Biographical

Portrait of Roger Clemens

Roger Clemens PRed Sox

Red Sox Player Cards | Red Sox Team Audit | Red Sox Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years G IP W L SV ERA WARP
25 709 4916.7 354 184 0 3.12 144.6
Birth Date8-4-1962
Height6' 4"
Weight205 lbs
Age55 years, 10 months, 18 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
1984 BOS MLB 21 20 133.3 9 4 0 146 29 126 13 .267 105 9.9 2.0 0.9 8.5 50% .329 .252 1.31 2.82 4.32 57 2.74 64.1 3.6
1985 BOS MLB 15 15 98.3 7 5 0 83 37 74 5 .265 103 7.6 3.4 0.5 6.8 48% .271 .221 1.22 3.11 3.29 89 3.81 87.4 1.7
1986 BOS MLB 33 33 254.0 24 4 0 179 67 238 21 .268 101 6.3 2.4 0.7 8.4 42% .237 .212 0.97 2.82 2.48 68 2.40 54.2 8.6
1987 BOS MLB 36 36 281.7 20 9 0 248 83 256 19 .266 103 7.9 2.7 0.6 8.2 47% .290 .224 1.18 2.90 2.97 65 3.00 63.1 8.6
1988 BOS MLB 35 35 264.0 18 12 0 217 62 291 17 .266 104 7.4 2.1 0.6 9.9 40% .291 .224 1.06 2.22 2.93 50 2.22 53.5 8.8
1989 BOS MLB 35 35 253.3 17 11 0 215 93 230 20 .266 107 7.6 3.3 0.7 8.2 48% .281 .237 1.22 3.25 3.13 76 2.70 65.0 7.1
1990 BOS MLB 31 31 228.3 21 6 0 193 54 209 7 .263 106 7.6 2.1 0.3 8.2 50% .289 .217 1.08 2.17 1.93 59 2.36 54.9 7.6
1991 BOS MLB 35 35 271.3 18 10 0 219 65 241 15 .266 106 7.3 2.2 0.5 8.0 47% .272 .216 1.05 2.62 2.62 62 2.26 52.2 9.6
1992 BOS MLB 32 32 246.7 18 11 0 203 62 208 11 .262 103 7.4 2.3 0.4 7.6 52% .275 .217 1.07 2.54 2.41 71 2.23 54.0 8.2
1993 BOS MLB 29 29 191.7 11 14 0 175 67 160 17 .261 104 8.2 3.1 0.8 7.5 48% .286 .237 1.26 3.69 4.46 88 3.23 69.6 5.1
1994 BOS MLB 24 24 170.7 9 7 0 124 71 168 15 .266 103 6.5 3.7 0.8 8.9 53% .252 .216 1.14 3.68 2.85 73 2.49 50.3 6.3
1995 BOS MLB 23 23 140.0 10 5 0 141 60 132 15 .264 103 9.1 3.9 1.0 8.5 46% .313 .255 1.44 4.23 4.18 91 4.53 92.8 2.0
1996 BOS MLB 34 34 242.7 10 13 0 216 106 257 19 .270 104 8.0 3.9 0.7 9.5 49% .305 .235 1.33 3.50 3.63 68 2.90 57.2 8.3
1997 TOR MLB 34 34 264.0 21 7 0 204 68 292 9 .267 95 7.0 2.3 0.3 10.0 53% .294 .200 1.03 2.28 2.05 59 2.71 56.5 9.1
1998 TOR MLB 33 33 234.7 20 6 0 169 88 271 11 .267 92 6.5 3.4 0.4 10.4 54% .271 .216 1.10 2.73 2.65 66 2.56 53.0 8.5
1999 NYA MLB 30 30 187.7 14 10 0 185 90 163 20 .267 96 8.9 4.3 1.0 7.8 48% .306 .258 1.47 4.42 4.60 94 4.78 93.0 3.0
2000 NYA MLB 32 32 204.3 13 8 0 184 84 188 26 .265 91 8.1 3.7 1.1 8.3 48% .277 .244 1.31 4.41 3.70 82 3.60 69.3 5.8
2001 NYA MLB 33 33 220.3 20 3 0 205 72 213 19 .259 96 8.4 2.9 0.8 8.7 53% .305 .236 1.26 3.33 3.51 78 3.29 68.3 6.1
2002 NYA MLB 29 29 180.0 13 6 0 172 63 192 18 .258 96 8.6 3.1 0.9 9.6 54% .316 .253 1.31 3.39 4.35 75 3.01 64.5 5.2
2003 NYA MLB 33 33 211.7 17 9 0 199 58 190 24 .263 98 8.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 45% .291 .246 1.21 3.66 3.91 79 3.55 74.3 5.1
2004 HOU MLB 33 33 214.3 18 4 0 169 79 218 15 .259 95 7.1 3.3 0.6 9.2 51% .275 .217 1.16 3.01 2.98 81 3.13 64.7 6.2
2005 HOU MLB 32 32 211.3 13 8 0 151 62 185 11 .255 98 6.4 2.6 0.5 7.9 51% .243 .198 1.01 2.83 1.87 85 3.10 66.8 5.7
2006 HOU MLB 19 19 113.3 7 6 0 89 29 102 7 .256 95 7.1 2.3 0.6 8.1 50% .265 .206 1.04 2.98 2.30 90 3.96 80.7 2.3
2007 NYA MLB 18 17 99.0 6 6 0 99 31 68 9 .265 104 9.0 2.8 0.8 6.2 48% .293 .242 1.31 4.20 4.18 96 3.98 82.3 1.9
CareerMLB7097074916.73541840418515804672363.2641007.72.90.78.649%.284.2271.173.123.12732.9964.0144.6

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
1983 WHV A+ 4 4 29.0 3 1 0 22 0 36 0 .000 6.8 0.0 0.0 11.2 0% .000 .000 0.76 0.46 1.24 0 0.00 0.0
1983 NBR AA 7 7 52.0 4 1 0 31 12 59 1 .000 5.4 2.1 0.2 10.2 0% .000 .000 0.83 1.27 1.38 0 0.00 0.0
1984 BOS MLB 21 20 133.3 9 4 0 146 29 126 13 .267 105 9.9 2.0 0.9 8.5 50% .329 .252 1.31 2.82 4.32 57 2.74 64.1
1984 PAW AAA 7 6 46.7 2 3 0 39 14 50 3 .000 7.5 2.7 0.6 9.6 0% .000 .000 1.13 2.35 1.93 0 0.00 0.0
1985 BOS MLB 15 15 98.3 7 5 0 83 37 74 5 .265 103 7.6 3.4 0.5 6.8 48% .271 .221 1.22 3.11 3.29 89 3.81 87.4
1986 BOS MLB 33 33 254.0 24 4 0 179 67 238 21 .268 101 6.3 2.4 0.7 8.4 42% .237 .212 0.97 2.82 2.48 68 2.40 54.2
1987 BOS MLB 36 36 281.7 20 9 0 248 83 256 19 .266 103 7.9 2.7 0.6 8.2 47% .290 .224 1.18 2.90 2.97 65 3.00 63.1
1988 BOS MLB 35 35 264.0 18 12 0 217 62 291 17 .266 104 7.4 2.1 0.6 9.9 40% .291 .224 1.06 2.22 2.93 50 2.22 53.5
1989 BOS MLB 35 35 253.3 17 11 0 215 93 230 20 .266 107 7.6 3.3 0.7 8.2 48% .281 .237 1.22 3.25 3.13 76 2.70 65.0
1990 BOS MLB 31 31 228.3 21 6 0 193 54 209 7 .263 106 7.6 2.1 0.3 8.2 50% .289 .217 1.08 2.17 1.93 59 2.36 54.9
1991 BOS MLB 35 35 271.3 18 10 0 219 65 241 15 .266 106 7.3 2.2 0.5 8.0 47% .272 .216 1.05 2.62 2.62 62 2.26 52.2
1992 BOS MLB 32 32 246.7 18 11 0 203 62 208 11 .262 103 7.4 2.3 0.4 7.6 52% .275 .217 1.07 2.54 2.41 71 2.23 54.0
1993 BOS MLB 29 29 191.7 11 14 0 175 67 160 17 .261 104 8.2 3.1 0.8 7.5 48% .286 .237 1.26 3.69 4.46 88 3.23 69.6
1993 PAW AAA 1 1 3.7 0 0 0 1 4 8 0 .000 2.4 9.7 0.0 19.5 0% .000 .000 1.35 2.11 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
1994 BOS MLB 24 24 170.7 9 7 0 124 71 168 15 .266 103 6.5 3.7 0.8 8.9 53% .252 .216 1.14 3.68 2.85 73 2.49 50.3
1995 BOS MLB 23 23 140.0 10 5 0 141 60 132 15 .264 103 9.1 3.9 1.0 8.5 46% .313 .255 1.44 4.23 4.18 91 4.53 92.8
1995 SAR A+ 1 1 4.0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0 .000 0.0 4.5 0.0 15.8 0% .000 .000 0.50 1.11 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
1995 PAW AAA 1 1 5.0 0 0 0 1 3 5 0 .000 1.8 5.4 0.0 9.0 0% .000 .000 0.80 2.99 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
1996 BOS MLB 34 34 242.7 10 13 0 216 106 257 19 .270 104 8.0 3.9 0.7 9.5 49% .305 .235 1.33 3.50 3.63 68 2.90 57.2
1997 TOR MLB 34 34 264.0 21 7 0 204 68 292 9 .267 95 7.0 2.3 0.3 10.0 53% .294 .200 1.03 2.28 2.05 59 2.71 56.5
1998 TOR MLB 33 33 234.7 20 6 0 169 88 271 11 .267 92 6.5 3.4 0.4 10.4 54% .271 .216 1.10 2.73 2.65 66 2.56 53.0
1999 NYA MLB 30 30 187.7 14 10 0 185 90 163 20 .267 96 8.9 4.3 1.0 7.8 48% .306 .258 1.47 4.42 4.60 94 4.78 93.0
2000 NYA MLB 32 32 204.3 13 8 0 184 84 188 26 .265 91 8.1 3.7 1.1 8.3 48% .277 .244 1.31 4.41 3.70 82 3.60 69.3
2001 NYA MLB 33 33 220.3 20 3 0 205 72 213 19 .259 96 8.4 2.9 0.8 8.7 53% .305 .236 1.26 3.33 3.51 78 3.29 68.3
2002 NYA MLB 29 29 180.0 13 6 0 172 63 192 18 .258 96 8.6 3.1 0.9 9.6 54% .316 .253 1.31 3.39 4.35 75 3.01 64.5
2002 TAM A+ 1 1 5.0 1 0 0 5 2 6 1 .000 9.0 3.6 1.8 10.8 0% .333 .000 1.40 4.57 5.40 0 0.00 0.0
2002 NRW AA 1 1 7.0 0 1 0 5 0 7 0 .000 6.4 0.0 0.0 9.0 0% .263 .000 0.71 1.18 1.29 0 0.00 0.0
2003 NYA MLB 33 33 211.7 17 9 0 199 58 190 24 .263 98 8.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 45% .291 .246 1.21 3.66 3.91 79 3.55 74.3
2004 HOU MLB 33 33 214.3 18 4 0 169 79 218 15 .259 95 7.1 3.3 0.6 9.2 51% .275 .217 1.16 3.01 2.98 81 3.13 64.7
2005 HOU MLB 32 32 211.3 13 8 0 151 62 185 11 .255 98 6.4 2.6 0.5 7.9 51% .243 .198 1.01 2.83 1.87 85 3.10 66.8
2006 HOU MLB 19 19 113.3 7 6 0 89 29 102 7 .256 95 7.1 2.3 0.6 8.1 50% .265 .206 1.04 2.98 2.30 90 3.96 80.7
2006 LEX A 1 1 3.1 0 0 0 3 0 6 1 .250 91 8.7 0.0 2.9 17.4 33% .400 .280 0.97 4.59 2.90 0 0.00 0.0
2006 CCH AA 1 1 6.1 1 0 0 2 0 11 0 .000 3.0 0.0 0.0 16.2 0% .250 .000 0.33 -0.34 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
2006 ROU AAA 1 1 5.1 1 0 0 5 3 5 0 .268 87 8.8 5.3 0.0 8.8 53% .294 .221 1.57 3.14 5.29 94 0.00 0.0
2006 USA wor 2 2 8.0 1 1 0 7 0 10 0 .000 7.9 0.0 0.0 11.2 0% .318 .000 0.88 1.63 2.25 0 0.00 0.0
2007 NYA MLB 18 17 99.0 6 6 0 99 31 68 9 .265 104 9.0 2.8 0.8 6.2 48% .293 .242 1.31 4.20 4.18 96 3.98 82.3
2007 TAM A+ 1 1 4.0 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 .243 101 6.8 0.0 2.2 4.5 54% .167 .210 0.75 5.55 2.25 98 4.00 99.2
2007 TRN AA 1 1 5.3 0 0 0 6 4 5 0 .250 81 10.2 6.8 0.0 8.5 35% .353 .349 1.89 4.20 5.09 106 6.04 109.3
2007 SWB AAA 1 1 6.0 1 0 0 2 2 6 0 .262 91 3.0 3.0 0.0 9.0 43% .143 .108 0.67 2.17 0.00 95 3.63 95.6

Plate Discipline

YEAR PITCHES ZONE_RT SWING_RT CONTACT_RT Z_SWING_RT O_SWING_RT Z_CONTACT_RT O_CONTACT_RT SW_STRK_RT

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2007-09-17 2007-10-03 DTD 16 13 - Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2007-09-04 2007-09-16 DTD 12 10 Right Elbow Sprain Ulnar Collateral Ligament - -
2006-09-05 2006-09-15 DTD 10 7 Right Groin Strain - -
2005-10-23 2005-10-27 DTD 4 0 Left Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2005-09-20 2005-10-01 DTD 11 10 Left Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2005-09-04 2005-09-09 DTD 5 4 Left Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2005-08-13 2005-08-13 DTD 0 0 - Low Back Soreness -
2005-08-07 2005-08-07 DTD 0 0 - Low Back Soreness -
2005-07-28 2005-08-02 DTD 5 4 - Low Back Spasms - -
2005-05-31 2005-06-05 DTD 5 4 Right Groin Strain - -
2005-04-18 2005-04-18 DTD 0 0 Right Wrist Contusion Batted Ball - -
2005-04-02 2005-04-02 Camp 0 0 Left Wrist Contusion Batted Ball - -
2005-03-20 2005-03-29 Camp 9 0 Right Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2004-08-19 2004-08-23 DTD 4 4 Right Thigh Strain Calf - -
2004-07-06 2004-07-10 DTD 4 4 Right Knee Soreness - -
2004-05-23 2004-05-28 DTD 5 4 - Ankle Contusion - -
2003-06-13 2003-06-13 DTD 0 0 - General Medical Illness Upper Respiratory Infection - -
2003-05-22 2003-05-26 DTD 4 4 Right Hand Contusion Batted Ball - -
2002-09-21 2002-09-25 DTD 4 4 Left Lower Leg Contusion Shin By Batted Ball - -
2002-07-13 2002-08-07 15-DL 25 22 Right Groin Stiffness -
2002-07-03 2002-07-12 DTD 9 6 Right Lower Leg Cramp - -
2002-06-21 2002-06-26 DTD 5 4 Right Forearm Contusion Batted Ball - -
2002-06-15 2002-06-15 DTD 0 0 Right Foot Contusion - -
2002-04-02 2002-04-07 DTD 5 4 Right Hand Contusion Batted Ball - -
2002-03-12 2002-03-17 Camp 5 0 Right Foot Contusion Batted Ball - -
2001-10-11 2001-10-15 DTD 4 0 - Thigh Soreness Hamstring - -
2001-07-29 2001-08-04 DTD 6 5 Right Groin Strain - -
2001-06-03 2001-06-07 DTD 4 4 - Thigh Soreness Hamstring - -
2001-04-03 2001-04-08 DTD 5 4 Right Wrist Soreness - -
2000-09-24 2000-09-28 DTD 4 4 Right Thigh Contusion Hamstring Batted Ball - -
2000-07-25 2000-07-29 DTD 4 4 Left Thigh Cramp Quadriceps - -
2000-06-15 2000-07-02 15-DL 17 16 Right Groin Strain - -
2000-04-24 2000-04-24 DTD 0 0 - Low Back Soreness - -
1999-04-28 1999-05-22 15-DL 24 21 Left Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
1998-09-16 1998-09-16 DTD 0 0 Right Hand Contusion Batted Ball - -
1998-05-07 1998-05-07 DTD 0 0 Right Foot Contusion Batted Ball - -
1998-04-08 1998-04-17 DTD 9 8 - Groin Strain - -
1997-04-10 1997-04-19 DTD 9 7 - Groin Strain - -
1995-04-26 1995-06-02 15-DL 37 31 Right Shoulder Strain - -
1993-06-19 1993-07-16 15-DL 27 22 Right Groin Strain - -
1985-08-12 1985-10-07 56 53 Right Shoulder Surgery Small Labrum Tear 1985-08-30 -
1985-07-03 1985-08-03 15-DL 31 28 Right Shoulder Cartilage Injury Small Labrum Tear - -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2005 HOU $18,000,000
2004 HOU $5,000,000
2003 NYA $10,100,000
2002 NYA $10,300,000
2001 NYA $10,300,000
2000 NYA $6,350,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
6 yrPrevious$60,050,000
6 yrTotal$60,050,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
23 y 14 dHendricks Sports Mgmt

Details
  • 1 year/$28,000,022 (2007). Signed by NY Yankees as a free agent 5/6/07 (minor-league contract). To receive pro-rated portion of major-league salary after joining Yankees 6/9/07 (about $17.4M). Contract purchased 6/9/07.
  • 1 year/$22,000,022 (2006). Re-signed as free agent 5/06 (1 year/$0.322M minor-league deal). Contract purchased by Houston 6/06. Received pro-rated portion of major-league salary ($12,262,294) after re-joining Astros 6/22/06.
  • 1 year/$18M (2005). Re-signed by Houston 1/05 (avoided arbitration, $22M-$13.5M). Complete no-trade clause. $3M assignment bonus if Clemens waives no-trade clause.
  • 1 year/$5M (2004). Signed by Houston as a free agent 1/04 (out of retirement). $3.5M of 2004 salary deferred for 2 years. Bonuses: ($25,000 All Star, $1.4M attendance). 10-year personal-services contract with Houston after retirement.
  • 1 year/$10.1M (2003) (NY Yankees) (all deferred to 2004-2014). $8.1M present value at signing - paid as follows: 04:$0.6M, 05:$0.7M, 06:$0.9M, 07-12:$0.95M/year, 13-14:$1.1M/year. "Declined" 2003 player option, receiving $10.3M buyout.
  • 2 years/$30.9M (2001-02), plus 2003 option. Signed extension with NY Yankees 8/00. $5M bonus (paid 2001-02). 01:$7.8M, 02:$7.8M, 03:$10.3M player option ($10.3M buyout), 04:$7.2M club option.
  • 3 years/$24.75M (1997-99), plus $8.1M 2000 club option. Signed by Toronto as a free agent. $2M signing bonus. 97:$5.5M, 98:$7.5M, 99:$8M, 00:$8.1M option ($1.75M buyout). Acquired by NY Yankees in trade (from Toronto) 2/99. Side agreement (later invalidated by MLB) gave Clemens: a) right to request a trade, b) right to approve team to which he is traded, c) right to request trade to Houston after any season during the life of the contract.
  • 4 years/$21.521M (1992-95), plus 1996 option Signed extension with Boston 2/91. $0.621M signing bonus. 92:$4.4M, 93:$4.5M, 94:$5M, 95:$5.5M. 1996 option ($1.5M buyout): $5.5M club option if exercised before '93 season. $5.8M club option if exercised before '94 season. $6M player option with 220 IP in '94 or '95, OR 1st, 2nd or 3rd in '94 or '95 Cy Young vote. First player to receive $5M/year. Boston exercised $5.5M 1996 club option 3/93.
  • 3 years/$7.5M (1989-1991). Re-signed by Boston 2/89 (avoided arbitration, $2.36M-$1.9M). $0.3M signing bonus. 89:$2.2M, 90:$2.5M, 91:$2.5M. Award bonuses: $0.1M each for Cy Young, MVP & WS MVP. $50,000 for LCS MVP.
  • 2 years/$2M (1987-88), plus bonuses. 87:$0.65M, 88:$1.35M. Signed 4/87, replacing 1 year/$0.4M contract for 1987 (Boston had unilaterally renewed Clemens' contract when he walked out of training camp).
  • 1 year/$0.22M (1986), plus $0.12M in bonuses.
  • 1 year/$0.14M (1985).
  • Drafted by Boston 1983 (1-19). $121,000 signing bonus. Drafted by NY Mets 1981 (12-288) (did not sign).

BP Annual Player Comments

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BP Articles

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BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2016-03-28 13:00:00 (link to chat)As a scout what are the top 5 things that you look for?
(Matt from Albuquerque)
This is a great question, though it has a lot of nuance to it. It's probably best for a podcast.

However, I didn't want to let it go. Let's simplify it: 'what are you looking for in a PITCHING prospect.'

I'm always hoping that a prospect can be a starting pitcher. The types of relievers that I'll look at currently at the amateur level are almost always from the college ranks. It's bad business to pick high school relievers. So let's presume we're looking for a starting pitcher. In order for that to happen, I will look first at:

1. Body Type--does this guy have the durability to maintain his stuff and delivery every fifth day? Throughout a season? Throughout an outing?

2. Delivery--Does the delivery add or subtract from the aforementioned durability? Is it low-effort? Does it have injury red flags? Does it allow control and command--especially with non-fastballs?

3. Ability to throw secondary pitches for strikes--This is CRITICAL for me to really like a guy as a starter. At the MLB level, you have to (have to have to have to) be able to alter your sequences to big league hitters the second and third times through a lineup. Regardless of how hard you throw, one of the first scouts who really took me under their wing when I was 19 once told me: 'Big league hitters could time a bullet if they saw a gun shot over the heart of the plate enough times.' That stuck with me. You can't just be a fastball guy and expect to have top-rotation success at the big league level, ESPECIALLY as a right-handed starter.

4. Velocity--It isn't that it's not important, but I do think it's LESS important than feel to pitch, change speeds, and move different pitches around the zone. I will say that this order (control of secondaries ahead of velocity) is more for a STARTING pitcher than a reliever. If you're a reliever, part of the reason why is you don't have to face hitters more than once. As such, you CAN go at them aggressively with raw arm-strength. Not so much so if you're a starter and you want to make it past the 6th every fifth day.

5. Competitive fire--Yeah, this is a little 'scouty' of me. I know. I know. However, I'm a DC native and I've seen Stephen Strasburg for years. I think Stephen Strasburg is more TALENTED than almost any pitcher in baseball. However, you know why I think he's more of a first-division #2 starter than at true #1 ace on any team? That fire isn't there. There is VERY limited difference in terms of stuff and execution between a #1 and a #2 these days. Both of those ceilings immediately make you a tippy-top prospect everywhere you go. However, I really think the difference, therefore, lies much more in the ability to really go out there to BEAT the other club singlehandedly. Roger Clemens, Pedro Martinez, Randy Johnson, Bob Gibson--these guys went out there to beat your ass like it was a 0-0 ballgame, regardless of score. A true #1 starter has an attribute that can't be quantified. (Adam McInturff)
2014-05-02 14:00:00 (link to chat)Alex Meyer is crediting a new changeup grip that he's added since Opening Day with the recent improvement in his fortunes. (In his last two starts he's got 22K in 12.1 IP and he's throwing the change quite a bit.) How often is a simple alteration that effective this suddenly?
(Cris E from St Paul, MN)
Major changes to stuff can make a huge difference in short order, especially when it comes to off-speed stuff. Meyer has an 8 fastball, a plus slider, and unfair biological advantages - tack on a change-up that batters struggle to identify from his deep release point and you have the recipe for a high-impact pitcher.

Elite pitchers do this at the big-league level, as well, especially to compensate for deteriorating velocity.

Roger Clemens went from a FB-CB guy in his 20's to a FB-Split guy in his late 30's and 40's, King Felix has developed the CH to be his most lethal weapon, etc. For Meyer, the change greatly elevates his already vaulted ceiling as a prospect.

On the jukebox: Van Halen, "You Really Got Me" (Doug Thorburn)
2014-02-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)How much of pitching is genetics vs hard work and good training? If the top pitching coaches from around the league coached a bunch of determined but otherwise very average joes, how many of them would make the majors?
(Rags from Brooklyn)
Genetics certainly matter, but to be elite requires tons of hard work and appropriate training. The best pitchers of all time were obsessive about improvement through hard work and proper training, from Nolan Ryan to Roger Clemens and Randy Johnson.

The second question is impossible to answer without context. (Doug Thorburn)
2013-10-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)What would an 8 eephus pitch look like? More seriously, does it make sense for OFP to be an average of the pitch grades when some pitches will be much more important to a pitcher's success than others?
(justarobert from Santa Clara)
You bring up an excellent point, justarobert. I believe that OFP goes much deeper than an average of the pitch grades, and the way that the elements of a pitcher's repertoire complements the rest of the arsenal is a critical consideration. It is also essential to consider that a pitcher's stuff changes over time, both in terms of quality and variation, yet it is very difficult to capture this when doing an OFP grade. Roger Clemens is a great example - he was a fastball-curveball guy who threw over the top in his 20's, but he morphed into a FB-splitter guy with excellent balance and posture later in his career. Both the curve and the splitter deserved plus-plus grades, and the fastball was always elite, but few would have predicted that he would make such a major alteration to his pitch selection.

On the jukebox: Lagwagon, "Dis' Chords" (Doug Thorburn)
2012-11-29 13:00:00 (link to chat)Thanks for the chat, Dan! Mark Buehrle's comments have cast a light on the practice of unwritten agreements between players and teams. My sense is that, unlike in Buehrle's case, these are fairly common and generally are followed by both sides (Roger Clemens' handshake extension with the Yankees comes to mind). Is that right and, if so, can you comment on what you would view as legitimate (and illegitimate) reasons for making such agreements?
(edwardarthur from Champaign-Urbana, Illinois)
Edwardarthur, good question. First off, I have Known Mark since he was drafted by the White Sox, as we were both in that organization together at the time. He is an absolute winner, one of the best teammates I have ever been around. When negotiating a contract, a lot of stuff is said, all of it on the record between the two parties. There are contract clauses that can be included if you feel strongly about an item. Every club has its own concepts about they will and will. It do, but every player can also talk to every team. Ultimately, everybody has to decide what is the best overall deal. I was taught that anything you say you'll do, you better be really sure that you back it up. Tough situation for both sides there. (Dan Evans)
2012-11-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Ben, I'm not sure if you noticed but the Hall of Fame ballot this year includes names such as Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, Roger Clemens, and Mark McGwire. We hear a lot about should they be in the hall of fame or not, what do you think the writers will do?
(Steve G. from Athens, OH)
They're going to vote Bonds and Clemens in eventually, I think--it's much harder to justify an argument that they wouldn't have been Hall of Famers without steroids than it is for Sosa and McGwire, and the Hall is going to have to have the best players ever in it if it wants people to pay to get in. But as that guy in Gladiator says, "Not yet...not yet." (Ben Lindbergh)
2012-08-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)Your thoughts on the Roger Clemens, uh, return...story...stunt...fiasco...thing?
(Ashitaka1110 from Houston, TX)
Again, I wrote about Clemens today at BP.com. It was at the top of the page, with Clemens' picture setting up the story. I'm starting to get concerned about the people in this chat. (Jason Parks)
2012-06-29 13:00:00 (link to chat)Who are the best pitcher and non-pitcher not currently in the Hall of Fame? And if you could kick out one player, who would it be?
(oira79 from san francisco)
As of the 2013 ballot, which will be released this fall, the answers are America's most wanted couple, Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds. They'll retain those titles until the voters hold their noses and put them in the Hall, which I don't think will happen this year but will happen within three or four years. (Jay Jaffe)
2012-04-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)Good chat. Over the last 15 - 20 years, who are some of your favorite players to go to the ballpark and see play and why?
(Jerome from T Hills)
Some of them are obvious - warts and all, I'm thrilled that I've gotten to see Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez as often as I have over the years - both have provided some incredible moments. Mariano Rivera, of course. I'm lucky to have seen Tim Raines and Rickey Henderson relatively late in their careers. Ken Griffey Jr., Edgar Martinez, Jay Buhner and Randy Johnson were pretty special because the Mariners were a favorite before I came to New York, and a common point of reference for me and my brother. Manny Ramirez, when he was still an Indian, was a lot of fun. Jim Thome was a beast who seemed to homer every time he came to town.

Going further back, I'm thrilled I got to see Fernando Valenzuela pitch in person, even if it was only spring training. Likewise for seeing Reggie Jackson in spring training - both were huge parts of my childhood and adolesence. My first regular season major league game was Roger Clemens vs. Nolan Ryan in 1989 (read about it in today's column). That was incredibly special in retrospect because Ryan always meant a great deal to me.

I'm sure I've forgotten somebody, but that's a good start. (Jay Jaffe)
2012-04-04 13:00:00 (link to chat)So how do you feel about Roger Clemens claiming to be a Texan, yet he was born in Ohio??? Or better yet, St. Louis claims David Freese as a native son, yet he's from Texas...
(Quentin from Chicago)
Clemens has put in the wrench work necessary to earn my respect on the Texas front. That said, he wasn't born on Texas soil, so I have to judge him accordingly. (Jason Parks)
2011-04-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Rank these players in their feasibility to enter the MLB Hall of Fame someday: 1. Shoeless Joe Jackson 2. Pete Rose 3. Mark McGwire 4. Barry Bonds 5. Roger Clemens 6. Sammy Sosa 7. Alex Rodriguez
(UCBravesKing from Covington, KY)
I think A-Rod before any of the rest, because his usage will be seen as a dalliance and the bulk of his career is so impressive. The same, to a lesser extent, can be said of Clemens and Bonds, but the weight of his usage is so much heavier with the ongoing lawsuits, the Congressional testimony, etc. ALL the steroids candidates will benefit from some moment TBD when we have a better understanding of the impact of steroids on production, because just about everything you see is supposition. (Steven Goldman)
2010-07-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Jay, any thoughts on the wisdom/benefit of firing a hitting coach, specifically Milt Thompson? I know the bats have been off pace this year in Philly, but the offense had a nice track record prior to this year.
(bflaff1 from Phila., PA)
As Matt Swartz said on Twitter last night, it's very difficult for an outsider to have any feel for whether such a move is merited. Not only is it difficult to isolate performance but it's also impossible to quantify the interpersonal issues that come into play.

I beat the drum for the firing of Yankee pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre for years, but when I actually examined the numbers, found that the entirety of the underperformances on his watch boiled down to the late-period declines of Roger Clemens and Randy Johnson (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=4552).

The bottom line is that most of the time such firings boil down to interpersonal relationships or the need to satisfy bloodlust via the ritual sacrifice of the coach overseeing the underperforming unit - pitching coach, hitting coach, third base coach, offensive coordinator, defensive coordinator - it crosses sports. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-09-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Thank you for the chat. Do you think Erik Bedard will make a close to full recovery and be effective for a few more years? Any other pitchers who have made it back from a torn labrum in their pitching shoulder?
(Sumi from Monterey Park)
Very few and most are extreme examples like Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling. I don't have a lot of hope for a Bedard return, but if I was his agent, I'd get him to Dave Duncan no matter what. (Will Carroll)
2009-08-19 14:00:00 (link to chat)Good afternoon Jay ... thanks for the chat. Has the cloud of PEDs tarnished or thrown into the question the relevance of election to the HOF? (and yes, I know the exclusion of African-Americans prior to 1947 tarnished the HOF already) Jeter is a HOFer, yes? A-Rod, in the wake of his "confession"? Damon?
(dianagramr from Cubehenge)
Hi Diana. I think the question of PEDs and the Hall of Fame is an open one that will take at least a decade to tell us anything even remotely conclusive. As hard as it may be to envision the players outed as steroid users via one means or another actually getting in, I have a much harder time envisioning the Hall's relevance without guys like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Alex Rodriguez and Manny Ramirez.

As for Jeter, he's a lock; this year puts him over the line as far as JAWS is concerned, and he's got the kind of resume writers will love. Damon's going to have to get somewhere on his push for 3,000 hits to have much traction; he's got just two All-Star appearances and scores well below average on the Hall of Fame Monitor and HOF Standards metrics. A-Rod will get there eventually, I think, particularly if he keeps to this new STFU PR strategy. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-06-24 13:00:00 (link to chat)So after the hubbub about bringing David Price up too late, does it look like perhaps the Rays brought him up a bit too soon?
(Tim from Tampa)
No, not really. I think we've forgotten that there can be a transitional period for minors players coming to the majors, regardless of how impressive they are. You wouldn't have forecast Roger Clemens for 19 Cy Youngs off of 1984, Carl Hubbell was bounced out of Detroit before clicking with the Giants, the Braves sent Warren Spahn back to the minors after his first audition, and Jim Palmer didn't post an above-average ERA+ until year three. Price's minors numbers are what they are. Now he just has to evolve one more time. It should happen, but perhaps not instantly. This same impatience is something I see daily with the Yankees and Joba, Hughes, et al. (Steven Goldman)
2008-07-21 15:00:00 (link to chat)Will, I missed participating in your last chat, but I had a Tim Lincecum comment (pitching mechanics-related, not that other stuff). You had mentioned his back arch--I never noticed it, but could it be used to generate more velocity? To draw a cross-sport analogy, most top tennis players use a good deal of back arch to help generate velocity on their serves (McEnroe was an extreme example of this). Could pitchers make use of similar biomechanics?
(Dr. Wayne Pitcher from Castro Valley, CA)
They could and you're right, there are parallels between the tennis serve and the pitching motion. I tried a couple years ago to get Andy Roddick to throw a baseball, but his agent threatened my life. I'd bet he could get in the 90s. Heck, maybe IMG should take a couple of the second tier players at Bollietieri and move them over to the Baseball Academy! On Lincecum, yeah, maybe, but I don't see the same 'whip', the kind Roger Clemens had, tho it was less apparent because of their physiques. You'd really have to see him in mo-cap to really know. (Will Carroll)
2008-05-22 13:00:00 (link to chat)Sorry about that - I meant with "tweaks" i.e. a new pitch, different delivery, etc. I'd figure that a 27 year old like Rasner would have tried most things by now and will have limited success as a results of just throwing a cutter.
(Tony from Brooklyn, NY)
I don't have any data, but at least in the short term it can work. I guess Roger Clemens picking up the splitter has to be the best example. (Will Carroll)
2008-03-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)I think it's unfair to label Randy Johnson a "freak show". Roger Clemens had a freakishly powerful and durable arm; Greg Maddux had a freakish ability to locate a pitch. To be that good one has to have some "freak" in their DNA.
(havybeaks from Michigan)
That wasn't meant to be derogatory at all. Most major leaguers are freak shows in that their skill sets are so incredibly rare that the average major leaguer is worth a couple million dollars a year, and the best of them are worth upwards of $20 million at their peak.

At those prices, i wish I could get my freak on.

Ok folks, I'm going to take one more question.... (Jay Jaffe)
2008-02-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)There was just a report that the Clemens case could last several years. I hate Clemens... well I dislike him, I think he's pompous and guilty and would like to never see him pitch again, but there's no way his case is worth the time. I don't think he even deserves a jail sentence, though it would make me chuckle. I'm sure there's something these guys could be doing that's more worthwhile. If I could fire the government, I would.
(Dusty from Not Chicago!!!)
Have you ever met Roger Clemens? Remember the filter--on and off of the field--that you're seeing most of his actions through, and remember that journalism is perhaps a fundamentally broken medium when it comes to objectivity.

Me, I think it's a lot of wheel-spinning, but I don't think there's any dudgeon to embark upon, high or low. We don't know if it helped his performance on the field, we don't know the guy, and we don't know the truth. I honestly don't know why people get worked up about this stuff; the "what about the children?" narrative is a crock until, as several of my colleagues have noted, Congress and perhaps MLB spend some better-spent time on other dangerous substances. (Christina Kahrl)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2010-10-06 10:00:002010 Playoffs Day One"Paul (Drexel Hill): Gentlemen, prepare to watch the best pitcher of our generation work his magic. Sit back and enjoy."

Honest question, but how do we quantify our generation? Does this current generation include Greg Maddux, Pedro Martinez, and Roger Clemens?

Halladay is a good one, but he's definitely in their rear-view mirrors. (Brandon Warne)
2010-10-06 10:00:002010 Playoffs Day One"Paul (Drexel Hill): Gentlemen, prepare to watch the best pitcher of our generation work his magic. Sit back and enjoy."

Honest question, but how do we quantify our generation? Does this current generation include Greg Maddux, Pedro Martinez, and Roger Clemens?

Halladay is a good one, but he's definitely in their rear-view mirrors. (Brandon Warne)
2010-04-05 09:30:00Season Opener Roundtableredsoxin2004 (Columbia, CT): Twenty years from now I'm going to tell my son (currently 2) that I was lucky to see Pujols play. Not really a question just a commentary how scary good he is.

And I'm going to tell my son that I saw Bobby Meacham.

Also, that no matter how many people tell him he was named after Roger Clemens, I had bigger game in mind. (Steven Goldman)
2009-10-16 13:00:00NLCS Game Two/ALCS Game OneA year out of date, but compare the peak scores of these then-active pitchers:

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=7451

Roger Clemens: 83.9
Greg Maddux 86/0
Randy Johnson 77.3
Pedro Martinez 68.8
Curt Schilling 65.9
Mike Mussina 64.3
Tom Glavine 63.7
John Smoltz 58.5
Avg HoF SP 67.2
(Jay Jaffe)
2009-10-16 13:00:00NLCS Game Two/ALCS Game OneAnd Pedro holds two of the top three VORP years since 1954. Only Roger Clemens intrudes in his dominance. (Steph Bee)
 

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