Biographical

Portrait of Dustin Pedroia

Dustin Pedroia 2BRed Sox

Red Sox Player Cards | Red Sox Team Audit | Red Sox Depth Chart

2019 Projections (Preseason PECOTA - seasonal age 35)
PA AVG HR R RBI SB DRC+ WARP
200 .286 4 23 20 2 114 0.9
Birth Date8-17-1983
Height5' 9"
Weight175 lbs
Age36 years, 2 months, 3 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
2.32015
3.32016
1.32017
-0.02018
0.92019
proj
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

YEAR TEAM AGE G PA H 2B 3B HR BB SO HBP SB CS AVG OBP SLG DRC+ DRAA BRR FRAA BWARP
2006 BOS 22 31 98 17 4 0 2 7 7 1 0 1 .191 .258 .303 74 -2.8 -1.9 2.6 0.1
2007 BOS 23 139 581 165 39 1 8 47 42 7 7 1 .317 .380 .442 111 10.8 -1.8 -0.9 2.4
2008 BOS 24 157 726 213 54 2 17 50 52 7 20 1 .326 .376 .493 124 23.6 4.5 3.5 5.2
2009 BOS 25 154 714 185 48 1 15 74 45 5 20 8 .296 .371 .447 121 20.0 3.6 0.3 4.4
2010 BOS 26 75 351 87 24 1 12 37 38 4 9 1 .288 .367 .493 128 11.8 1.3 -8.0 1.5
2011 BOS 27 159 731 195 37 3 21 86 85 1 26 8 .307 .387 .474 132 27.2 1.4 1.2 5.2
2012 BOS 28 141 623 163 39 3 15 48 60 5 20 6 .290 .347 .449 114 10.3 -0.9 -9.3 1.7
2013 BOS 29 160 724 193 42 2 9 73 75 3 17 5 .301 .372 .415 117 14.8 -1.4 4.3 3.9
2014 BOS 30 135 609 153 33 0 7 51 75 1 6 6 .278 .337 .376 105 3.7 2.9 10.0 3.5
2015 BOS 31 93 425 111 19 1 12 38 51 2 2 2 .291 .356 .441 114 8.7 -0.4 2.7 2.3
2016 BOS 32 154 698 201 36 1 15 61 73 0 7 4 .318 .376 .449 120 18.0 -2.0 -2.7 3.3
2017 BOS 33 105 463 119 19 0 7 49 48 2 4 3 .293 .369 .392 109 6.4 -5.7 -0.1 1.3
2018 BOS 34 3 13 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 .091 .231 .091 97 0.0 -0.1 -0.4 0.0
2019 BOS 35 6 21 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 .100 .143 .100 87 -0.3 -0.1 -0.2 0.0
Career151267771805394151406246543813846.299.365.439117152.0-0.83.034.7

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg LG G PA oppAVG oppOBP oppSLG BABIP BPF BRAA repLVL POS_ADJ DRC+ DRC+ SD FRAA BRR DRAA BWARP
2004 AUG A SAL 12 57 .000 .000 .000 .413 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2004 SAR A+ FSL 30 128 .000 .000 .000 .333 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2005 PME AA EAS 66 298 .265 .330 .409 .335 96 11.4 3.8 -0.1 152 0 0.8 -2.4 16.3 1.9
2005 PAW AAA INT 51 240 .269 .336 .423 .257 108 -3.4 7.0 0.1 104 0 5.1 0.6 1.5 1.4
2006 BOS MLB AL 31 98 .258 .322 .408 .188 104 -7.3 3.0 0.1 74 14 2.6 -1.9 -2.8 0.1
2006 PAW AAA INT 111 493 .258 .323 .388 .310 98 12.4 13.3 3.9 122 0 6.6 -4.6 11.1 3.0
2007 BOS MLB AL 139 581 .270 .338 .420 .333 102 14.5 17.2 -0.8 111 6 -0.9 -1.8 10.8 2.4
2008 BOS MLB AL 157 726 .264 .330 .414 .331 107 25.9 21.0 -1 124 8 3.5 4.5 23.6 5.2
2009 BOS MLB AL 154 714 .267 .335 .428 .297 111 10.8 20.5 -0.9 121 6 0.3 3.6 20.0 4.4
2010 BOS MLB AL 75 351 .259 .326 .410 .291 114 8.3 9.7 -0.4 128 10 -8.0 1.3 11.8 1.5
2010 PAW AAA INT 2 7 .270 .327 .413 .167 86 -1 0.2 -0.1 96 0 0.0 -0.1 0.0 0.0
2011 BOS MLB AL 159 731 .255 .319 .408 .325 108 25.3 19.7 -0.9 132 6 1.2 1.4 27.2 5.2
2012 BOS MLB AL 141 623 .253 .313 .406 .300 104 13.1 17.1 -0.9 114 7 -9.3 -0.9 10.3 1.7
2013 BOS MLB AL 160 724 .258 .318 .411 .326 102 18.8 19.0 -0.9 117 7 4.3 -1.4 14.8 3.9
2014 BOS MLB AL 135 609 .250 .310 .386 .307 102 6 15.7 -0.7 105 10 10.0 2.9 3.7 3.5
2015 BOS MLB AL 93 425 .254 .316 .408 .308 115 2.9 11.5 -0.6 114 12 2.7 -0.4 8.7 2.3
2016 BOS MLB AL 154 698 .257 .320 .427 .339 115 7.8 19.7 -0.9 120 6 -2.7 -2.0 18.0 3.3
2017 BOS MLB AL 105 463 .259 .326 .432 .315 104 2.5 13.5 -1.2 109 8 -0.1 -5.7 6.4 1.3
2018 BOS MLB AL 3 13 .248 .326 .413 .100 111 -1.5 0.4 0 97 5 -0.4 -0.1 0.0 0.0
2018 PAW AAA INT 5 17 .254 .316 .406 .091 90 -2.5 0.5 -0.1 67 0 0.0 -0.1 -0.5 0.0
2019 BOS MLB AL 6 21 .253 .334 .446 .111 111 -3.9 0.6 -0.2 87 11 -0.2 -0.1 -0.3 0.0
2019 GRN A SAL 3 11 .214 .333 .358 .375 107 0.8 0.3 0 193 0 0.4 -0.4 0.5 0.1
2019 PME AA EAS 6 18 .222 .293 .340 .267 100 -1.5 0.5 -0.1 29 0 0.3 -0.2 -0.9 0.0
2019 PAW AAA INT 5 20 .253 .331 .415 .200 95 -3.6 0.7 -0.2 55 0 -0.1 0.1 -1.2 -0.1

Statistics For All Levels

Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
Year Team lvl LG PA AB R H 2B 3B HR TB RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG ISO SF SH
2004 SAR A+ FSL 128 107 23 36 8 3 2 56 14 13 4 0 2 .336 .424 .523 .187 1 1
2004 AUG A SAL 57 50 11 20 5 0 1 28 5 6 3 2 0 .400 .474 .560 .160 0 0
2005 PAW AAA INT 240 204 39 52 9 1 5 78 24 24 17 1 0 .255 .357 .382 .127 1 1
2005 PME AA EAS 298 256 39 83 19 2 8 130 40 34 26 7 3 .324 .409 .508 .184 2 2
2006 PAW AAA INT 493 423 55 129 30 3 5 180 50 48 27 1 4 .305 .380 .426 .121 9 9
2006 BOS MLB AL 98 89 5 17 4 0 2 27 7 7 7 0 1 .191 .258 .303 .112 0 1
2007 BOS MLB AL 581 520 86 165 39 1 8 230 50 47 42 7 1 .317 .380 .442 .125 2 5
2008 BOS MLB AL 726 653 118 213 54 2 17 322 83 50 52 20 1 .326 .376 .493 .167 9 7
2009 BOS MLB AL 714 626 115 185 48 1 15 280 72 74 45 20 8 .296 .371 .447 .152 6 3
2010 PAW AAA INT 7 6 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 .167 .286 .167 .000 0 0
2010 BOS MLB AL 351 302 53 87 24 1 12 149 41 37 38 9 1 .288 .367 .493 .205 6 2
2011 BOS MLB AL 731 635 102 195 37 3 21 301 91 86 85 26 8 .307 .387 .474 .167 7 2
2012 BOS MLB AL 623 563 81 163 39 3 15 253 65 48 60 20 6 .290 .347 .449 .160 6 1
2013 BOS MLB AL 724 641 91 193 42 2 9 266 84 73 75 17 5 .301 .372 .415 .114 7 0
2014 BOS MLB AL 609 551 72 153 33 0 7 207 53 51 75 6 6 .278 .337 .376 .098 6
2015 BOS MLB AL 425 381 46 111 19 1 12 168 42 38 51 2 2 .291 .356 .441 .150 3 1
2016 BOS MLB AL 698 633 105 201 36 1 15 284 74 61 73 7 4 .318 .376 .449 .131 3 1
2017 BOS MLB AL 463 406 46 119 19 0 7 159 62 49 48 4 3 .293 .369 .392 .099 4 2
2018 BOS MLB AL 13 11 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 .091 .231 .091 .000 0 0
2018 PAW AAA INT 17 14 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 3 0 0 .071 .235 .071 .000 0 0
2019 PAW AAA INT 20 19 2 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 4 0 0 .158 .200 .158 .000 0 0
2019 PME AA EAS 18 18 1 4 0 0 0 4 1 0 3 0 0 .222 .222 .222 .000 0 0
2019 GRN A SAL 11 9 1 3 1 0 0 4 0 2 1 0 0 .333 .455 .444 .111 0 0
2019 BOS MLB AL 21 20 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 0 .100 .143 .100 .000 0 0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr% CSAA
2008 2605 0.5040 0.4430 0.9194 0.5887 0.2949 0.9534 0.8504 0.0806 -0.0139
2009 2777 0.5085 0.3867 0.9274 0.5163 0.2527 0.9410 0.8986 0.0726 -0.0109
2010 1506 0.5372 0.4223 0.8899 0.5637 0.2582 0.9320 0.7833 0.1101 -0.0187
2011 3042 0.5082 0.4283 0.8526 0.5770 0.2747 0.8857 0.7810 0.1474 -0.0108
2012 2444 0.5323 0.4206 0.8745 0.5757 0.2441 0.8932 0.8244 0.1255 -0.0155
2013 2910 0.5034 0.4275 0.8746 0.5754 0.2775 0.9063 0.8080 0.1254 -0.0131
2014 2480 0.5218 0.4339 0.8773 0.5734 0.2816 0.9070 0.8114 0.1227 -0.0173
2015 1634 0.5300 0.4315 0.8709 0.5635 0.2826 0.9098 0.7834 0.1291 -0.0106
2016 2706 0.4948 0.4302 0.8780 0.5691 0.2941 0.9042 0.8284 0.1220 0.0000
2017 1829 0.4904 0.4139 0.8877 0.5708 0.2629 0.9180 0.8245 0.1123 0.0000
2018 49 0.4490 0.4082 0.9500 0.5455 0.2963 1.0000 0.8750 0.0500 0.0000
2019 77 0.5974 0.4416 0.8824 0.6087 0.1935 0.9286 0.6667 0.1176 0.0000
Career240590.51160.42380.88530.56750.27290.91430.82170.1147-0.0110

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2014-09-09 2014-09-29 DTD 20 18 Left Hand Surgery 1st Dorsal Compartment Release with Tenosynovectomy 2014-09-11
2014-08-31 2014-09-05 DTD 5 5 - Head Concussion Player Collision with Runner While Fielding -
2014-08-17 2014-08-18 DTD 1 1 - General Medical Illness -
2014-08-16 2014-08-16 DTD 0 0 - Foot Contusion Foul Ball -
2014-04-13 2014-04-15 DTD 2 1 Left Wrist Inflammation - -
2013-11-13 2013-11-13 Off 0 0 Left Thumb Surgery Ulnar Collateral Ligament 2013-11-13 -
2013-08-18 2013-08-18 DTD 0 0 Left Foot Contusion Foul Ball - -
2013-05-29 2013-05-29 DTD 0 0 Left Thumb Sprain UCL Sprain - -
2013-04-02 2013-04-03 DTD 1 0 Right Thumb Soreness - -
2012-10-11 2012-10-11 Off 0 0 Right Fingers Surgery Fracture 2012-10-11 -
2012-10-01 2012-10-02 DTD 1 1 Left Fingers Fracture Ring Finger - -
2012-07-04 2012-07-19 15-DL 15 11 Right Thumb Sprain Volar Plate - -
2012-06-20 2012-06-21 DTD 1 1 - Thumb Soreness - -
2012-05-29 2012-06-05 DTD 7 6 Right Thumb Strain Abductor Muscle - -
2012-03-23 2012-03-24 Camp 1 0 Right Forearm Contusion HBP - -
2011-09-30 2011-09-30 Off 0 0 Left Foot Surgery Hardware Removal 2011-09-30 -
2011-06-09 2011-06-10 DTD 1 1 Knee Contusion Patella -
2011-05-24 2011-05-25 DTD 1 1 Left Ankle Sprain -
2011-05-18 2011-05-18 DTD 0 0 Knee Contusion Patella -
2011-04-20 2011-04-20 DTD 0 0 Left Ankle Sprain -
2010-08-19 2010-10-04 15-DL 46 41 Left Foot Surgery Nonunion Navicular Fracture 2010-09-03
2010-06-26 2010-08-17 15-DL 52 44 Left Foot Fracture Navicular From Foul Ball -
2010-05-16 2010-05-17 DTD 1 1 - Knee Soreness -
2010-03-24 2010-03-27 Camp 3 0 Left Wrist Sprain Diving Catch -
2009-05-30 2009-05-30 DTD 0 0 - Knee Contusion HBP -
2009-05-10 2009-05-14 DTD 4 3 Right Groin Strain -
2009-03-05 2009-03-20 Camp 15 0 Left Abdomen Strain Oblique -
2007-11-06 2007-11-06 Off 0 0 Left Wrist Surgery Hamate Been Playing with for 2 Months 2007-11-06
2007-10-05 2007-10-05 DTD 0 0 Left Shoulder Soreness -
2007-08-23 2007-08-24 DTD 1 0 Left Elbow Contusion HBP -
2007-03-18 2007-03-20 Camp 2 0 Left Hand Contusion HBP -
2006-04-06 2006-04-17 Minors 11 0 - Not Disclosed -
2005-07-18 2005-07-30 Minors 12 13 Right Wrist Soreness - -
2005-06-28 2005-07-05 Minors 7 7 Right Wrist Contusion HBP - -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2021 BOS $12,125,000
2020 BOS $13,125,000
2019 BOS $15,125,000
2018 BOS $16,125,000
2017 BOS $15,125,000
2016 BOS $13,125,000
2015 BOS $12,625,000
2014 BOS $12,625,000
2013 BOS $10,250,000
2012 BOS $8,250,000
2011 BOS $5,750,000
2010 BOS $3,750,000
2009 BOS $1,750,000
2008 BOS $457,000
2007 BOS $380,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
12 yrPrevious$100,212,000
2019Current$15,125,000
13 yrPvs + Cur$115,337,000
2 yrFuture$25,250,000
15 yrTotal$140,587,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
12 y 41 dLevinsons8 years/$110M (2014-21)

Details
  • 8 years/$110M (2014-21). Signed extension with Boston 7/23/13, replacing final year and option in previous contract. $1M signing bonus. 14:$12.5M, 15:$12.5M, 16:$13M, 17:$15M, 18:$16M, 19:$15M, 20:$13M, 21:$12M. Undisclosed amount of money to be deferred. Limited no-trade clause. First $100 million contract for a second baseman.
  • 6 years/$40.5M (2009-14), plus 2015 club option. Signed extension with Boston 12/3/08. $1.5M signing bonus. 09:$1.5M, 10:$3.5M, 11:$5.5M, 12:$8M, 13:$10M, 14:$10M, 15:$11M, $0.5M buyout. Trade voids club option. escalators based on MVP vote: MVP in 2009-13 increases 2014 and 2015 salaries by $2M each. 2nd or 3rd place in 2009-13 MVP votes increases 2014 and 2015 salaries by $1M each (up to maximum of twice, for $2M increase). 2015 club option and buyout are voided if Pedroia wins MVP in 2008 (met) and is traded. Award bonuses: $50,000 each for All Star, Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, LCS MVP. $0.1M for WS MVP. $0.1M for MVP ($75,000 for 2nd in vote, $50,000 for 3rd). Perks: suite on road.
  • 1 year/$0.457M (2008). Re-signed by Boston 2/08.
  • 1 year/$0.38M (2007). Re-signed by Boston 3/07.
  • 1 year (2006). Contract purchased by Boston 8/06.
  • Drafted by Boston 2004 (2-65) (Arizona State). $0.575M signing bonus.

2019 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG DRC+ VORP FRAA WARP
90o 262 34 76 14 1 5 30 30 30 3 2 .333 .414 .469 139 22.9 2B 0 2.4
80o 241 30 67 12 1 5 27 27 29 2 1 .318 .398 .455 130 17.8 2B 0 1.9
70o 225 27 61 11 1 4 24 24 27 2 1 .308 .384 .434 124 14.4 2B 0 1.5
60o 212 25 56 10 1 4 22 22 26 2 1 .299 .374 .428 119 11.8 2B 0 1.2
50o 200 23 51 9 1 4 21 20 25 2 1 .288 .362 .418 114 9.5 2B 0 1.0
40o 188 21 46 8 1 3 19 18 24 2 1 .275 .348 .389 109 7.5 2B 0 0.8
30o 175 19 43 8 1 3 17 17 23 1 1 .276 .349 .397 104 5.5 2B 0 0.6
20o 159 16 37 7 0 3 15 15 21 1 1 .259 .331 .371 98 3.4 2B 0 0.3
10o 138 14 29 5 0 2 12 12 19 1 1 .234 .304 .323 90 1.1 2B 0 0.1
Weighted Mean2062454101421212621.297.371.42911610.52B 01.1

Preseason Long-Term Forecast (Beyond the 2019 Projections)

Playing time estimates are based on performance, not Depth Charts.
Year Age PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB AVG OBP SLG DRC+ WARP VORP BRR POS_ADJ REP_ADJ RAA FRAA
202036222265310132222281.271.347.3821080.88.0-1.10.65.72.7-0.5
20213710912255021011140.262.340.3681030.33.0-0.60.32.80.5-0.2
202238587143016670.266.344.3741060.21.8-0.30.11.50.5-0.1
20233925351002230.264.339.3731040.10.7-0.10.10.60.1-0.1
20244022251002230.260.337.3661020.10.6-0.10.00.60.1-0.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index 79)

Rank Score Name Year DRC+ Trend
1 94 Mark Loretta 2007 88
2 93 Red Schoendienst 1958 80
3 90 Frankie Frisch 1933 114
4 88 David Eckstein 2010 79
5 87 Ian Kinsler 2017 102
6 85 Johnny Temple 1963 103
7 83 Placido Polanco 2011 94
8 83 Marco Scutaro 2011 109
9 83 Fernando Vina 2004 76
10 83 Willie Randolph 1990 93
11 83 Eric Young 2002 87
12 82 Jimmy Rollins 2014 110
13 82 Brandon Phillips 2016 97
14 82 Johnny Pesky 1954 77
15 82 Orlando Hudson 2013 0 DNP
16 82 Carney Lansford 1992 102
17 82 Mark Ellis 2012 93
18 81 Rafael Furcal 2013 0 DNP
19 81 Yunel Escobar 2018 0 DNP
20 81 Eddie Collins 1922 108
21 81 Nellie Fox 1963 77
22 81 Buddy Bell 1987 112
23 80 Tony Graffanino 2007 97
24 80 Jamey Carroll 2009 90
25 80 Ozzie Smith 1990 83
26 80 Craig Counsell 2006 74
27 80 Bill Doran 1993 80
28 80 Solly Hemus 1958 107
29 80 Nick Punto 2013 81
30 79 Roberto Alomar 2003 84
31 79 Nomar Garciaparra 2009 95
32 79 Bobby Avila 1959 83
33 79 Ben Zobrist 2016 119
34 79 Frank Catalanotto 2009 88
35 79 Adam Kennedy 2011 84
36 79 Bill Madlock 1986 102
37 79 Alan Trammell 1993 130
38 79 Tim Raines 1995 115
39 79 Jimmy Johnston 1925 104
40 79 Shannon Stewart 2009 0 DNP
41 78 Jerry Lumpe 1968 0 DNP
42 78 Tony Gwynn 1995 128
43 78 Aaron Hill 2017 78
44 78 Orlando Cabrera 2010 86
45 78 Cal Ripken Jr. 1996 107
46 78 Keith Lockhart 2000 74
47 78 Don Mattingly 1996 0 DNP
48 78 Luis Castillo 2011 0 DNP
49 78 Alex Cora 2011 73
50 78 Harvey Kuenn 1966 90
51 78 Sam Rice 1925 101
52 78 Jim Gilliam 1964 89
53 77 Billy Goodman 1961 91
54 77 Tommy Helms 1976 108
55 77 Ray Durham 2007 81
56 77 Shane Victorino 2016 0 DNP
57 77 George Kell 1958 0 DNP
58 77 Jose Reyes 2018 72
59 77 Robinson Cano 2018 125
60 77 Cookie Rojas 1974 87
61 77 Pete Rose 1976 134
62 77 Lance Johnson 1999 73
63 77 Jeff Frye 2002 0 DNP
64 77 Taffy Wright 1947 119
65 77 Rip Radcliff 1941 87
66 77 Bill Spiers 2001 93
67 77 Del Pratt 1923 81
68 77 Bernie Allen 1974 0 DNP
69 77 Coco Crisp 2015 74
70 77 Bill Mueller 2006 97
71 76 Tom Herr 1991 94
72 76 Lenny Green 1968 94
73 76 Andy High 1933 82
74 76 Spike Owen 1996 0 DNP
75 76 Todd Walker 2008 0 DNP
76 76 Horace Clarke 1975 0 DNP
77 76 Scott Hatteberg 2005 89
78 76 Paul Lo Duca 2007 85
79 76 Lloyd Waner 1941 82
80 76 Dick Groat 1966 84
81 76 Brady Clark 2008 77
82 76 Pie Traynor 1934 96
83 76 Jack Tobin 1927 96
84 76 Cesar Tovar 1976 70
85 76 Matty Alou 1974 67
86 75 Dick McAuliffe 1975 67
87 75 Smoky Burgess 1962 119
88 75 Al Spangler 1969 82
89 75 Dave Roberts 2007 81
90 75 Mike Lowell 2009 102
91 75 Skip Schumaker 2015 70
92 75 Lou Finney 1946 89
93 75 Craig Biggio 2001 115
94 75 Julio Lugo 2011 65
95 75 Marty McManus 1935 0 DNP
96 75 Craig Grebeck 2000 94
97 75 Denny Walling 1989 105
98 75 Doug Mientkiewicz 2009 76
99 75 Bill Buckner 1985 101
100 75 Peanuts Lowrey 1953 88

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2019  Due to publishing agreements, the 2019 player comments and team essays are only available in the Baseball Prospectus 2019 book (available in hardcopy, and soon e-book and Kindle).
2018 Way back in 2007, Pedroia ended any hopes Alex Cora had at remaining an everyday player, emerging to become the AL Rookie of the Year. Now it might be time for Cora to end Pedroia’s everyday-player status in return. Boston’s preeminent sparkplug has averaged just 121 games over the past four years, battling injuries to his hands, wrists, hamstrings and now most seriously to his knee. We’d heard reports that Pedroia’s left knee was balky even before Manny Machado slammed into it in April. Who knows exactly how much damage that slide did, but Pedroia’s knee worsened to the point where he needed offseason surgery to repair it. The most optimistic estimates suggest he won’t return to action until May or June.

Even if Pedroia were slated to start 2018 on time, Cora would be wise to make some changes because Pedroia looks every bit the part of a 34-year-old second baseman. He is now a below-average runner, his unfailing belief that he can always take the extra bag adding to Boston’s overall base-running malaise. FRAA has his glove at just around average, and while the eye test suggests he might still be a tick better, he’s no longer elite (though some metrics disagree). Couple those losses with power output that fluctuates between “surprisingly decent” and “almost nonexistent,” and Pedroia's once well-rounded skill set has quickly whittled down to his eye at the plate and his preternatural bat-to-ball ability.

When healthy, Pedroia is still good enough to play often for a contender. He can still reach base at a solid clip, make some splash plays on the dirt and provide on-field leadership. But time waits for no man, and it is especially cruel to second basemen. Pedroia no longer belongs in the top third of a good lineup, and he should no longer be asked or expected to play every day. He needs time off. He needs time at DH. And he needs to admit when his injuries limit his effectiveness. Everything we know about Pedroia suggests he won’t enjoy this new reality, but perhaps he can remember the example his new manager set for him back in 2007. For the good of his own career and the good of the Red Sox’s chances through the end of his contract in 2021, he needs to.
2017 Pedroia has probably never heard of the typical aging curve for second basemen, but if you told him about it, he’d most definitely recommend sticking it up your you-know-where. In his age-32 season, the personification of all things grit posted his best offensive season since 2013, produced the second-highest batting average of his illustrious career and hit the ball harder than in any season since he won Rookie of the Year. Pedroia is no longer a force on the basepaths and his defense has declined from legendary to just good. However, by learning to hit leadoff—a role he’s admitted he hates—he’s reinvented himself to fit in perfectly with the new Killer Bs-led Red Sox. He’s got five years left on his contract, but maybe that’s not such a bad thing because Pedroia proved last season that when healthy (yes, that’s a big when) he’s still one of the game’s better middle infielders.
2016 Pedroia was on pace to have one of his better offensive seasons in recent history until a hamstring injury forced him to the DL in late June. The Muddy Chicken pushed himself to return in mid-July, but he clearly pushed too hard, re-aggravating the injury after six games and subsequently missing the next six weeks. When healthy, Pedroia showed surprising power, and he could have challenged for 20 bombs for the first time since since 2011 if he had received 600-plus PA. Unfortunately Pedroia also took a small step back in the field, proved that his base-stealing days are over and missed at least 20 games for the third time in the past five seasons. We knew all about second basemen and aging curves when he signed his eight-year extension in 2014. Pedroia still has the hit tool, glove and low AAV to make that deal look good, but we may need to start referencing his contract as “merely good” rather than “a massive steal” for the Red Sox. That's still a hell of a thing, and he is poised to remain an impact contributor even if, thanks to Mookie Betts and Xander Bogaerts, he's no longer Boston's best overall player.
2015 The New England Patriots have convinced Bostonians that following The Patriot Way—a kind moniker for the method by which they unceremoniously dump old, expensive players—is the only way to win. It's why people clamored for Jimmy Garoppolo after two bad games from Tom Brady, and it's why some wondered out loud if the Red Sox would be better of trading Pedroia and going with Mookie Betts at second base. That's a very silly idea. Sure, Pedroia is no longer the 20-steal, 20-homer threat he was in his mid-20s, as his power has unquestionably diminished. Yet he's still an elite defender, he still sees a ton of pitches per plate appearance and he's still potent at the plate when healthy. The “when healthy” caveat is a big one, and the day when we debate whether Pedroia should still be a top-of-the-order hitter might be closer than the Sox would prefer. But he's on an insanely team-friendly contract, can still post several 4-plus WARP seasons and is exactly the type of baseball nut you want around to help groom younger players. Boston doesn't deserve nice things.
2014 There are two items from 2013 that tell you just about everything you need to know about Pedroia. The first came on Opening Day, when he tore the ulnar collateral ligament in his thumb against the Yankees. Pedroia refused surgery once doctors told him he wouldn't cause further damage by playing, and that his level of play depended on his pain tolerance: Pedroia would finish with his third-best season by WARP while missing just two games. The second item is the extension he signed mid-season: Pedroia agreed to an eight-year, $110 million deal. When asked about the money he left on the table, Pedroia said, "I want to make sure the team I'm on wins more games than the other team's second baseman." (He probably meant "than the other second baseman's team," but dammit, Jim, he's a ballplayer, not an English professor.) The extraordinarily team-friendly annual price of his contract, combined with his continuous excellence, makes that dream a realistic possibility.
2013 Pedroias down year (by his standards) was due to a torn adductor muscle in his thumb suffered in early May and aggravated later in the month. He played through it before finally hitting the DL in July. After returning, the laser show resumed to the tune of .318/.372/.508 for the rest of the season. As for his gold glove defense (as opposed to Gold Glove defense), Pedroia still passes the eye test and nine out of 10 metrics agree, even if FRAA was the dissenter. He fractured his finger with three games left in the season, but even though the Red Sox were 23 games out of first place, he played the final two, going 4-for-11 with two doubles. Whether that was gutty or stupid depends on your point of view, but in the maelstrom of disappointment, ego, and blood-in-the-water media coverage that was the Red Sox' 2012, it made a point. When he's on the field, Pedroia is the centerpiece of the franchise. Now if only he can stay healthy.
2012 Pedroia returned from his injury-shortened 2010 campaign and surgery that inserted a screw into his foot to put up a season that made it seem like he never left. After slugging just .331 through May, Pedroia made every ball that came near the plate sorry for the transgression afterward, hitting .340/.405/.543 over his last 485 plate appearances, shoving himself in the middle of an MVP race that involved three different Red Sox hitters. Throw in his fine defensive work at second, and it's no wonder that the team is often at its best whenever Pedroia is too... September notwithstanding.
2011 Before succumbing to a broken foot that would later end his season, Pedroia was hitting .292/.370/.502, and was one game removed from a three-homer, five-hit performance against the Rockies. The Red Sox were just two games out of first place and tied for the wild card at the time of his demise, and while losing their diminutive second baseman didn't doom their playoff pursuit to failure, it played as large a role as any other injury. Pedroia and the Red Sox chose surgery, and a screw was inserted into his foot to aid the recovery process. Now entering his age-27 campaign, there is potential for a monster year here.
2010 In his follow-up to his MVP season, Pedroia lost 30 points of batting average, an additional 15 points of slugging, and saw his success rate on the bases drop to 71 percent. Thats more an indication of how good he was in 2008 than anything else. That he shed so little power is a good sign, particularly as the drop was largely the result of a likely fluky poor showing against lefties. Meanwhile, his strikeout/walk ratio jumped off the charts, as he drew 1.6 walks for every strikeout thereby maintaining his on-base percentage despite the drop in average. He was also good in the field, even ranking second among AL second basemen in UZR for the second year in a row. Still shy of his natural peak, Pedroia has affirmed his status as one of the games elite talents.
2009 Pedroia's nabbing Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player awards in consecutive seasons is a nifty trick, one that puts him alongside Cal Ripken, Jr. and Ryan Howard as the only players to accomplish the feat. He also had more doubles (54) than punchouts (52); he's the seventh player since 1977 with a minimum of 50 doubles to pull that off. Though Pedroia was far more productive at home.344/.393/.519 with 35 of those doubleshe was no slouch on the road, with an impressive .309/.359/.468 that many teams would kill to get out of their second baseman. Pedroia's numbers lack any kind of BABIP-related concerns, meaning that as long as he keeps on using Fenway to his advantage, he's going to put up impressive campaigns at the plate.
2008 Pedroia's Rookie of the Year season almost never was. After a .182/.308/.236 April, he was losing playing time to Alex Cora as May began. On a road trip to Minnesota and Toronto, he went 9-for-14, saving his job, and by June he was established as a regular hitting in one of the top two lineup spots. He should have more walks and thus a higher OBP in him, but could lose some power, most of which is a Fenway effect (.151 ISO at home, .098 on the road).
2007 This PECOTA favorite tends to excite statheads more than scouts. The former cite his impressive plate discipline and gap power--a good offensive package for a middle infielder--while the latter caution against his small size, unimpressive speed, and lack of the arm strength or range to play shortstop. But really, it`s a question of degree; he should be a very good middle infielder in the majors for years to come. Overcoming a slow start (.261/.352/.359 through May), Pedroia put up very good numbers in Pawtucket, walking nearly twice as often as he struck out and continuing to show gap power. With Hanley Ramirez traded to Florida, he moved back to shortstop and didn`t embarrass himself there; he also saw considerable time at second base, his likely role with the Sox in 2007.
2006 The team`s first pick in the 2004 draft, Pedroia sped through four levels to get to the doorstop of the major leagues. He played shortstop at Arizona State, but the team moved him to second base last year, pairing him with Hanley Ramirez in Portland. His only above-average tool is his bat, but he continues to impress with it. His hitting slowed down at bit in Pawtucket when he was hit by a pitch in the left wrist. Pedroia was due to compete for the second base job before the Mark Loretta acquisition. He might see time back at shortstop, but more likely will spend a full year at Pawtucket.
2005 The first pick by the Sox in the 2004 draft, Pedroia was a superstar at Arizona State, All-Pac-10 all three seasons, once Pac-10 player of the year, and twice National Defensive Player of the Year. He slipped to the Sox at 65th overall because he's only 5'8", but the organization loves him. Though he won't show much power, he hits for a high average and keeps his walks up. His pro debut saw him blitz through the Sally League before performing well at high-A Sarasota. The presence of the newly signed Edgar Renteria and Hanley Ramirez plus Pedroia's size mean his future is most likely on the other side of second. He could quickly turn into the player everyone in Anaheim thought David Eckstein was.

BP Articles

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BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2019-02-25 16:00:00 (link to chat)Does Nick Madrigal see the Majors this year? If so, what do you expect from him?
(Buddy from Peoria, IL)
Probably not. You will dream of Dustin Pedroia, you will get, I dunno, right-handed Joe Panik? (Jon Hegglund)
2017-05-22 23:00:00 (link to chat)Is Dustin Pedroia a good playing style comparison for Bo Bichette at peak development?
(JJ83 from Toronto)
Laser Show ain't a good playing style comp for literally *anyone*, ever. Guy's a lunatic, in the best possible way. I can see where you're coming from, though. (Wilson Karaman)
2016-08-01 16:00:00 (link to chat)Is Moncada have the tools move to third until Pedroia is done in 3-4 years at 2B?
(caseyj15 from Medford, OR)
Yes. While shifting to any new position isn't as "automatic" as some casual observers suggest, Yoan Moncada would likely be fine at third base until Dustin Pedroia was done there. (Mike Gianella)
2016-03-14 14:30:00 (link to chat)I have always seen Jose Altuve as a mini Dustin Pedroia, if that is possible.
(oldbopper from New Britain, CT)
Fun question: who embellishes more when they list their height?

Skills wise, they're pretty different players. Excellent second basemen, but they ply their crafts very differently. (Brendan Gawlowski)
2016-01-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)The prospects series are great, thanks. I'm asking about a guy who is a couple of years removed from being a prospect and isn't setting the baseball world alight yet, Kolten Wong. I enjoy the way he plays the game and was rooting for him to be the next Dustin Pedroia, so his big second-half slump in 2015 was rather disappointing. Is there still projection there for him and what can he become?
(Kalimantan from Cornwall)
I've always been lower on Wong -- and outside of position he and Pedroia couldn't be much more different -- but I still do believe he's an everyday second baseman even with the struggles in the second half. Still a good approach, still a solid defender. Just not gonna be a guy you want hitting at the top of the lineup. Not for me, anyway. (Christopher Crawford)
2015-07-16 20:00:00 (link to chat)Is Joe Panik a taller slightly less toolsy Dustin Pedroia? They seem remarkably similar to me.
(Eric from LA)
Oh man. Player comps...Ahhhhhh...I really like Joe Panik. Pedroia had more power I feel like at a younger age. Different hitters but I see the same guy defensively, I do. (George Bissell)
2015-06-16 20:00:00 (link to chat)If the Red Sox were characters on Game of Thrones, who would they be? thanks
(Bill from Los Angeles)
This is super played out ...

... and as such, right in my wheelhouse.

Xander Bogaerts: Jon Snow
Mookie Betts: Danaerys Targaryen

Ben Cherington: Ned (tried to do the right thing, will probably lose head)
Wade Miley: Catelyn (doesn't do much but yell)
Rick Porcello: Robb Stark (handsome, ineffective)
Clay Buchholz: Sansa (WHAT EVEN ARE YOU?)
Eduardo Rodriguez: Arya (so much potential)
Brock Holt: Bran (takes a lot of forms)
Joe Kelly: Rickon (why do you exist?)
Mike Napoli: Hodor (...yep)
Christian Vazquez: Benjen Stark (plz come back)

John Henry: Tywin (still calling the shots)
Dustin Pedroia: Tyrion (most watchable/resourceful)
Larry Lucchino: Cersei (...)
David Ortiz: Jaime (lost a step but still badass)
Blake Swihart: Tommen (keep trying, little guy)

John Farrell: Stannis (stern but no one seems to listen)
Melisandre: Pablo Sandoval (is your power real or what)
Our Hopes/Dreams: Shireen

Hanley Ramirez: The Hound (unlikeable but powerful)
Koji Uehara: Brienne (still rooting for ya)
Daniel Nava: Pod (you too!)

Junichi Tawawa: Bronn (just gets stuff done)
Allen Craig: Janos Slynt (just doesn't)
Shane Victorino: Jorah (always hurt)
Jackie Bradley: Theon (has he not suffered enough?)
Justin Masterson: Beric Dondarrion (should not have been revived)

Craig Breslow: Doran (smart, ineffective)
Alejandro De Aza: sandsnake 1
Alexi Ogando: sandsnake 2
Tommy Layne: sandsnake 3

The Yankees: Roose Bolton
The Rays: Ramsay Bolton
The Blue Jays: The Night's King
The Orioles: Mance Rayder

And two for the book readers ...
Yoan Moncada: Young Griff
Rusney Castillo: Patchface (Ben Carsley)
2015-06-10 14:00:00 (link to chat)Who are your favorite buy/sell targets right now? Maybe 1 hitter and 1 pitcher to each buy/sell on?
(Shawn from Cubicle)
Ian Desmond is my favorite "buy" target for hitters. Carlos Carrasco for pitchers. In terms of selling, I'd be cashing out on someone like Dustin Pedroia and Ubaldo Jimenez. I'd also sell hard on Nick Martinez, but I'm not sure you'll get much value for him. (J.P. Breen)
2014-10-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)You've seen a lot of Dilson Herrera, both toward the beginning of the year and as he's made adjustments during its course. The swing isn't orthodox but at this point it clearly works. To what degree is Herrera's lack of quick-twitch athleticism going to limit his upside going forward? Some people have casually compared him to Dustin Pedroia back when Pedroia was similarly valued as a minor league player, but it seems to me that the latter guy (even back then) had much better athleticism in the batter's box. I'm still not convinced Herrera is even a league-average second baseman (although one more good year should win me over). Your thoughts?
(JD from New York)
Herrera was one of the most interesting prospects I saw this season because of the improvement he made from March to September. I saw him in spring training and noted that he was a good athlete still learning how to play baseball. I actually like his athleticism very much. His swing had issues though. I saw him early in the season and it was better but still inconsistent, though he was barreling the ball up pretty well. The next time St. Lucie came to town a few months later, the swing was much more refined and consistent and he hit everything in sight hard. Obviously, he kept getting better, torched Double-A and made it to the majors. If he continues to make improvements, he can be an everyday second baseman. If not, I think he falls into a utility role (I think he'd make a solid outfielder). I'm not convinced that he's an everyday 2B either, but I'm a lot closer to being convinced of it than I was this time last year. Another solid month or two in Triple-A will do it for me. I think he's earned shot to prove he can't do it, at the very least. (Jeff Moore)
2014-07-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is Dustin Pedroia and good comp for Rougned Odor or is that more on the optimistic side? Both play with a lot of intensity, power in the 15-20 HR range, 35-40 doubles, hit between 280 - .300? Pedroia may strikeout less, but, to me, those seem like reasonable numbers for Odor.
(Lorenzo from Jacksonville)
Giving anyone that comp would be VERY optimistic. Probably more Omar Infante, but perfect world stuff would be the Pedroia stuff (Paul Sporer)
2014-06-26 14:00:00 (link to chat)Help on a trade proposed: Give George Springer for Dustin Pedroia? 10-team/12 Keeper Standard league....and generally what 2Bs would you target in dynasty leagues?
(pmitchell60 from NOLA)
I'm not making this trade. I'm worried about Pedroia. He's on the wrong side of thirty, the homers have declined as his fly-ball rate has declined, and he's not running this year. I wouldn't feel comfortable giving up a top-tier talent like Springer for that profile.

In dynasty leagues, I'd be very interested in Jason Kipnis right now, as his price is likely lower than it should be. (J.P. Breen)
2013-11-25 13:00:00 (link to chat)Kolten Wong - the next Dustin Pedroia, or the next Fernando Vina (I'm not implying PEDs, FWIW)? Much thanks.
(Dan from Idaho )
Closer to Vina (Jason Parks)
2010-09-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)Please fill in the blank. This is the best NL Rookie Class since ________ (blank). Thanks! Bobby
(Bobby from New York)
Are we going strictly by league? Because the 2007 class had Ryan Braun, Troy Tulowitzki, Dustin Pedroia and Josh Hamilton among hitters, Tim Lincecum and Joakim Soria among pitchers. 2006 had Hanley Ramirez, Ryan Zimmerman, Andre Ethier, Prince Fielder, Ian Kinsler, Francisco Liriano, Justin Verlander, Jered Weaver, Josh Johnson, Matt Cain, Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon (who used to not suck), Jonathan Broxton (ditto)...

There's a lot to be excited about with this year's rookie class (Posey, Heyward, Santana, Stanton) but I'm in no rush to appoint them the best class of the past five years until I see much more. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-03-08 13:00:00 (link to chat)How much does the type of workouts players do during the off season matter? For example, Evan Longoria concentrated on his hamstrings/glutes during the winter. Is this more of an overreaction to the previous year or something likely to prevent recurrences in the future? (or, more likely, depends on the individual and workouts in question?)
(Stephanie from DC)
Great question. Bypassing the easy joke about Longoria, it's an interesting point that we know so little about the off-season workouts. They're actually a new innovation. Players used to WORK during the offseason. Yogi Berra was a maitre d' early in his career. Mickey Mantle I think sold cars. Since so many are done ad hoc and followed only "light touch" by the teams, there's very little data. Mostly we get people following on someone's success. Lots of Red Sox go to API in Arizona because Dustin Pedroia was an advocate and won an MVP. (Will Carroll)
2010-02-26 13:00:00 (link to chat)I'm surprised you didn't put Brian Barton on that well-read list. His mind is reportedly ... interesting. But how about the other extreme? I once read that the ideal athlete, for coachability purposes, has "slightly above average" intelligence. The reasoning is that the very bright ones may resist coaching because of their own ideas, and the dim ones never "get" what they're supposed to be taught. Does that fit your observations? Without naming names, have you ever dealt with players who left you thinking, "Man, how can somebody this dumb ever play major-league baseball?"
(Bill from New Mexico)
Barton is absolutely someone who belongs on such a list. This is a great example of: I wish more people sent in questions ahead of time so I could think about my answers rather than just respond off the top of my head.

Have I ever walked away thinking,"Man, how can somebody this dumb ever play major-league baseball?" I've walked away thinking someone isn't a MENSA cnadidate, but hell, being dumb might sometimes help you play baseball. Or even pretending that you're dumb. Dustin Pedroia might fit that category. He gives a lot of mundane non answers to questions and claims to pay zero attention to stats. Bullcrap. Dustin Pedroia knows every one of his numbers short of maybe VORP. (David Laurila)
2010-02-18 14:00:00 (link to chat)Scott Sizemore - The last 2B prospect I remember getting such high marks on being "scrappy" was Dustin Pedroia. And their minor league numbers aren't mindblowingly different. Any reason why Sizemore can't succeed as Pedroia did?
(ericmilburn from San Francisco)
Because I could pull out 26 guys with that Pedroia profile, and we'd end up with just one Dustin Pedroia. That said, I actually really like Sizemore and think he could hit .270-280 this year with 10-12 home runs and 30 doubles, and that's pretty good. (Kevin Goldstein)
2010-02-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Given your fandom, do you find you end up with more or less Red Sox on your fantasy teams each year?
(Hammer from Pumps & A Bump)
I don't think I draft very many Red Sox players at all. Padres, either. I feel like I'm double-rooting for them, and that's just too much pressure.

I find it easier to root for James Shields to throw eight scoreless against Boston and have Tampa Bay's bullpen blow it in the ninth than it is to count on Dustin Pedroia to win it for two teams. (Marc Normandin)
2009-03-25 13:00:00 (link to chat)Whose "minor" injury has you most concerned?
(Jake from Chicago)
Cole Hamels. Dustin Pedroia is a close second, for the reasons I have in today's THR. (Will Carroll)
2009-02-16 14:00:00 (link to chat)On the 20-80 scale...how would you rate all of Dustin Pedroia's tools? Does a 55 sound about right? Above average tools but once those excellent intangibles are factored in he becomes a top 2B in the league??
(Albert Einstein from Heaven)
Would you really put a 55 on his hit tool? That's a 70-plus, easy. (Kevin Goldstein)
2008-10-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is this as good as Dustin Pedroia gets or are we seeing the beginning of something great?
(mattymatty from Philly)
Based on nothing other than instinct -- I haven't seen the new PECOTA comps yet or anything (Nate is still busy with OBAMA comps) -- I suspect that this is who he is, and if it isn't something great, it's pretty darned close. As I've said many times, he's one of the most entertaining players in baseball to watch. (Steven Goldman)
2008-09-09 13:30:00 (link to chat)How ridiculous and disappointing is the talk of Dustin Pedroia as AL MVP?
(KerryFam4 from ATL)
There's just so few candidates--they keep getting hurt--that it's almost natural to focus on the guys who's still playing and playing well for a good team. I can understand the discussion, and frankly, I expect the AL MVP to be a random these days, anyway. Pedroia will end up top six or so in most metrics, and probably the best player on his team (him or Youkilis) so he's not Justin Morneau, 2006. (Joe Sheehan)
2008-07-24 13:00:00 (link to chat)Does the recent hot streak make you think differently about Dustin Pedroia going forward? Theres not much time in the majors to look at so I wonder if he's taking a step forward or if this is just one of those blips that happens over the course of 162. Thanks, Ms. Kahrl.
(mattymatty from Philly)
It would be somewhat ironic if we had the new Bobby Grich on our hands, yet we in the analysis community shrank from identifying him until he already made it imminent. (Christina Kahrl)
2008-04-17 13:00:00 (link to chat)Sorry about that felix pie projection, I just have a sweet tooth.
(PECOTA from parts unknown)
Did someone change the rules when I wasn't looking and decide that if a ballplayer has an underwhelming first 200 at-bats in a major league uniform when he's 22/23, he's completely done as a major league prospect? Yes, there's the Soriano injury now to force Lou's hand, but the Cubs just needed to commit to giving him 500 at-bats in a major league uniform this year, no questions asked. That's what the Red Sox were prepared to do with Dustin Pedroia last year, and that turned out very well for him. That's what organizations like the Braves, who know how to develop talent, do with their players. (Nate Silver)
2008-01-31 13:00:00 (link to chat)Any regrets on last year's list or does some amount of acceptable error always enter into any process no matter how well refined?
(LindInMoskva from DC)
Sure, there are always going to be mistakes. Last year's list had two major ones, and both were makeup related, on both ends of the spectrum.

1. Dustin Pedroia
2. Justin Upton (Kevin Goldstein)
2008-01-29 16:00:00 (link to chat)how good can Jed Lowrie be offensively? any comparisons?
(Randall from Boston)
This probably doesn't work on a scouting level, but on a pure statistical basis he reminds me a lot of Dustin Pedroia - great college career, lots of walks and extra-base hits in the minors despite not a lot of home runs. Pedroia hit .293/.385/.452 between AA and AAA in 2005; Lowrie hit .298/.393/.503 between AA and AAA last year, but was about 18 months older.

Like Pedroia, I think Lowrie's going to be stretched to play shortstop, but could be an above-average second baseman for a long time. (Rany Jazayerli)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2010-07-13 16:30:00All-Star Game"Red Carpet Show" repeat on MLB channel, showing a parade of ballplayers at Disneyland."Fans just can't get enough" says the host. Actually, as a frequent Disney visitor, the PITA about parades is that they crowd up the sidewalks and you can't navigate to any of the rides. OTOH, Kevin Millar remarking that "It's a Small World" is "Dustin Pedroia's house" is kind of funny. (Steven Goldman)
 

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