Biographical

Portrait of Matt Barnes

Matt Barnes P  

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2019 Projections (Rest of Season Projections - seasonal age 29)
IP ERA WHIP SO W L SV WARP
48.7 2.50 1.25 63 2 2 21 1.2
Birth Date6-17-1990
Height6' 4"
Weight210 lbs
Age28 years, 10 months, 6 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
-0.12015
0.22016
1.52017
1.92018
1.22019
proj
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
2014 BOS MLB 5 0 9.0 0 0 0 11 2 8 1 104 11.0 2.0 1.0 8.0 34% .357 1.44 3.49 4.00 98 4.73 115.9 0.0
2015 BOS MLB 32 2 43.0 3 4 0 56 15 39 9 111 11.7 3.1 1.9 8.2 42% .351 1.65 5.19 5.44 107 4.99 116.5 -0.1
2016 BOS MLB 62 0 66.7 4 3 1 62 31 71 6 114 8.4 4.2 0.8 9.6 46% .318 1.40 3.67 4.05 100 4.68 103.6 0.2
2017 BOS MLB 70 0 69.7 7 3 1 57 28 83 7 105 7.4 3.6 0.9 10.7 50% .298 1.22 3.30 3.88 80 3.30 70.1 1.5
2018 BOS MLB 62 0 61.7 6 4 0 47 31 96 5 106 6.9 4.5 0.7 14.0 53% .321 1.26 2.74 3.65 62 2.21 49.3 1.9
2019 BOS MLB 9 0 9.3 2 0 1 5 2 19 2 100 4.8 1.9 1.9 18.3 60% .231 0.75 2.80 2.89 0 0.00 0.0 0.0
CareerMLB2402259.322143238109316301088.33.81.011.047%.3201.343.564.10843.6080.53.5

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg LG G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
2012 GRN A SAL 5 5 26.7 2 0 0 12 4 42 0 99 4.1 1.4 0.0 14.2 60% .240 0.60 0.99 0.34 0 0.00 0.0
2012 SLM A+ CAR 20 20 93.0 5 5 0 85 25 91 6 96 8.2 2.4 0.6 8.8 47% .312 1.18 3.33 3.58 0 0.00 0.0
2013 PME AA EAS 24 24 108.0 5 10 0 112 46 135 11 101 9.3 3.8 0.9 11.3 46% .356 1.46 3.53 4.33 0 0.00 0.0
2013 PAW AAA INT 1 1 5.3 1 0 0 3 2 7 0 97 5.1 3.4 0.0 11.8 45% .273 0.94 1.70 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
2014 BOS MLB AL 5 0 9.0 0 0 0 11 2 8 1 104 11.0 2.0 1.0 8.0 34% .357 1.44 3.49 4.00 98 4.73 115.9
2014 PAW AAA INT 23 22 127.7 8 9 0 119 46 103 8 96 8.4 3.2 0.6 7.3 44% .294 1.29 3.70 3.95 105 3.77 80.7
2015 BOS MLB AL 32 2 43.0 3 4 0 56 15 39 9 111 11.7 3.1 1.9 8.2 42% .351 1.65 5.19 5.44 107 4.99 116.5
2015 PAW AAA INT 17 5 37.7 1 1 0 36 22 41 3 90 8.6 5.3 0.7 9.8 42% .320 1.54 3.84 4.06 101 3.73 76.9
2016 BOS MLB AL 62 0 66.7 4 3 1 62 31 71 6 114 8.4 4.2 0.8 9.6 46% .318 1.40 3.67 4.05 100 4.68 103.6
2017 BOS MLB AL 70 0 69.7 7 3 1 57 28 83 7 105 7.4 3.6 0.9 10.7 50% .298 1.22 3.30 3.88 80 3.30 70.1
2017 PME AA EAS 1 1 1.0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 102 9.0 9.0 0.0 9.0 67% .333 2.00 4.22 0.00 99 3.18 66.9
2018 BOS MLB AL 62 0 61.7 6 4 0 47 31 96 5 106 6.9 4.5 0.7 14.0 53% .321 1.26 2.74 3.65 62 2.21 49.3
2019 BOS MLB AL 9 0 9.3 2 0 1 5 2 19 2 100 4.8 1.9 1.9 18.3 60% .231 0.75 2.80 2.89 0 0.00 0.0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr%
2014 156 0.5192 0.5449 0.7647 0.6667 0.4133 0.8704 0.5806 0.2353
2015 790 0.5215 0.4810 0.7711 0.6553 0.2910 0.8444 0.5909 0.2289
2016 1189 0.4634 0.4197 0.7174 0.5898 0.2727 0.8185 0.5287 0.2826
2017 1201 0.4471 0.4321 0.6936 0.6387 0.2651 0.8105 0.4659 0.3064
2018 1108 0.4341 0.4106 0.6352 0.5925 0.2711 0.7719 0.4059 0.3648
2019 163 0.3988 0.4847 0.6076 0.6308 0.3878 0.8293 0.3684 0.3924
Career46070.46170.43780.69840.61850.28230.81180.48950.3016

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2014-04-01 2014-04-25 Minors 24 0 Right Shoulder Recovery From Previous Injury Inflammation - -
2014-03-03 2014-03-31 Camp 28 0 Right Shoulder Inflammation - -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2019 BOS $1,600,000
2018 BOS $605,000
2017 BOS $563,500
2016 BOS $511,000
2015 BOS $
YearsDescriptionSalary
3 yrPrevious$1,679,500
2019Current$1,600,000
4 yrPvs + Cur$3,279,500
4 yrTotal$3,279,500

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
3 y 110 dISE Baseball1 year/$1.6M (2019)

Details
  • 1 year/$1.6M (2019). Re-signed by Boston 1/11/19 (avoided arbitration).
  • 1 year/$0.605M (2018). Re-signed by Boston 3/18.
  • 1 year (2017). Re-signed by Boston 3/17.
  • 1 year/$0.511M (2016). Re-signed by Boston 3/2/16.
  • 1 year/$0.5085M (2015). Re-signed by Boston 3/8/15.
  • 1 year (2014). Contract selected by Boston 9/8/14.
  • Drafted by Boston 2011 (1-19) (Connecticut). $1.5M signing bonus.

2019 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
90o 2.6 2 21 46 0 65.3 42 24 84 4 .261 1.00 1.59 1.99 15.8 1.7
80o 2.6 2 21 46 0 59.4 41 23 76 3 .276 1.08 1.89 2.35 13.9 1.5
70o 2.5 2.1 21 46 0 55.3 40 23 71 3 .286 1.14 2.12 2.62 12.5 1.4
60o 2.5 2.1 21 46 0 51.9 40 23 67 3 .296 1.20 2.32 2.85 11.3 1.2
50o 2.5 2.2 21 46 0 48.7 39 22 63 3 .304 1.25 2.50 3.07 10.2 1.1
40o 2.4 2.2 21 46 0 45.6 38 21 59 3 .313 1.30 2.68 3.29 9.1 1.0
30o 2.4 2.2 21 46 0 42.4 37 21 54 3 .322 1.36 2.89 3.53 7.8 0.9
20o 2.4 2.3 21 46 0 38.7 35 20 50 3 .333 1.43 3.12 3.81 6.4 0.7
10o 2.3 2.4 21 46 0 33.7 33 19 43 3 .348 1.53 3.47 4.22 4.3 0.5
Weighted Mean2.52.22146048.23822623.3021.232.473.0410.41.1

Preseason Long-Term Forecast (Beyond the 2019 Projections)

Playing time estimates are based on performance, not Depth Charts.
Year Age W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR GB% BABIP WHIP ERA DRA H/9 BB/9 K/9 HR/9 WARP
202030422165069513291548.2951.212.983.116.74.211.90.71.5
202131311856059462978548.2981.263.263.417.04.411.80.81.1
202232311855058452777448.3031.243.083.227.04.211.90.61.2
202333311753056442673448.3051.263.123.267.14.211.80.61.1
202434311649052412467448.3031.263.203.357.14.211.70.71.0
202535311649052412467448.3021.263.173.317.14.211.70.71.0
202636211444046372160448.3041.253.203.357.24.111.70.80.9
202737211341044352058448.3041.253.193.337.24.111.90.80.9
202838211341044352057448.3041.263.223.377.24.111.70.80.8

Comparable Players (Similarity Index 75)

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend
1 85 Zach Putnam 2017 1.04
2 85 Nick Masset 2011 3.84
3 83 Brett Cecil 2016 4.17
4 82 Tom Wilhelmsen 2013 4.27
5 81 Chris Resop 2012 4.28
6 81 Michael Wuertz 2008 4.63
7 81 Adam Ottavino 2015 0.00
8 80 Justin Grimm 2018 10.38
9 79 Pedro Baez 2017 3.38
10 78 Xavier Cedeno 2016 3.70
11 78 Luis Garcia 2016 6.46
12 78 Joel Hanrahan 2011 2.23
13 78 Danny Farquhar 2016 3.82
14 78 Will Harris 2014 4.34
15 78 Juan Oviedo 2011 4.20
16 77 Cory Rasmus 2017 0.00 DNP
17 77 Liam Hendriks 2018 4.13
18 77 Juan Cruz 2008 2.96
19 77 Kevin Gregg 2007 3.64
20 77 Neftali Feliz 2017 6.46
21 77 Sammy Solis 2018 6.41
22 76 Rafael Perez 2011 3.86
23 76 Steve Cishek 2015 4.23
24 76 Aaron Heilman 2008 5.68
25 76 Boone Logan 2014 7.20
26 76 John Axford 2012 5.45
27 76 Charlie Furbush 2015 2.49
28 76 Fernando Salas 2014 3.38
29 75 David Carpenter 2015 4.74
30 75 Jake Diekman 2016 3.74
31 75 Derrick Turnbow 2007 4.76
32 75 Vinnie Chulk 2008 5.12
33 75 Brian Wilson 2011 3.27
34 75 Neal Cotts 2009 7.36
35 75 Jason Frasor 2007 4.58
36 74 Dan Jennings 2016 2.67
37 74 Jose Alvarez 2018 2.86
38 74 Luke Gregerson 2013 3.26
39 74 Vinnie Pestano 2014 3.86
40 74 Drew Pomeranz 2018 6.45
41 74 Josh Osich 2018 8.25
42 74 Shane Greene 2018 5.54
43 74 Fernando Rodney 2006 4.52
44 74 Heath Hembree 2018 4.50
45 74 Hong-Chih Kuo 2011 9.67
46 74 Greg Aquino 2007 5.79
47 74 C.J. Wilson 2010 3.66
48 74 Sean Marshall 2012 2.66
49 74 Jon Rauch 2008 4.52
50 74 Chad Qualls 2008 3.54
51 73 Aaron Loup 2017 4.21
52 73 Evan Meek 2012 6.75
53 73 Wesley Wright 2014 3.54
54 73 Gonzalez Germen 2017 0.00 DNP
55 73 Kevin Quackenbush 2018 11.00
56 73 Mike MacDougal 2006 1.55
57 73 Juan Gutierrez 2013 4.72
58 73 Heath Bell 2007 2.11
59 73 Carlos Carrasco 2016 3.94
60 73 Justin Wilson 2017 3.57
61 73 Matt Lindstrom 2009 6.65
62 73 Brandon Kintzler 2014 3.55
63 73 Taylor Buchholz 2011 3.46
64 73 Ryan Madson 2010 2.72
65 73 Brad Brach 2015 2.84
66 73 Jason Motte 2011 2.91
67 73 Brandon Workman 2018 3.27
68 73 Adam Warren 2017 2.98
69 72 Marc Rzepczynski 2015 7.46
70 72 John Grabow 2008 2.96
71 72 Neil Ramirez 2018 4.54
72 72 Matt Guerrier 2008 5.42
73 72 Jerry Blevins 2013 3.45
74 72 Dellin Betances 2017 3.02
75 72 Ryan O'Rourke 2017 0.00 DNP
76 72 Nate Karns 2017 4.17
77 72 Andrew Bailey 2013 3.77
78 72 Mike Dunn 2014 4.11
79 72 Justin De Fratus 2017 0.00 DNP
80 72 Bryan Morris 2016 3.57
81 72 J.P. Howell 2012 3.04
82 72 Brandon League 2012 3.38
83 71 Jeff Nelson 1996 4.60
84 71 Alex Colome 2018 3.44
85 71 Dan Wheeler 2007 5.79
86 71 Tyson Ross 2016 13.50
87 71 Santiago Casilla 2010 2.28
88 71 Rich Gossage 1981 1.16
89 71 Jose Veras 2010 3.75
90 71 Buddy Boshers 2017 5.14
91 71 Brandon Gomes 2014 3.71
92 71 Mitchell Boggs 2013 8.87
93 71 Drew Storen 2017 5.27
94 71 Jose Valverde 2007 2.94
95 71 Hector Neris 2018 5.10
96 71 Christian Friedrich 2017 0.00 DNP
97 71 Jim Johnson 2012 2.75
98 71 Oliver Drake 2016 5.50
99 71 Mark Davis 1990 5.64
100 71 Josh Outman 2014 3.18

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2019  Due to publishing agreements, the 2019 player comments and team essays are only available in the Baseball Prospectus 2019 book (available in hardcopy, and soon e-book and Kindle).
2018 The polite way to phrase the question is “How much does a former first-rounder need to produce to justify his draft slot?” If we’re among friends, the real question is “Has Barnes done enough to avoid being labeled a bust?” Barnes was the 19th overall pick back in 2011 and was projected to be a fast-moving mid-rotation starter, or at the very least a dominant reliever. Instead he’s just slightly better than your run-of-the-mill, medium-leverage bullpen guy. He’s got a big fastball that features little movement. He’s got a good curveball that he can’t always throw for strikes. He was solid enough early in the season to serve as the primary setup man and bad enough in September to get left off the postseason roster. If Barnes hadn’t been a first-round pick, you wouldn’t know him apart from 60 other guys in the majors with his profile. This might seem harsh since Barnes just had his best season by WARP. It’s just that Barnes’ best isn’t special.
2017 Barnes has three things going for him: size, velocity and pedigree. The big right-hander routinely reaches 97 with his fastball, and while his curveball is inconsistent it flashes plus often enough for you to understand why the Red Sox popped him 19th overall back in 2011. Barnes also has three things working against him: the lack of a third pitch, spotty command and a heater that’s more about speed than movement. Seriously, Barnes’ fastball is so straight it could hold a Senate seat in North Carolina. Add it all together and you have a middle reliever who’s sometimes dominant and sometimes dominated, making Barnes more likely to stay a seventh-inning guy than ascend to something greater.
2016 It's getting harder and harder to be optimistic about Barnes' future as an impact major leaguer. He throws hard and has pitched well in the upper minors in the past, but the UConn product is inconsistent, hasn't mastered a third pitch and frequently loses his command. It's long been assumed that Barnes could be a dominant late-inning weapon as a reliever, but the right-hander was shellacked to the tune of a .304/.362/.511 line in 32 innings out of the 'pen in the majors. Barnes is just 25, has an ideal build and throws hard, so he's far from out of chances. But if he hadn't been a first-round pick there wouldn't be much differentiating him from the myriad dime-a-dozen flamethrowers who can't hit their spots and wash out in Triple-A.
2015 Barnes has all the tools he needs to succeed as a major-league starter. His fastball grades out as plus or plus-plus, his curveball is a strong second weapon and his changeup also flashes above-average potential. Yet he hasn't put together a good season from start-to-finish since he graduated to the mid-minors. He missed some time with a shoulder injury to begin the 2014 season and got off to an abysmal start in Pawtucket. He eventually showed improvement over his final 10 starts, but there's still plenty of Barnes raising* to be done before he can be relied upon as a starter at the highest level. The UConn product got a cup of coffee as a reliever in Boston at the end of the year, and while he'd likely be dominant in that role the Red Sox have to hope he figures it out in the rotation. *So sorry
2014 Barnes' 2013 season looks like a failure next to his more attractive past, but he progressed, and that's what matters. The 2011 first-rounder has a promising curveball and changeup, but disposed of low-minors opposition almost entirely with his plus fastball, as pitchers with plus heat in the lower levels tend to do. Double-A was the first challenge for his raw secondary offerings: He scuffled in the first half, but dominated from mid-July on, racking up a 2.30 ERA with 54 strikeouts against 20 walks in his final 43 innings. There's work to be done with his curve and change, and the walks need to come down, but the season ended on a high note with Barnes promoted to Triple-A to face competition that will force that education upon him. If he takes notes, there's a future in the middle of a big-league rotation for him.
2013 Boston hasnt produced a top starting pitcher since Clay Buchholz in 2007, so Barnes isnt just a sip of water in the desert, hes a mirage come to life. Bostons first-round pick in 2011, Barnes has an easy delivery that pumps the ball in the mid-90s with excellent sink in the lower half of the zone. He keeps hitters off-balance with a good breaking ball and an average changeup, both with above-average potential. After five starts with just one run allowed in the Sally League, Boston moved him up to High-A, where he continued to pitch well. If he can improve his fastball command, dont be surprised to see Barnes reach the upper minors before the year is out.
2012 Unlike Anthony Ranaudo, who didn't get his first taste of professional action until the season after he was drafted, Boston's first pick in the 2011 draft already has some innings under his belt thanks to the Fall Instructional League. Barnes's fastball sits 93-95, and as of now it is his strongest offering, especially when used in the lower portions of the strike zone. He needs to work on his change, but his curveball is the real deal. He will get the chance to refine his mechanics, change-up, and overall approach in his first taste of full-season ball in 2012.

BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Matt Barnes

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2016-01-27 19:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Matt. Long time listener (about a minute), first time caller. Please give me two relievers (one Sox, one not) who you think could break out this year.
(bgrosnick from Michigan)
For the Sox, I'll go with Matt Barnes. Focusing solely on being a reliever could do him wonders. Non-Sox I'll say Kyle Barraclough. (Matt Collins)
2014-09-15 19:30:00 (link to chat)Is Matt Barnes still a viable starter in the majors, or is he destined to be a AAAA/reliever?
(Colin from CT)
His last 10-or-so starts in Triple-A were really damn good, even though the first half of his season was uninspiring. I'd give him another year in the rotation and see if he can start finishing his CB more. If not, he has upside as an eighth inning guy. (Ben Carsley)
2014-06-05 14:00:00 (link to chat)Thanks for rocking the marathon chat today, Nick! Any thoughts on what's going on with Matt Barnes? Doesn't seem like the curveball is making steps and the knack for getting hit hard seems to have followed him from AA to AAA this season. Is it time to downgrade his ceiling a notch or two? He's starting to look like a #3, at best.
(jmoultz from Chicago)
Barnes has always been a #3 guy for me, but I honestly can't say I've seen him or talked to any one about him recently given my recent focus on the draft. Hit up Chris Mellen on Twitter -- should have money thoughts for you (@ChrisMellen). (Draft Day Chat with Nick J. Faleris)
2014-04-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)Is Matt Barnes a starter for the Red Sox in 2015? He seems to be close, one pitch shy of making an impact.
(John from CT)
I do think he'll be in the rotation next season. I still believe in him as a starter, particularly if he's competing with Allen Webster and Anthony Ranaudo for a slot. In the end, he's probably a mid-rotation guy that still carries significant value. (Mark Anderson)
2014-01-23 12:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Matt, Fangraphs did an article of building the perfect pitcher yesterday. Which minor league pitcher(s) come closest to being "perfect" based on the criteria?
(baseballjunkie from waiting for spring training)
I didn't see the article, and I can't comment on every pitcher in the minors, but basically I'd nominate Matt Barnes. He's 6'4, 200+ pounds with clean arm action and strong mechanics and an excellent fastball. How'd I do? (Matthew Kory)
2014-01-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Who has the best career of Matt Barnes, Allen Webster, and Henry Owens?
(Shawnykid23 from CT)
I'm still a believer that Barnes will figure it out and settle into the middle of a big league rotation. Owens likely ends up in that same realm and I think they look like similar MLB contributors. Webster probably settles in behind the two in terms of career production; mostly because there's a decent chance he ends up in the bullpen. (Mark Anderson)
2013-09-27 13:00:00 (link to chat)What does Matt Barnes need to improve upon to demonstrate 2/3 rotation status potential.
(dawson950 from Cape Cod)
Like a lot of young pitchers, Barnes need to gain some consistency with his mechanics to allow him to locate his fastball and curveball better than he does right now. The changeup needs to take some steps forward as well and I think it can become an average pitch in time. He's not arriving as quickly as I think many Red Sox fans would like, particularly after a dominating 2012 season, but he's still going to be a very good Major League starter. (Mark Anderson)
2013-07-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)Matt Barnes has pitched better as of late. Is he a future ace or #2 or #3?
(John from CT)
I don't much about him, but our prospect staff has him topping out as a 2. Which is a dang high ceiling. (Harry Pavlidis)
2013-04-04 11:00:00 (link to chat)Matt Barnes a potential #2?
(Kyle from Utah)
I can see the case for that, yes. (Jason Parks)
2013-03-21 13:00:00 (link to chat)Any prospects I should look out for this year in Portland?
(Morgan K. from Portland, ME)
I'll defer to the prospect team for deeper names, but Xander Bogaerts and Matt Barnes are in line to begin the year with the Sea Dogs, I believe. (Daniel Rathman)
2012-12-19 13:00:00 (link to chat)When people say Matt Barnes has the potential to be a number 2, what does that really mean? Who are some current major league pitchers that you consider to be number 2s?
(Tom from Mainer)
That you're looking at a pitcher that can be above-average to well above-average at the major league level. I always saw Jon Lester prior to his rough 2012 season as a number 2. Barnes may end up a notch below that, or a number 3, but he's got potential for some seasons on that level. (Chris Mellen)
2013-01-02 13:00:00 (link to chat)What is Matt Barnes ceiling? 1-2 Starter or more of a 3-4?
(Shawn from CT)
Split the difference -- #2 ceiling with a #3/#4 likely outcome? (Nick Faleris)
2012-10-18 13:00:00 (link to chat)With the possibility that Boston can coax Toronto to part with Farrell, is there any way that Boston can get him without parting with Matt Barnes, Xander Bogearts, Gavin Cecchini or Jackie Bradley Jr.?
(jlarsen from chicago)
Ben Cherington is a smart guy. I would be stunned if he parted with a top-five prospect type in order to acquire Farrell's services. (R.J. Anderson)
2012-09-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Professor. As a heavily invested red sox fan, my already strong interest in the farm system has grown as the parent club has faltered. Am I being overly negative to worry about Matt Barnes viability as more than a #4 major league starter? He dominated low A with a big fastball, but slowed at a more advanced level and it seems as though so much of his stock rests on the further development of secondaries that is far from guaranteed.
(John Wayne from Suburban Boston (by way of Canada))
I think a #4 starter would be a very acceptable outcome for Barnes, as it comes with great value to the team. A cost-controlled major league starter is a huge piece to have on a roster. I can' stress this enough. I know we all love stars, but they are rare creatures. Teams are built on cheap, controllable talent that can provide value at their position. Barnes has a higher ceiling than a #4 starter, but if that's the outcome, I'd smile and be satisfied at the future value he will provide. I know its not the answer most people want to read. I get it. But developing prospects into major leaguers is the goal. Developing stars is the dream. (Jason Parks)
2012-08-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)Taijuan Walker made your top 10 prospects in the minors list a few weeks ago, as did Dylan Bundy and Gerrit Cole. Where do hurlers Jose Fernandez, Archie Bradley, and Matt Barnes factor in to your pitching prospect rankings?
(Francois from Toronto)
I would have Fernandez, Bradley, and Barnes in my top 25. Those are legit arms. I really, really like them. Barnes is the big sleeper there, He doesn't have the same extreme ceiling, but he can bring it and he's going to sneak up on people and develop into a quality major league starter. (Jason Parks)
2012-05-21 14:00:00 (link to chat)At what point, if any, do we believe Matt Barnes' ceiling has changed?
(Mike from MA)
I don't think it's changed, but what has changed dramatically is his chances of REACHING that ceiling. That's the variable that changes FAR more often than the ceiling itself. We also need to get away from ceiling talk. So few players hit their ceiling. (Kevin Goldstein)


BP Roundtables

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PITCHf/x Pitcher Profile

A Collaboration between BrooksBaseball.net and Baseball Prospectus - Pitch classifications provided by Pitch Info LLC