Biographical

Portrait of Chone Figgins

Chone Figgins PHAngels

Angels Player Cards | Angels Team Audit | Angels Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years PA AVG OBP SLG DRC+ WARP
16 5360 .276 .349 .363 91 19.5
Birth Date1-22-1978
Height5' 8"
Weight180 lbs
Age40 years, 10 months, 20 days
BatsB
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

YEAR TEAM AGE G PA H 2B 3B HR BB SO HBP SB CS AVG OBP SLG DRC+ DRAA BRR FRAA BWARP
2002 ANA 24 15 12 2 1 0 0 0 5 0 2 1 .167 .167 .250 59 -0.6 0.9 0.0 0.1
2003 ANA 25 71 270 71 9 4 0 20 38 0 13 7 .296 .345 .367 71 -8.6 2.5 -3.2 -0.1
2004 ANA 26 148 638 171 22 17 5 49 94 0 34 13 .296 .350 .419 97 1.9 1.8 -0.8 2.4
2005 ANA 27 158 720 186 25 10 8 64 101 0 62 17 .290 .352 .397 96 0.9 13.7 7.5 4.3
2006 ANA 28 155 683 161 23 8 9 65 100 2 52 16 .267 .336 .376 91 -4.1 4.9 7.1 2.9
2007 ANA 29 115 503 146 24 6 3 51 81 0 41 12 .330 .393 .432 106 6.6 9.0 -5.7 2.5
2008 ANA 30 116 520 125 14 1 1 62 80 3 34 13 .276 .367 .318 90 -3.5 2.5 4.6 2.0
2009 ANA 31 158 729 183 30 7 5 101 114 1 42 17 .298 .395 .393 110 13.9 5.1 19.3 6.2
2010 SEA 32 161 702 156 21 2 1 74 114 3 42 15 .259 .340 .306 80 -12.9 2.2 -13.9 -0.6
2011 SEA 33 81 313 54 11 1 1 21 42 0 11 6 .188 .241 .243 63 -12.0 0.1 1.3 -0.1
2012 SEA 34 66 194 30 5 2 2 19 48 0 4 1 .181 .262 .271 56 -9.2 -0.8 -1.2 -0.7
2014 LAN 36 38 76 13 3 0 0 14 15 1 4 1 .217 .373 .267 94 -0.2 2.6 1.2 0.6
Career128253601298188583554083210341119.276.349.36391-27.744.616.019.5

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G PA oppAVG oppOBP oppSLG BABIP BPF BRAA repLVL POS_ADJ DRC+ DRC+ SD FRAA BRR DRAA BWARP
1998 POR A- 0 295 .000 .000 .000 .354 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1999 SLM A+ 0 488 .000 .000 .000 .296 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2000 SLM A+ 0 590 .000 .000 .000 .345 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2001 ARK AA 39 158 .000 .000 .000 .322 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2001 CAR AA 86 382 .000 .000 .000 .270 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2002 ANA MLB 15 12 .276 .351 .444 .286 91 -1.9 0.3 0 59 19 0.0 0.9 -0.6 0.1
2002 SLC AAA 125 580 .000 .000 .000 .349 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2003 ANA MLB 71 270 .267 .330 .421 .345 99 -2.5 7.4 0.7 71 14 -3.2 2.5 -8.6 -0.1
2003 SLC AAA 68 321 .000 .000 .000 .344 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2004 ANA MLB 148 638 .268 .334 .428 .346 103 0.9 19.0 2.3 97 18 -0.8 1.8 1.9 2.4
2005 ANA MLB 158 720 .267 .326 .421 .331 97 10.1 20.7 -0.1 96 12 7.5 13.7 0.9 4.3
2006 ANA MLB 155 683 .273 .335 .431 .303 102 -7.3 20.6 0.8 91 14 7.1 4.9 -4.1 2.9
2007 ANA MLB 115 503 .271 .336 .423 .391 100 16.1 14.9 1.1 106 17 -5.7 9.0 6.6 2.5
2007 SLC AAA 4 15 .253 .327 .398 .357 130 0.7 0.5 0 93 8 -0.2 -0.9 0.0 -0.1
2008 ANA MLB 116 520 .271 .337 .426 .333 104 -7.6 15.0 1.7 90 14 4.6 2.5 -3.5 2.0
2008 SLC AAA 3 12 .305 .355 .469 .286 122 -0.8 0.4 0.1 93 5 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.1
2009 ANA MLB 158 729 .261 .329 .415 .356 103 17 21.0 2.6 110 14 19.3 5.1 13.9 6.2
2010 SEA MLB 161 702 .257 .321 .402 .314 98 -14.3 19.4 -0.9 80 15 -13.9 2.2 -12.9 -0.6
2011 SEA MLB 81 313 .256 .317 .395 .215 95 -19 8.4 1.1 63 15 1.3 0.1 -12.0 -0.1
2012 SEA MLB 66 194 .249 .314 .397 .237 92 -10 5.3 -0.7 56 18 -1.2 -0.8 -9.2 -0.7
2014 LAN MLB 38 76 .247 .316 .385 .289 98 0.1 2.0 0.1 94 23 1.2 2.6 -0.2 0.6
2014 ABQ AAA 19 74 .288 .351 .443 .367 106 -0.3 2.2 0.1 94 2 0.8 -0.2 -0.1 0.3

Statistics For All Levels

Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
Year Team Lg PA AB R H 2B 3B HR TB RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG ISO SF SH
1998 POR A- 295 269 41 76 9 3 1 94 26 24 56 25 4 .283 .346 .349 .067 0 0
1999 SLM A+ 488 444 65 106 12 3 0 124 22 41 86 27 13 .239 .307 .279 .041 0 0
2000 SLM A+ 590 522 92 145 26 14 3 208 48 67 107 37 19 .278 .361 .398 .121 0 0
2001 ARK AA 158 138 21 37 12 2 0 53 12 14 26 7 2 .268 .329 .384 .116 3 3
2001 CAR AA 382 332 41 73 14 5 2 103 25 40 73 27 8 .220 .303 .310 .090 6 6
2002 ANA MLB 12 12 6 2 1 0 0 3 1 0 5 2 1 .167 .167 .250 .083 0 0
2002 SLC AAA 580 511 100 156 25 18 7 238 62 53 83 39 8 .305 .367 .466 .160 6 6
2003 SLC AAA 321 285 55 89 14 15 4 145 30 29 36 16 6 .312 .379 .509 .196 2 2
2003 ANA MLB 270 240 34 71 9 4 0 88 27 20 38 13 7 .296 .345 .367 .071 4 6
2004 ANA MLB 638 577 83 171 22 17 5 242 60 49 94 34 13 .296 .350 .419 .123 2 10
2005 ANA MLB 720 642 113 186 25 10 8 255 57 64 101 62 17 .290 .352 .397 .107 5 9
2006 ANA MLB 683 604 93 161 23 8 9 227 62 65 100 52 16 .267 .336 .376 .109 7 5
2007 SLC AAA 15 14 3 5 1 0 0 6 1 1 0 0 1 .357 .400 .429 .071 0 0
2007 ANA MLB 503 442 81 146 24 6 3 191 58 51 81 41 12 .330 .393 .432 .102 8 2
2008 ANA MLB 520 453 72 125 14 1 1 144 22 62 80 34 13 .276 .367 .318 .042 0 2
2008 SLC AAA 12 10 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 3 0 0 .200 .333 .200 .000 0 0
2009 ANA MLB 729 615 114 183 30 7 5 242 54 101 114 42 17 .298 .395 .393 .096 4 8
2010 SEA MLB 702 602 62 156 21 2 1 184 35 74 114 42 15 .259 .340 .306 .047 6 17
2011 SEA MLB 313 288 24 54 11 1 1 70 15 21 42 11 6 .188 .241 .243 .056 2 2
2012 SEA MLB 194 166 18 30 5 2 2 45 11 19 48 4 1 .181 .262 .271 .090 2 7
2014 ABQ AAA 74 63 12 18 3 0 0 21 3 11 14 2 1 .286 .392 .333 .048 0
2014 LAN MLB 76 60 8 13 3 0 0 16 1 14 15 4 1 .217 .373 .267 .050 0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr% CSAA
2008 2030 0.4951 0.3739 0.8709 0.5572 0.1941 0.9107 0.7588 0.1291 -0.0081
2009 3067 0.4607 0.3564 0.8609 0.5308 0.2074 0.9053 0.7638 0.1391 -0.0154
2010 2890 0.5076 0.3754 0.8618 0.5160 0.2305 0.9115 0.7470 0.1382 -0.0174
2011 1279 0.4707 0.4050 0.8842 0.5449 0.2806 0.9268 0.8105 0.1158 -0.0065
2012 761 0.5217 0.3732 0.7887 0.5088 0.2253 0.8564 0.6220 0.2113 -0.0070
2014 373 0.4906 0.3137 0.8547 0.3989 0.2316 0.8904 0.7955 0.1453 -0.0060
Career104000.48720.37080.86050.52720.22240.90660.75470.1395-0.0125

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2014-06-14 2014-08-06 15-DL 53 45 Left Thigh Strain Quadriceps -
2011-09-04 2011-09-29 DTD 25 24 Right Hip Strain Hip Flexor -
2011-08-02 2011-09-04 15-DL 33 30 Right Hip Strain Hip Flexor - -
2011-05-05 2011-05-06 DTD 1 1 General Medical Illness -
2011-04-12 2011-04-14 DTD 2 2 Left Thumb Contusion -
2010-06-21 2010-06-23 DTD 2 1 General Medical Illness -
2008-09-17 2008-09-22 DTD 5 5 Right Elbow Contusion HBP -
2008-09-09 2008-09-12 DTD 3 3 Right Elbow Contusion HBP -
2008-08-27 2008-08-28 DTD 1 1 Left Soreness Big Toe -
2008-06-26 2008-06-28 DTD 2 1 Right Knee Infection -
2008-05-22 2008-06-13 15-DL 22 19 Right Thigh Strain Hamstring -
2008-05-04 2008-05-21 15-DL 17 15 Right Thigh Strain Hamstring -
2008-03-24 2008-03-27 Camp 3 0 Left Fingers Tightness Between 2 Fingers -
2007-11-10 2007-11-10 Off 0 0 Left Wrist Surgery Hamate 2007-11-10
2007-08-22 2007-09-06 DTD 15 14 Left Wrist Sprain -
2007-03-31 2007-04-30 15-DL 30 25 Right Fingers Fracture Index and Middle Finger -
2007-03-22 2007-03-31 Camp 9 0 Right Fingers Fracture Index and Middle Finger -
2004-07-02 2004-07-04 DTD 2 2 Head Concussion Player Collision While Sliding Into Second Base -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2014 LAN $900,000
2013 SEA $8,500,000
2012 SEA $9,500,000
2011 SEA $9,500,000
2010 SEA $8,500,000
2009 ANA $5,775,000
2008 ANA $4,750,000
2007 ANA $3,500,000
2006 ANA $2,250,000
2005 ANA $390,000
2004 ANA $320,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
11 yrPrevious$53,885,000
11 yrTotal$53,885,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
9 y 145 dTommy Tanzer1 year/$0.9M (2014)

Details
  • 1 year (2014). Signed by LA Dodgers as a free agent 1/24/14 (minor-league contract). Salary of $0.9M in majors, $0.12M in minors. Performance bonuses: $25,000 each for 200, 275 plate appearances. $50,000 each for 300, 325, 350, 375 PA. $75,000 each for 400, 425, 450 PA. Contract selected by LA Dodgers 3/17/14. DFA by LA Dodgers 8/6/14. Released 8/13/14. Retired 3/20/16.
  • 1 year (2013). Signed by Miami as a free agent 2/8/13 (minor-league contract). Released by Miami 3/20/13.
  • 4 years/$36M (2010-13), plus 2014 option. Signed by Seattle as a free agent 12/8/09. $2M signing bonus. 10:$8M, 11:$9M, 12:$9M, 13:$8M, 14:$9M vesting option. 2014 option guaranteed with 600 PAs in 2013. DFA by Seattle 11/20/12. Released 11/28/12.
  • 1 year/$5.775M (2009). Re-signed by LA Angels 1/14/09 (avoided arbitration). Award bonuses: $50,000 for All Star. $75,000 each for Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, LCS MVP. $0.1M for WS MVP. $0.15M for MVP ($75,000 for 2nd or 3rd in vote, $50,000 for 4th or 5th)
  • 3 years/$10.5M (2006-08). Re-signed by LA Angels 1/06 (avoided arbitration as Super 2). 06:$2.25M, 07:$3.5M, 08:$4.75M
  • 1 year/$0.39M (2005). Re-signed by LA Angels 3/05
  • 1 year/$0.32M (2004). Re-signed by LA Angels 2/04

2018 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG TAv VORP FRAA WARP
Weighted Mean???????????.000.000.000.0000.0?0.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index )

Rank Score Name Year COMP_DRC_PLUS Trend

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2015 One of the best spoonerisms on the team, Fone Chiggins (or, if you're a phonetic absolutist, Fawn Shiggins) actually provided value for the Dodgers in 2014. After he basically did not try in Seattle, the Dodgers took a flyer on the former six-win player, and Figgins rewarded them with more than half a win in 38 games before being designated for assignment on August 6th. It was a low-risk, low-reward move for the Dodgers, and they definitely got their money's worth out of what was probably Figgins' final go-'round in the majors.
2013 Figgins spent yet another full season on the Mariners’ active roster, but set a new low for playing time and started only nine games after July 1, and one in September. Just two players have a worse OPS over the past two seasons (minimum 300 PA), and his negative WARP per plate appearance has gotten worse each year in Seattle. He played some center field for the first time since 2006, which is the sort of thing that would help him land a job elsewhere if he had even one other marketable skill. The Mariners finally released Figgins in November.
2012 "I'm going to be great again," Figgins said in September. "The best part is I'm not worried about it." In other words, the "best part" of hitting .188 with no power and almost shockingly deteriorated baserunning is that Chone Figgins ain't bumming. The rest of the Seattle organization, though, is. Should they pay Figgins $17 million to play the next two seasons or pay Figgins $17 million to sit at home and scroll through the Netflix Instant offerings? The best argument for the former is that Figgins has been bad before, for stretches of hundreds of at bats, and bounced back to play at near-MVP levels. The best argument for the latter is that, the above statement aside, he has reportedly been testy with one manager and the media, and he is a boo magnet for Seattle's paying customers. His age makes a bounceback less likely than ever, and his tools—speed, defense, and power—are crumbling.
2011 The Mariners went 1-for-2 on their pre-season positional switcheroo, as Jose Lopez picked up where Adrian Beltre left off at third, but Figgins struggled at the keystone. Seattle’s game of musical infield positions seemed curious from the start, given the overwhelming evidence that the glorified utilityman does his best defensive work at the hot corner. After slightly more than 2,200 innings at second and over twice that total at third, Figgins now sports a –46.4 Fielding Runs Above Average at the former position and a 43.7 mark at the latter, so it would appear that the M’s committed the cardinal sin of messing with a good thing when they tried to transplant their new acquisition. On the surface, the ex-Angel’s performance at the plate looked like the more unexpected aspect of his season, but after adjusting for park, it becomes clear that his output was hardly unprecedented—since 2004, the diminutive switch-hitter has alternated productive and similarly unproductive years at the plate, as fluctuations in his BABIP have dictated his offensive value. With Jose Lopez gone, Figgins should get to return to the hot corner.
2010 Talk about a walk year: in the final season of his contract, Figgins burnished his credentials as an elite leadoff hitter by leading the AL in bases on balls and ranking second in both times on base and runs scored, third in steals, and fourth in pitches per plate appearance. It was no fluke; his walk rate has improved in six straight years, his P/PA in three straight, but his 2007-2008 injuries concealed those advances. His defense, which was good in 2008, was off-the-charts outstanding across the major systems; he led all third basemen in FRAA and Plus/Minus runs saved (+30) while placing third in UZR (+16.7). The only ding on his performance was a league-leading caught-stealing total, but even with -3.35 EqSBR, you can see that his overall baserunning was a plus. In all, his season priced him out of the suddenly cost-conscious Angels' range—perhaps not the worst thing in the world as he heads into his mid-30s—but his four-year, $36 million deal from the Mariners was nonetheless a reasonable one.
2009 Figgins had a lot of value as a super-sub who could play anywhere on the field, draw same walks, run like the wind, and smack enough doubles and triples to get his slugging percentage up around .400, but as an everyday third baseman who stopped hitting balls into the gaps, he's become something less than an asset. The Angels might try to fill their hole in left with Figgins, which really wouldn't be any better than playing him at the hot corner; they'd be best served by returning him to the super-utility role again.
2008 The broken fingers Figgins suffered in spring training cost him the season's first month and may have affected him in its second. Figgins was batting just .133/.212/.211 on May 29 and was benched both that day and the next against the Mariners. When he returned, he went 3-for-4 and never looked back, batting .381/.438/.489 the rest of the way. Overall, Figgins' 2006 and 2007 seasons average to his career norms; the balls that didn't fall in two years ago did so last year, and then some. Figgins played just three positions last year, and was the when-healthy regular at one-third base-for the first time in his career. Although the Angels' need for power will probably force Figgins back into a utility role this year with Wood taking over at third, Figgins will still play 140 games in that role.
2007 Much as we might wish it, he`s not the kinder, gentler Tony Phillips for a new generation, he`s just Figgy, pretty useful ballplayer. The drop-off last season wasn`t an injury, he just got off to a slow start and didn`t turn it around--he still walked as often, and had as much power, but he lost that proverbial extra gork per week that makes all the difference. He also hasn`t done anything against lefties in the last couple of years, which eats into his utility as an everyday leadoff man. Unlike most speedsters, he`s not some slap-hitter who can easily be overpowered with men on base. With Gary Matthews Jr. signed for way too much for way too long and Juan Rivera recovering from a broken leg, he`ll be going back to roving, splitting time between third, left, center, second, and wherever else Scioscia decides to plug him in on a day-to-day basis.
2006 Figgins isn`t the MVP candidate that John Kruk claims he is, but with his skill on the bases and ability to man every position at the Big A from centerfield to ticket taker, he is quite valuable. Scioscia can slot him anywhere there is an injury and avoid putting a replacement-level player at that position. The Angels can depend on decent, but not great, defensive play, an above-average on-base percentage, and excellent speed. No other team in the division, maybe even the league, carries a player with that kind of versatility. Consider the Rangers, who played Mark DeRosa in right field at times, the Mariners, with their half-season of Bloomquisting themselves into the dirt, or the A`s, who had to give up Moneyball for Scutaro-ball. Figgins protects the Angels from having to use those kinds of players. That`s something, even if his bat lacks pop.
2005 The Gil McDougald of the Angels, and Scioscia's number one claim to managerial brilliance. For those not hip to Gil, McDougald played for the Yankees from 1951 to 1960. It was Casey Stengel's great insight that McDougald had the defensive chops to play second, short, or third and be a Gold Glove-quality defender at all three positions while still providing above-average pop for an infielder. Stengel could then realign his defense from year to year and day to day without sacrifice. Ironically, when he was traded to the Angels in the 1960, McDougald retired rather than go west.

With Figgins, Anaheim finally gets to see what it missed, though Figgins' value is more in his batting average, speed, and versatility than in any defensive excellence. In addition to third and center, he also appeared in left, right, second and short. At the plate, he broke the franchise record for triples by a wide margin, which boosted his slugging percentage to .419—Figgins' power is his speed, and for now that's his whole game. Like most Angels, Figgins doesn't walk much. If he learns, he could be the new Tony Phillips, a player among Figgins' list of PECOTA comps and a hugely valuable player in his prime.
2004 Figgins's slugging average is a bit inflated, because he hits a lot of triples that have more to do with his speed than his power. It doesn't distort evaluations of his value, however; that same speed means that his OBP is more valuable than that of a player with average speed, because Figgins is more likely to take extra bases on other peoples' hits. The two factors more or less cancel out for players of this type. Figgins will get plenty of playing time for the 2004 Angels, with a shot at the everyday job in center. Defensively, he's an infielder though, and why the Angels would move a great center fielder like Erstad to first base so they can put a converted shortstop in center field ... the mind boggles.
2003 Figgins is an incredibly speedy second baseman who basically served as a ballistic missile for the Angels during the second half of the 2002 season. Tim Salmon clogging the bases as the tying run in the 8th? No problem. Send Chone in. Figgins does have some skills beyond blazing speed, though. His defense is coming together nicely, he’s shown a decent batting eye, and it’s eye-popping to watch him take off when he slashes a ball into the gap. There’s not really much of an opportunity for him in Anaheim right now, but under the right circumstances and with a little development, he could bring enough to the table to be a productive regular. That means 15 more hits and 10 more walks a year.
2001 Definitely a scouty sort of player, Chone Figgins might have a nifty name, but he’s a ham-handed infielder. How many guys move off of shortstop and do even worse at second base? Not many, though Wil Cordero and Shawon Dunston come to mind. Figgins doesn’t throw as hard as either of them and still committed 38 errors. Although he made progress as a hitter, he was repeating a level, so wait and see what he does at Double-A before getting excited.
2000 He’s here for one of two reasons: because the Rockies’ farm system is not as well-stocked as Chris Kahrl’s refrigerator, or because he’s got the coolest name in baseball since Razor Shines hung ’em up. You be the judge.

BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Chone Figgins

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2014-02-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hi R.J., Read recently where Adam Eaton said he'd like to have an OBA of .400 and steal 40 bases. I know he's done it in AAA but do you think that's realistic with the Sox ?
(Pete from Chicago)
Pete, I like Eaton as a player and as an acquisition, but he's unlikely to hit those marks. We haven't seen a player pull off 40/.400 since Bobby Abreu in 2004, and it's only been done four other times since the latest round of expansion. Of course there have been three close calls over the past five seasons: Mike Trout missed out by one point of OBP in 2012; same with Matt Kemp in 2011; and Chone Figgins was within five points in 2009. It's just a tough combination to achieve.

Figgins is probably the best-case scenario for Eaton, as he lacks Trout and Kemp's strength. Still, I think it's more likely that he hits around .270, which ... just to do the math ... assuming he gets 500 AB and maintains his current HBP and SF rates ... he'd need about 96 walks to get a .400 OBP. That's a ~16 percent walk rate, or what would've been the second-highest rate last season in the majors.

So no, I don't think those are realistic expectations for Eaton. He should help the White Sox nonetheless. (R.J. Anderson)
2012-11-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Considering the Rays luck with "buy-low" types of guys, plus noted possible interest in Chone Figgins and Ryan Raburn, does either player have anything serviceable left in them to make them another possible future success story for the team? Chone's tenure in Seattle seems to say that he wasn't a great everyday starter, but definitely didn't deserve to get mothballed as he did(considering Seattle's lineup and Safeco's park factors). Also, which team sounds most likely to give Grady Sizemore or Jason Bay long enough looks to see if either can regain past statuses as star-level players?
(jlarsen from chicago)
I don't know--what about Figgins suggests that he has something left? It doesn't seem to me that he was unjustly marginalized in Seattle. I'd rather take a chance on Raburn.

I'd say the Indians would be a favorite for both Sizemore and Bay, though both players are probably "minor-league deal with invite to spring training" types at this point? (Ben Lindbergh)
2012-11-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Please tell loyal readers in Seattle that we don't need to summon sacrifices for BP events to happen here...I suggested that to Kevin Goldstein but he may travel on Houston 's budget now.
(Jim from Seattle)
Now that the Mariners have released Chone Figgins, Seattle is safe for BP events again. (Ben Lindbergh)
2012-06-29 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Jay, After reading Jason Park's piece on Smoak, I was curious if you thought any of his struggles (and Montero's) were in part due the hitting coach. I realize Smoak has major issues, but the fact that the Mariners have made no progress in helping to resolve them, coupled with Montero's regression, makes me wonder. Is it too late to send Montero down in order to stop running the clock while he's hitting at a replacement level? Should they get him to learn 1B at AAA?
(Nick Stone from New York, NY)
Hey Nick, I wonder about the quality of instruction the young hitters are receiving in Seattle - note that Dustin Ackley is struggling as well (.240/.319/.332). I believe that old friend Chris Chambliss is currently the hitting coach, the third one in four or five seasons (http://blog.seattlepi.com/marinersfanblog/2011/07/06/revolving-door-mariner-hitting-coach/). Maybe his approach just isn't working for the kids.

That said, Safeco Field is a very tough place to hit, and I don't know whether there are weather/climate factors that have made it particularly tough this year beyond what we might have expected. Veterans like Ichiro have seen their performances collapse, Chone Figgins has never been the same since he hit town, and the road is littered with failed Mariners prospects. Maybe they need to think about adjusting the fences slightly to make it an easier place to hit.

I do think the Mariners should send Montero down at some point in order to recover what may be a lost year from an arbitration/free agency standpoint. That said, Safeco is a particularly tough environment for righties. (Jay Jaffe)
2012-06-12 13:00:00 (link to chat)Billy Hamilton's ETA? Is he a modern day Vince Coleman?
(jpmargo3 from New Jersey)
You know, I'd love to see him in September. I don't know if that will ultimately make sense for the Reds, because of service time and all that, but September and October are the months when a team can really go insane with tactical stuff and where a specialized runner can actually make sense. I remember Chone Figgins making a pretty big impact on the 2002 Angels as nothing more than a pinch-runner, for instance. I remember that. I can't actually say it's true, but I remember it. I think I'll spend some time later looking it up.

Hamilton, though. So fast. It would interesting to try to figure out just how much the world's greatest baserunner could conceivably be worth if his legs were highly leveraged. (Sam Miller)
2010-10-14 13:00:00 (link to chat)Should the Indians be more resigned (Jayson Nix), hopeful (Cord Phelps), risk-taking (Lonnie Chisenhall), or irrationally imaginative (trade prospects for Chone Figgins + much cash, or Travis Hafner for Figgins straight up) with their third base situation? I am not excited about a potential Brandon Inge Era.
(buffum from Austin TX)
When you are where the Indians are, I think a combination of hopeful and risk-taking is the way to go about things. The last thing we need is to bring Figgins aboard so we can have this conversation again in three years when his contract is expiring. (Marc Normandin)
2010-05-11 16:30:00 (link to chat)So, I have Chone Figgins, Hunter Pence, Aaron Hill, and Edwin Jackson on my fantasy team. My question: shouldn't I expect big bounce backs from everyone here or did I just select duds?
(Nasi Goreng from SE Asia)
Chone Figgins-- His K-rate has shot up this year. The BABIP drop is small enough and it looks likely to fix itself, but the K-rate is just so high that he's not going to be effective when he's striking out like a power hitter. Even BABIP Superstars need to be make contact to keep their job-- you don't commit $45MM to Fred Lewis. Maybe a new hitting coach helps?

Aaron Hill-- His BABIP is .210 because he's not hitting line dirves-- it seems related to him swinging at too many pitches out of the strike zone. Before he hit 32 HR, pitchers would challenge him more. Now he needs to be more patient.

Hunter Pence-- he isn't swinging any more often than he used to, but he can't seem to tell a ball from a strike anymore. Worse, he's actually making contact with those bad pitches and isn't hitting them hard.

Edwin Jackson is an average pitcher. He's not as good his 2009 or as bad as his early 2010. (Matt Swartz)
2009-12-15 14:00:00 (link to chat)With Lackey now in Boston and Halladay nearly joining him on the right coast, the market seems pretty bare of potential FOTR guys. Where does that leave a team like the LAofA Angles? Do they just have to go to battle with Kaz-Weaver-Saunders and hope Godzilla offsets the loss of Chone Figgins?
(Lincoln from Dallas)
If there's anyone who's lost ground this winter, it's the Angels of Anaheim. Godzilla isn't the answer, he's just a patch to keep their bid going while they come up with something bigger. While I speculated as far as Sheets, I think that's the kind of situation they're left with, mooting the virtues of a Sheets or a Bedard... or trying to swing a deal of their own to add one of the Braves' extras, for example. I guess I wouldn't hate the suggestion of their getting in on Pineiro is his expectations came down a bit. (Christina Kahrl)
2009-11-24 13:00:00 (link to chat)I'm interested in your thoughts about the shape of the offseason. It seemed like last year everybody was waiting for Manny to sign to begin the cascade of other signings. Who is the player who fits that role this year (if anyone) and, holy mackerel, is it possible that it's Chone Figgins? He seems to be on many teams' radar and is also central to whether the Angels pursue Lackey (they've said they can only sign one of the two), which begins the pitching cascade. If I'm crazy, please don't tell me.
(Rob from Alaska)
I actually think the reverse is going to happen with Figgins. We'll see something like Detroit re-sign Polanco, the Phillies re-sign DeRosa, and Beltre go somewhere on a 2-20 with a 3rd yr option, meaning that Figgins won't get anywhere near the 5-50 his agent has been touting. Add in the lack of any superb pitchers aside from John Lackey and an eerily long list of injury prone starters and it might not be that teams are waiting for someone to set the market but rather taking much more time deciding to whom they should open their checkbooks. (Eric Seidman)
2009-12-01 13:00:00 (link to chat)What do you think the real market for Chone Figgins is? Lots of rumored interest, but I wonder if he doesn't return to the Angels for less than he hoped. And if so, what's Brandon Wood in that scenario? Halladay fodder?
(Rob from Alaska)
I'm starting to think Brandon Wood isn't real. I don't mean that his production isn't real, but that he does not actually exist. I keep hearing things about him, and I see his numbers, but I don't think I've had a Brandon Wood sighting in the wild that I remember. I think the Internet made him up to generate blog traffic. (Marc Normandin)
2009-11-02 15:00:00 (link to chat)Do you think Brandon Wood is freed from Mike Scioscia this offseason?
(Jack from LA)
Depends on how many of their FA hitters they lose. The Angels may need position players next year. Wood's future is tied to that of Chone Figgins. (Joe Sheehan)
2009-10-13 14:00:00 (link to chat)Best chat session ever, thanks Christina! If you are the Giants what are you looking to do this off-season? Also, presuming Molina's gone, where do you slot in Buster Posey into the offense?
(Parker from San Fran)
Fiddle, there's nary a mention of Ataturk or the invention of the stirrup's role at the Battle of Hastings, let alone any talk about the redemptive value of heavy metal. Now that'd be something, but I'll settle for baseball. ;)

They really should be in the market for a bat, because Ryan Garko's just a placeholder at first base--assuming they tender him. Perhaps they get in on Adrian Beltre or Chone Figgins, and move Sandoval to first; Figgins might be game for a move back to second, though, which would beat placing faith in Eugenio Velez. Posey and no more screwing around with not just leaving Fred Lewis be gives them enough runs and an improved defense. Spending high on the first basemen on the market isn't very attractive (Adam LaRoche) or comes with risk (Nick Johnson), so I guess I'd rather find ways to get Sandoval off of third base. (Christina Kahrl)
2009-10-13 14:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Christina- can Chone Figgins play SS? Wondering if the Cubs should try this, making Theriot a utility guy (assuming Baker is the everyday 2B). Thoughts?
(KRS from Chicago)
I think it's been far too long for Figgins to see him as a shortstop for anybody; I frankly don't know how well a move back to center would go, assuming they make Bradley go away and would be willing to put Fukudome back in right. From your comments, it seems as if Theriot's issue is his thorough adequacy, in a lineup that didn't get enough Aramis Ramirez and had to deal with Soto, Soriano, and Bradley delivering so much less than expected. That's not on Theriot, or at least it shouldn't be. (Christina Kahrl)
2009-10-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)Chone Figgins is not a "utility guy", he's the starting 3rd baseman for the Angels and the 2009 AL leader in walks.
(The Flying Bernard from Acton, MA)
There's a reason I write about baketball (and I know he's better than a typical utility guy, but he's played all over the place). (Kevin Pelton (Basketball))
2009-10-02 14:00:00 (link to chat)Does Chone Figgins solve some,most, or all of the Cubs problems next year... he can float between 2nd and CF, hit leadoff, OB%, little more speed in a useful role... but he's a bit more elderly than I'd like...
(strupp from Madison)
Yeah, I wanted to not like his free agency, but more and more, I think he might be a guy who sustains his value for a while. He has become a great leadoff guy with a broad base of skills. He does seem to play one position better than a bunch, and really, the flexibility he provides is overstated--he's been a 3B for three years, and has just 70 innings elsewhere the last two. The Cubs are a fit, but so are 25 other teams, including his current one. I think he ends up back in Anaheim. (Joe Sheehan)
2009-08-04 14:00:00 (link to chat)What does Brandon Wood have to do to get a shot other than get traded?
(Phil from LA)
Well, between Vlad Guerrero and Chone Figgins, you've got two big-name free agents-to-be on the roster, so as frustrating as it is to have to keep on waiting, it makes sense to wait and see if the market leaves them turning to him for 2010. (Christina Kahrl)
2009-02-10 14:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Christina! Thanks for the chat. I remember hearing a while ago of a possible Chone Figgins/Jermaine Dye trade. Who do you think makes out better if that were to have gone down? Also, who pitches best this year in your estimation: Lackey, Santana, or Saunders?
(Andrew from Fayetteville, NC)
No problem Andrew, even with official A-Rod Week underway, what really matters is pitchers and catchers reporting, and here we are, getting to talk about baseball. I'd like that swap for the Angels quite a bit, even if Figgy fixes the Sox's hole in center (and in the leadoff slot). So, while there's value for both clubs, the Angels' definite need for help in the power department really would make this more of a win for them, although adding Dye to the outfield crowd would make the question of what to do with Little Sarge that much more problematic. Lastly, Santana. I like Lackey a lot, but the answer to that question is Santana every day of every week, leap year-inclusive. (Christina Kahrl)
2008-11-03 13:30:00 (link to chat)Who has the most gas left in the tank: Adrian Beltre, Jim Thome, Paul Konerko, Raul Ibanez, or Chone Figgins? Which ones would you want on your team in '09?
(McGoldrick from Los Angeles)
That's not really a comparison of like to like, but I'd pick Figgins from among that crew, if only because speed guys seem to retain value wel enough. Beyond that, I'd take Beltre, but I can't say I'm wildly enthusiastic about any of them. It's easier to suggest that I'd put Paulie at the bottom of the pile, and work up from there. (Christina Kahrl)
2008-08-01 14:00:00 (link to chat)With all the pitching prospects, plus Zimmerman and now Bonifacio (and even the atty general now) would it make sense for the Nats to try to be a "pitching/defense" type team? The A's and Angels type success may be easier for them to accomplish than anything else.
(Charlie from Bethesda, MD)
Well, you have to have the right talent to make it work, and the Attorney General and Mr. Good Face (isn't that the translation of Bonifacio?) still don't add up to Chone Figgins and David Eckstein, to say nothing of the relative merits of the two pitching staffs.

What the Nats really need are for their high-upside hitters to stay healthy. With Johnson, Dukes, Peña, Kearns, Milledge and Zimmerman all seeing significant time on the DL, it's a tough row to hoe.

OK folks, one or two more and I'm out of here. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-03-03 13:00:00 (link to chat)Eugenio Velez already has 5 steals this spring for the Giants. Will he make the roster, and does he has Chone Figgins potential?
(Jay from DC)
I'm not a big Velez believer at all. He's kinda 75% of Chone Figgins. He's very fast and can play multiple positions, but he's really not good at any up the middle position other than second base and he has no plate discipline. For me, he's closer to Freddy Bynum than Chone Figgins. (Kevin Goldstein)
2008-01-25 13:30:00 (link to chat)Which teams do you see running more in 2008 based on managerial, coaching, or philosophical changes to game management?
(DB from New York)
It's interesting that it doesn't seem as if many teams other than the Angels and Mariners (in the Mike Hargrove era anyway) talk about a baserunning philosophy.

But given the fact that in the end it means something on the order of a swing of 3 wins from top to bottom, perhaps teams inheretly do give it the appropriate emphasis.

That said, success on the bases seems to be driven entirely by personnel and not coaching. The Angels typically do well (and they may be an excpetion) but they also have had personnel (Chone Figgins and Orlando Cabrera are two notable examples) that could contribute.

A fellow SABR member, Neal Williams, and I did a study on the effect of third base coaches that was published as two articles on the Baseball Analysts site and will come out in a few weeks in The Baseball Research Journal volume 36. There, using a subset of EqHAR, we could detect no statistically significant skill for third base coaches from year to year.

That is likely the case becase the skill of the personnel swamp the little bit of help or non-help they get from their coaches (even "Waving Wendell" Kim in the long run). It could also be the case that most coaches are at the same skill level and the metric, coupled with the influence mentioned above, is too course-grained to capture it.

Thanks for the question. (Dan Fox)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2010-04-05 09:30:00Season Opener RoundtableAnd walked his first batter (Chone Figgins), and allowed his first run, on a Casey Kotchman double of all things. Not that such a thing is impossible, but it's Casey Kotchman. (Christina Kahrl)
2009-10-28 17:00:002009 WS Game OneIt's surprising just how bad a postseason hitter Jorge Posada has been in his 25 series. He's not Chone Figgins bad, but for ~100 games, he's roughly .235/.350/.390. (Steven Goldman)
 

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