010 4.04
84 65 Brandon McCarthy 2016 5.40
85 65 Ted Lilly 2008 4.22
86 65 Francisco Cordero 2007 3.27
87 65 Barry Zito 2010 4.38
88 65 Jason Frasor 2010 4.24
89 65 Jesse Crain 2014 0.00 DNP
90 65 Jeff Montgomery 1994 4.23
91 65 Wilbur Wood 1974 3.99
92 65 J.J. Putz 2009 5.52
93 65 Joakim Soria 2016 4.18
94 65 Octavio Dotel 2006 11.70
95 65 James Shields 2014 3.77
96 65 John Hiller 1975 2.67 DNP
97 65 Gavin Floyd 2015 2.70
98 65 Huston Street 2016 6.45
99 65 Tyler Clippard 2017 5.07
100 64 Mike Mussina 2001 3.42

Platoon

SORT_FIELD PLATOON AVG OBP SLG TAv
10 vs L (Multi) .242 .303 .385 .239
11 vs R (Multi) .209 .255 .340 .207
18 Split (Multi) .033 .048 .045 .032
19 LgAvg (Multi) .006 .020 .015 .013
30 vs L (2016) .226 .289 .359 .221
31 vs R (2016) .206 .261 .354 .209
38 Split (2016) .020 .028 .005 .012
39 LgAvg (2016) .003 .018 .013 .012

Definition of multi-year splits

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2018 Due to publishing agreements, the 2018 player comments and team essays are only available in the Baseball Prospectus 2018 book (available in hardcopy, and soon e-book and Kindle).
2017 First is a two-seam fastball, starting a few inches off the plate before breaking to catch a bit of black at the last second. It is beautiful; the hitter has no chance; strike one, called. Next is a breaking ball, equally nasty whether you choose to classify it as a slider or a curve. The hitter swings, misses wildly, strike two. The breaking ball again, but a little further off this time and the hitter lays off. (The pitcher may be robotic, but he isn’t perfect.) And finally that two-seamer again, just ever so barely on the edge of the strike zone. Strike three, called. The corners of the pitcher’s mouth twitch upwards ever so briefly. He does not smile, but he is satisfied. Now imagine slight variations of this over 200-plus innings, and you have Kluber.
2016 For the past two seasons, Kluber has pitched the way June Carter described Johnny Cash's music: “Sharp like a razor, steady like a train.” The razor is his ability to take over a game, which gave baseball one of 2015's signature moments: his chase for a 21-strikeout game on May 13, 2015. He was pulled before he could hope to complete the feat—18 strikeouts in eight innings, tantalizingly close—and then struck out the side in the first inning of his next outing. To undersell it: Dude was sharp. Like a razor. And then there's the steadiness. He throws tons of innings by keeping his mechanics tight and limiting bad pitches, producing a stellar walk rate and requiring just 3.7 pitches per plate appearance. He shows all the telltale signs of a contact-inducing control artist, while also competing for the league's strikeout crown. The total package produced the AL's best FIP over the past two seasons and the second-most regular-season innings in baseball. Not bad for a boy named Klu.
2015 If Kluber's 2013 season was the breakout, then last year was the breakthrough. After a slow start, the right-handed locomotive picked up steam as the season progressed and finished with an electric five-start run that included a 1.12 ERA and 54 strikeouts against five walks in 40 innings of work, not to mention five consecutive W's that surely helped win the hearts of the voters for certain hardware. He flew past a Vulture from Chicago, trounced a pack of trophy-winning Tigers and dethroned the King of Seattle to capture the AL Cy Young crown. Kluber receives a rare "A" grade for his mechanics, a critical aspect that underlies his excellent command of mid-90s velocity. He backs that up with an exploding slider that has been known to give Crash Davis nightmares. He throws the breaking ball with two distinct shapes, yet similar velocity, including a 12-to-6 version and another that has two-plane movement, and the pitch was his finishing move for 128 of his 269 strikeouts. And he did all this pitching in front of the team with the worst defensive efficiency in the league, leading to an ERA that, as good as it was, actually underperformed his FIP.
2014 Perhaps the most shocking thing about Kluber's electric breakout season is that it should have been even better. His ERA was higher than his FIP, and there's no reason to believe that his BABIP should be as abnormally high as it was. After failing to make the rotation out of spring training, he showed that pitchers can develop at any age: The sinker he'd begun preferring the year before was hitting its spots and generating groundballs aplenty. By the time he sprained his finger in August, he had 3.54 ERA and both his walk and strikeout rates were among the league leaders. It was ugly after his September return (fueled by a .395 BABIP), but his velocity, walks and strikeouts were all back, so expect next year to have a good beat that you can dance to.
2013 Kluber is coming off his rookie season, during which he found moderate success, at least in terms of peripherals. He leaned much more heavily on a two-seamer after previously being primarily a four-seam guy, which made him more effective at the bottom of the strike zone while generating more grounders than ever before. Of course, with this switch to the two-seamer, his secondary stuff needs to be sharper to generate whiffs. His slider has shown this ability at times, but the key to his success may ultimately be improving a changeup that is still in the developmental stages. He'll also need to find consistency from the stretchsomething he's struggled with at times in the minors. If he can do this, he could be a solid fourth starter.
2012 Acquired in the three-way trade that sent Jake Westbrook out of town in 2010, Kluber could eventually wind up as a major league contributor but is more likely to dwell in Triple-A. He's a fly-ball pitcher with below-average control and command, so he needs to rely on his stuff to succeed. The problem is that his stuff is mediocre. Kluber's average-grade fastball sits around 92 mph, and he complements it with a change-up and slider, but neither is a true plus pitch. Kluber will reside in the deep end of the Indians pitching talent pool, and if he gets more than a handful of starts it will be an indication Cleveland may be sinking in the Central.
2011 Received from San Diego in the Jake Westbrook, Kluber allowed 58 baserunners during his first 37 1/3 innings as part of the Cleveland organization, so "got off to a good start" is not exactly the phrase that comes to mind. He's a big, physical left-hander with a low-90s fastball that he uses to set up a decent slider/changeup combination. While that kind of arsenal should lead to some limited big-league value, it's not going to come until he cuts down on the walks.

BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Corey Kluber

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2016-09-26 20:00:00 (link to chat)BP doesn't seem to be too high on Mike Clevinger - 45FV and no questions about him in chats. But he seems like a pretty good prospect to me. Your thoughts about him?
(Chief Wahoo from Cleveland, OH)
I seem to like him more than most. He's not ace material unless Corey Kluber tells him his One Weird Trick to transforming from a middling prospect into a Cy Young Award winner. He's 25, he throws 93-94, and he has a few workable secondary pitches. He also has Cleveland's pitching development program behind him, which has turned several pitchers into much better pitchers than their prospect pedigrees suggested. His 4.8 BB/9 in the majors this year is ugly, though. He needs to turn that around quickly or he'll end up on the outside of Cleveland's rotation looking in. (Scooter Hotz)
2015-04-16 17:00:00 (link to chat)My pitching staff is Kluber, Wood, deGrom, Pineda, Ian Kennedy, Cashner, McHugh, Paxton and Hahn. Tons of injury risky involved. Should I be worried?
(Brian from Tampa)
Somewhat, but it seems like you have enough depth that you can ride it out...and Corey Kluber seems like an anchor guy. (Mike Gianella)
2015-01-20 19:30:00 (link to chat)Who's your pick for this year's Corey Kluber and Michael Brantley?
(Mike from Chicago)
Good question. Gerrit Cole and Mookie Betts (Ben Carsley)
2015-02-13 19:00:00 (link to chat)Thanks for the chat, Mike! What are your thoughts on taking Clayton Kershaw in say the Top 5? SP seems deep, and you can build a nice staff later in the draft. The other thing is, in order to keep your advantage in SP cats by taking Kershaw, don't you have to take another pitcher earlier than you'd think, which again puts you behind the curve for hitting cats? By that I mean you don't want to take Kershaw 1st rd, then not another pitcher until 10th/11th rd as that might be just as good as someone who takes pitchers in say 4th and 7th/8th rds, and you've lost the advantage Kershaw gives you, while also losing out a potentially elite hitter in the 1st rd.
(Shawn from Cubicle)
I had a long discussion about this today on Twitter with Ray Guilfoyle of Fake Teams and Dan Strafford of Sirius XM. I think it's OK to do, but given the variability at the bottom of the SP pool, you have a greater likelihood of getting a Johnny Cueto or Corey Kluber type relatively late (like last year) as opposed to getting a great hitter late. If Kershaw tanks, that's 1/9th of your rotation going down in flames, versus if a Bryce Harper tanks that's 1/14th of your offense. My preference is to start taking pitchers in the 6th round or later. I'll pounce earlier on an arm I like if he falls, but generally speaking I hate taking a pitcher in the top five. I would have taken Pedro #1 during his prime without hesitation, but that's as crazy an exception to a rule as you are going to get. (Mike Gianella)
2015-01-21 15:00:00 (link to chat)You and Sporer were in on him last year; who is this year's Corey Kluber?
(Sara from Tacoma)
The easy answer is: nobody.

Kluber made a tremendous leap, pitching above and beyond what I expected despite already being extremely high on him going into the season. He stood out as a pitcher with an A-grade delivery and electric arsenal that had not yet been discovered by the mainstream, and then he went and upped the ante by further improving his mechanics and stuff (especially command). There are certainly a handful of "breakout" candidates, but I don't see anyone close to the Kluber category. (Doug Thorburn)
2015-01-21 15:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Doug: If there isn't a predictable next Corey Kluber, is there a predictable next Marcus Stroman? That is, a prospect in the minor leagues with size/vertical plane concerns that are overblown and might surprise in the majors in 2015?
(Drifter from Long Branch)
There isn't really a Stroman mirror for 2015, but '14 had Yordano Ventura, which I think is a closer comp than any of the current crop. When in doubt, bet on the raw stuff. (Doug Thorburn)
2015-01-08 12:00:00 (link to chat)Who is your Corey Kluber of 2015??
(Bob from Cleveland)
There are a couple of questions like this that I don't quite know how to answer. The short answer is that I don't know yet. I really like Drew Pomeranz, I think he'll do big things in OAK. I see a lot of what I saw in Sonny Gray a few years ago in Marcus Stroman, so I like him to really blow up in 2015.

Beyond that, I'm not sure. Gausman stands to really improve if he throws his slider more. Look for some thoughts on this in my column over the next two months though. (Jeff Long)
2015-01-28 19:00:00 (link to chat)Mauricio, who in the AL is this year's Corey Kluber?? Thanks a bunch, I really appreciate your opinion!!
(Billy from Rotoworld)
Gavin Floyd.

Joking aside, wouldn't surprise me if Shelby Miller took all sorts of steps forward. (Mauricio Rubio)
2014-10-17 12:00:00 (link to chat)Any under the radar pitching prospects or young pitchers who could surprise next year by taking a big step forward like Corey Kluber, or to a lesser extent Carlos Carrasco and Jacob DeGrom? Thanks.
(John from Texas)
Do I look like Jason Parks?

I guess I do, kind of. Can we get a ruling on this? (Andy McCullough)
2014-09-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Does the "strikeout scourge" era make a fantasy $1 pitcher strategy more likely to succeed?
(ssimon from Pelham, N.Y.)
Not necessarily, because the bar has been raised for what makes a fantasy pitcher worthwhile. That said, I've never been a big believer in spending heavily on starting pitching, and the annual emergence of guys like Corey Kluber, Tyson Ross, Dallas Keuchel and Garrett Richards -- among many others -- just re-affirms that for me every year. (Cory Schwartz)
2014-06-27 14:00:00 (link to chat)Once again, Corey Kluber ia dominating.He is very unusual in that he throws an both an excellent Cutter and Slider. Could this be why Kluber is so effective? Since the pitches are so similar, I imagine the release point and spin appear very similar out of the pitchers hand to a hitter, therefore forcing the hitter to not only guess on the velocity, but also the amount of break on the ball. Not terrible dissimilar to a fastball/changeup. Especially with Kluber, where there is SUBSTANTIAL difference in the break. Is this correct? If so, is this also very difficult to do? In an interview of Zach Grienke with Eno Sarris of Fangraphs, Grienke suggested the movement and mechanics were too similar and the pitches were meshing together into one less effective pitch.Do most major league pitchers not have the ability to pinpoint the degree to supination needed to throw both a slider and cutter?
(Matt from Cambridge)
I'm a big Kluber supporter, and his effectiveness stems from a mix of mechanics, stuff, and approach. Deception comes from his repeatable release point as well as the tendency for all of his pitches to leave the hand on a fastball plane, giving batters less time to identify incoming pitches. Manipulating precise supination is one of the great challenges for a pitcher, and those two pitches can certainly blend together if a pitcher does not have excellent command of their release point. Kluber has that command, and in fact I gave him an A- for his mechanics in the 2014 Starting Pitcher Guide, one of just 9 SP to receive an A- or higher. (Doug Thorburn)
2014-05-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is Dallas Keuchel for real? This year's Corey Kluber?
(Shawnykid23 from CT)
might be something like that. He seems to have settled on his arsenal (dropped his bigger curve), so you can make the claim that he turned a corner in a couple of regards. (Harry Pavlidis)
2014-03-27 13:00:00 (link to chat)Thoughts on Corey Kluber? He has a meh sinker, but the change,slider, and cutter all got fantastic whiffs. I know Thorburn likes his mechanics too.
(Gila Monster from Boston)
Back-endish type for me. I believe I wrote him up late last season. He's come a long way since the Indians acquired him. (R.J. Anderson)
2014-01-14 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Paul, Any value in keeping Brandon Beachy over Corey Kluber in a dynasty league? Thank you.
(nictaclacta from Glendale)
They're close, but I'd lean the healthier guy in Kluber. If costs are equal (and I believe they are in dynasty lgs) then lean health. (Paul Sporer)
2013-11-22 14:00:00 (link to chat)Doug, I need your input on long-term value. 10 team dynasty with 7 pitcher slots. Have Strasburg, Sale, Fernandez, Harvey and Chapman. Need to select two from Brandon Beachy, Andrew Cashner, Corey Kluber, Brett Anderson, Henderson Alvarez. Help appreciated. Thank you.
(nictaclacta from Glendale)
Your top end is ridiculous, even if you have to wait on Harvey. I would hold on to Cashner from the second group, no doubt, while your last guy is a tougher call. Since your 7th slot could change between now and this time next year, you are probably looking for 2014 value (or trade value) with a shot at upside - for that reason I would choose between Beachy and Anderson. Anderson still has the name and the hope, but the faith is all but sapped, so that is a dice-roll for 2014 with prayers for a break-through season that ups his trade value. Beachy is a command guy, and since command is the last thing to return from TJS, I would say that he has the best chance to vault his value next season, though his down velocity in a small sample of 2013 adds some concern.

On the jukebox: White Zombie, "Thunderkiss '65" (Doug Thorburn)
2013-09-17 13:00:00 (link to chat)What are your thoughts on Corey Kluber going forward? He seemed to come out of nowhere but has pitched pretty well, with solid peripherals, all season. Do you think his current performance is sustainable?
(Ken G. from Princeton)
like Roark, he got his walk rate down quite low but took him a little longer. Along with the improved control he has actually added some velocity this year. Impressive for a 27 year old. I wouldn't be surprised if he kept this up for another year, or even two. (Harry Pavlidis)
2013-07-19 13:00:00 (link to chat)Corey Kluber in for a big 2nd half?
(Shawn from Office)
Love the skills and the stuff, definitely think he can better his ERA the rest of the way. (Paul Sporer)
2013-07-08 14:00:00 (link to chat)Is Corey Kluber's success sustainable long term? He's had really good command in most of the games I've seen him, and the time I watched him get blown up live in Baltimore it seemed he just was getting the short end of the BABIP stick.
(cabuendia from NoVA)
A couple of questions on Kluber. I really like his delivery overall, with great balance, solid momentum, and excellent postural stability into release point. The key to his success is the effectiveness of that nasty sinker, which runs 91-94 while the bottom just falls out on the pitch, but his command of the sinker comes and goes. When it's on he is very tough to hit, but Kluber has a tendency to elevate when his timing falls off track. (Doug Thorburn)
2013-06-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)What's your take on Corey Kluber's success so far? Is it sustainable?
(RotoLando from Cloud City)
Got several Kluber questions... I'm buying. I've watched each of his last 3 outings and been impressed with his command and control of the secondary stuff. In fact, even his fastball velo has surprised me. I didn't realize he had 95-96 MPH in his back pocket. (Paul Sporer)
2013-06-18 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is Corey Kluber throwing a curve or a changeup? I'm confused.
(Klubes from Cleveland)
confusion is a natural state. In unrelated news, Matt Harvey just hit 100 on the Turner Field "gun" (Harry Pavlidis)


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