Biographical

Portrait of Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling PPhillies

Phillies Player Cards | Phillies Team Audit | Phillies Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years G IP W L SV ERA WARP
20 569 3261 216 146 22 3.46 103.7
Birth Date11-14-1966
Height6' 5"
Weight205 lbs
Age52 years, 11 months, 5 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
1988 BAL MLB 4 4 14.7 0 3 0 22 10 4 3 98 13.5 6.1 1.8 2.5 0% .328 2.18 7.18 9.82 141 8.84 212.8 -0.7
1989 BAL MLB 5 1 8.7 0 1 0 10 3 6 2 100 10.4 3.1 2.1 6.2 0% .296 1.50 5.50 6.23 104 4.21 101.4 0.1
1990 BAL MLB 35 0 46.0 1 2 3 38 19 32 1 97 7.4 3.7 0.2 6.3 0% .266 1.24 2.93 2.54 106 4.07 94.9 0.4
1991 HOU MLB 56 0 75.7 3 5 8 79 39 71 2 96 9.4 4.6 0.2 8.4 0% .344 1.56 2.80 3.81 83 3.02 69.9 1.7
1992 PHI MLB 42 26 226.3 14 11 2 165 59 147 11 101 6.6 2.3 0.4 5.8 0% .227 0.99 2.90 2.35 86 2.77 67.2 6.0
1993 PHI MLB 34 34 235.3 16 7 0 234 57 186 23 99 8.9 2.2 0.9 7.1 0% .296 1.24 3.44 4.02 79 3.08 66.5 6.7
1994 PHI MLB 13 13 82.3 2 8 0 87 28 58 10 102 9.5 3.1 1.1 6.3 0% .295 1.40 4.36 4.48 104 4.39 88.5 1.4
1995 PHI MLB 17 17 116.0 7 5 0 96 26 114 12 100 7.4 2.0 0.9 8.8 0% .264 1.05 3.19 3.57 76 2.65 54.3 4.1
1996 PHI MLB 26 26 183.3 9 10 0 149 50 182 16 98 7.3 2.5 0.8 8.9 0% .277 1.09 3.10 3.19 72 2.61 51.5 6.8
1997 PHI MLB 35 35 254.3 17 11 0 208 58 319 25 99 7.4 2.1 0.9 11.3 0% .304 1.05 2.58 2.97 54 2.15 44.7 10.3
1998 PHI MLB 35 35 268.7 15 14 0 236 61 300 23 99 7.9 2.0 0.8 10.0 0% .305 1.11 2.69 3.25 57 2.16 44.8 10.9
1999 PHI MLB 24 24 180.3 15 6 0 159 44 152 25 99 7.9 2.2 1.2 7.6 0% .263 1.13 4.00 3.54 85 3.19 62.1 5.8
2000 ARI 0 13 13 97.7 5 6 0 94 13 72 10 112 8.7 1.2 0.9 6.6 0% .287 1.10 3.31 3.69 77 3.18 61.3 3.2
2000 PHI 0 16 16 112.7 6 6 0 110 32 96 17 104 8.8 2.6 1.4 7.7 0% .284 1.26 4.19 3.91 86 3.36 64.6 3.5
2001 ARI MLB 35 35 256.7 22 6 0 237 39 293 37 104 8.3 1.4 1.3 10.3 0% .307 1.08 3.06 2.98 67 2.35 48.7 9.8
2002 ARI MLB 36 35 259.3 23 7 0 218 33 316 29 108 7.6 1.1 1.0 11.0 0% .297 0.97 2.30 3.23 50 1.95 41.8 10.7
2003 ARI MLB 24 24 168.0 8 9 0 144 32 194 17 103 7.7 1.7 0.9 10.4 0% .297 1.05 2.60 2.95 60 2.15 45.1 6.7
2004 BOS MLB 32 32 226.7 21 6 0 206 35 203 23 112 8.2 1.4 0.9 8.1 0% .284 1.06 3.21 3.26 75 2.99 61.8 6.9
2005 BOS MLB 32 11 93.3 8 8 9 121 22 87 12 107 11.7 2.1 1.2 8.4 0% .371 1.53 3.65 5.69 84 3.58 77.1 2.0
2006 BOS MLB 31 31 204.0 15 7 0 220 28 183 28 106 9.7 1.2 1.2 8.1 0% .324 1.22 3.63 3.97 78 3.53 71.9 5.0
2007 BOS MLB 24 24 151.0 9 8 0 165 23 101 21 103 9.8 1.4 1.3 6.0 0% .296 1.25 4.27 3.87 95 4.25 87.9 2.4
2000 TOT MLB 29 29 210.3 11 12 0 204 45 168 27 108 8.7 1.9 1.2 7.2 0% .000 1.18 3.78 3.81 82 3.28 63.0 6.6
CareerMLB5694363261.021614622299871131163471038.32.01.08.644%.2931.143.203.46742.8659.9103.7

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg LG G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
1988 BAL MLB AL 4 4 14.7 0 3 0 22 10 4 3 98 13.5 6.1 1.8 2.5 0% .328 2.18 7.18 9.82 141 8.84 212.8
1989 BAL MLB AL 5 1 8.7 0 1 0 10 3 6 2 100 10.4 3.1 2.1 6.2 0% .296 1.50 5.50 6.23 104 4.21 101.4
1990 BAL MLB AL 35 0 46.0 1 2 3 38 19 32 1 97 7.4 3.7 0.2 6.3 0% .266 1.24 2.93 2.54 106 4.07 94.9
1991 HOU MLB NL 56 0 75.7 3 5 8 79 39 71 2 96 9.4 4.6 0.2 8.4 0% .344 1.56 2.80 3.81 83 3.02 69.9
1992 PHI MLB NL 42 26 226.3 14 11 2 165 59 147 11 101 6.6 2.3 0.4 5.8 0% .227 0.99 2.90 2.35 86 2.77 67.2
1993 PHI MLB NL 34 34 235.3 16 7 0 234 57 186 23 99 8.9 2.2 0.9 7.1 0% .296 1.24 3.44 4.02 79 3.08 66.5
1994 PHI MLB NL 13 13 82.3 2 8 0 87 28 58 10 102 9.5 3.1 1.1 6.3 0% .295 1.40 4.36 4.48 104 4.39 88.5
1995 PHI MLB NL 17 17 116.0 7 5 0 96 26 114 12 100 7.4 2.0 0.9 8.8 0% .264 1.05 3.19 3.57 76 2.65 54.3
1996 PHI MLB NL 26 26 183.3 9 10 0 149 50 182 16 98 7.3 2.5 0.8 8.9 0% .277 1.09 3.10 3.19 72 2.61 51.5
1997 PHI MLB NL 35 35 254.3 17 11 0 208 58 319 25 99 7.4 2.1 0.9 11.3 0% .304 1.05 2.58 2.97 54 2.15 44.7
1998 PHI MLB NL 35 35 268.7 15 14 0 236 61 300 23 99 7.9 2.0 0.8 10.0 0% .305 1.11 2.69 3.25 57 2.16 44.8
1999 PHI MLB NL 24 24 180.3 15 6 0 159 44 152 25 99 7.9 2.2 1.2 7.6 0% .263 1.13 4.00 3.54 85 3.19 62.1
2000 ARI MLB NL 13 13 97.7 5 6 0 94 13 72 10 112 8.7 1.2 0.9 6.6 0% .287 1.10 3.31 3.69 77 3.18 61.3
2000 PHI MLB NL 16 16 112.7 6 6 0 110 32 96 17 104 8.8 2.6 1.4 7.7 0% .284 1.26 4.19 3.91 86 3.36 64.6
2001 ARI MLB NL 35 35 256.7 22 6 0 237 39 293 37 104 8.3 1.4 1.3 10.3 0% .307 1.08 3.06 2.98 67 2.35 48.7
2002 ARI MLB NL 36 35 259.3 23 7 0 218 33 316 29 108 7.6 1.1 1.0 11.0 0% .297 0.97 2.30 3.23 50 1.95 41.8
2003 ARI MLB NL 24 24 168.0 8 9 0 144 32 194 17 103 7.7 1.7 0.9 10.4 0% .297 1.05 2.60 2.95 60 2.15 45.1
2004 BOS MLB AL 32 32 226.7 21 6 0 206 35 203 23 112 8.2 1.4 0.9 8.1 0% .284 1.06 3.21 3.26 75 2.99 61.8
2005 BOS MLB AL 32 11 93.3 8 8 9 121 22 87 12 107 11.7 2.1 1.2 8.4 0% .371 1.53 3.65 5.69 84 3.58 77.1
2006 BOS MLB AL 31 31 204.0 15 7 0 220 28 183 28 106 9.7 1.2 1.2 8.1 0% .324 1.22 3.63 3.97 78 3.53 71.9
2007 BOS MLB AL 24 24 151.0 9 8 0 165 23 101 21 103 9.8 1.4 1.3 6.0 0% .296 1.25 4.27 3.87 95 4.25 87.9

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr%

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2008-03-13 2008-10-20 60-DL 221 162 Right Shoulder Surgery Severing Biceps Tendon 2008-06-23
2007-06-19 2007-08-06 15-DL 48 42 Right Shoulder Inflammation -
2005-04-24 2005-07-13 60-DL 80 69 Right Ankle Contusion -
2005-03-26 2005-04-13 15-DL 18 7 Right Ankle Recovery From Surgery Peroneal Tendon Sheath Recovery 2004-11-08
2003-05-31 2003-07-12 15-DL 42 38 Right Hand Fracture 3rd and 4th Metacarpals -
2003-04-18 2003-05-03 15-DL 15 14 Right Abdomen Surgery Appendix 2003-04-18
2000-04-04 2000-04-30 15-DL 26 23 Right Shoulder Recovery From Surgery Anterior Capsule Thermal Shrinkage and Posterior Capsule Release 1999-12-13 -
1999-12-13 1999-12-13 Off 0 0 Right Shoulder Surgery Anterior Capsule Thermal Shrinkage and Posterior Capsule Release 1999-12-13 -
1999-09-09 1999-10-04 DTD 25 23 Right Shoulder Inflammation -
1999-08-08 1999-09-03 15-DL 26 23 Right Shoulder Inflammation Tendonitis - -
1996-04-02 1996-05-14 15-DL 42 36 Right Shoulder Recovery From Surgery SLAP Tear Labrum and Rotator Cuff Fraying and Bone Spur 1995-08-23 -
1995-07-19 1995-10-02 60-DL 75 69 Right Shoulder Surgery SLAP Tear Labrum and Rotator Cuff Fraying and Bone Spur 1995-08-23 -
1994-06-10 1994-06-10 On-Alr 0 0 Left Knee Surgery Popped As Getting Up From Chair 1994-06-10 -
1994-05-16 1994-07-25 15-DL 70 62 Right Elbow Surgery Bone Spur 1994-05-20 -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2008 BOS $8,000,000
2007 BOS $13,000,000
2006 BOS $13,000,000
2005 BOS $12,500,000
2004 BOS $12,000,000
2003 ARI $10,000,000
2002 ARI $10,000,000
2001 ARI $6,500,000
2000 PHI $5,650,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
9 yrPrevious$90,650,000
9 yrTotal$90,650,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
18 y 134 dEd Hayes

Details
  • 1 year/$8M (2008). Re-signed by Boston as a free agent 11/6/07. $0.5M one-time assignment bonus if traded. Performance bonuses: $0.375M each for 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190 & 200 IP. Award bonuses: $50,000 for All Star starter. $0.1M each for All Star, LCS MVP, WS MVP. $0.5M for Cy Young ($0.4M for 2nd, $0.3M for 3rd, $1M for receiving one Cy Young vote (1st, 2nd or 3rd). $2M in weight clauses ($333,333 each for maintaining weight in 6 random weigh-ins, one per month, during season). Perks: use of team uniform for charity events, suite for home-game starts and charity events, day care for home games, 6 season tickets in State Street Pavilion. Retired 3/09.
  • 3 years/$37.5M (2004-06), plus 2007 option. Signed extension with Boston 11/03 after agreeing to waive no-trade clause. 04:$12M, 05:$12.5M, 06:$13M, 07:$13M option. $13M 2007 option vested with 2004 World Series victory. Bonuses: $0.1M (All Star), $2M (if Boston wins World Series).
  • 3 years/$32M (2002-04). Signed extension with Arizona 12/15/00. 02:$10M, 03:$10M, 04:$12M. Half of salary each season deferred. $6M in performance bonuses.
  • 3 years/$15.45M (1998-2000), plus 2001 club option. Signed extension with Philadelphia 4/3/97. 98:$4.65M, 99:$5.15M, 00:$5.65M, 01:$6.5M club option. 2001 option guaranteed with 450 innings pitched in 1998-2000 (met). No-trade protection. Acquired by Arizona in trade with Philadelphia 7/00.
  • 1 year/$3.5M (1997)
  • 1 year/$2M (1996)
  • 1 year/$2.3M (1995). Re-signed by Philadelphia 12/16/94 (avoided arbitration).
  • 1 year/$2.3M (1994). Re-signed by Philadelphia 2/7/94 (avoided arbitration).
  • 1 year/$1.025M (1993).
  • 1 year/$0.205M (1992). Acquired by Philadelphia in trade from Houston 4/92.
  • 1 year/$0.125M (1991). Acquired by Houston in trade from Baltimore 1/91.
  • 1 year/$0.103M (1990) (Baltimore).
  • Acquired by Baltimore in trade from Boston 7/88.
  • Drafted by Boston 1986 (2-39) (Yavapai JC, Ariz.).

2019 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
Weighted Mean?????0.0?00?.0000.000.00?0.00.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index )

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2008 After he came off of the DL last August, Schilling appeared to make a conscious decision to throw strikes, and only strikes, and force the hitters to beat him. Counting the postseason, Schilling walked just seven men in his last 80 2/3 innings. It's an approach that will make him a league-average innings guy at age 40, and well worth the $11-13 million his incentive-laden contract will end up paying him.
2007 Though he didn`t reach the heights of 2004, Schilling sufficiently recovered from his famous ankle injury to reassert himself as a frontline starter in 2006, posting the top K/BB ratio of any ERA qualifier. That said, he showed some wear and tear. Early in the year, instability shortened his stride, causing his pitches to stay higher in the strike zone and offering clues that his ankle was still bothering him. A strained lat cost him a few September starts and may have factored into some second-half struggles (5.04 ERA over his final 11 starts). Still, simply by proving that reports of his demise were greatly exaggerated, Schilling`s 2006 has to be counted as a success, and while the normal precautions apply to a 40-year-old pitcher, he should be capable of a repeat in the finale of his four-year, $50.5-million deal.
2006 Although Red Sox Nation expects Schilling to be the ace of the rotation once again, there is plenty of reason to think that his ankle is never going to allow him to be the power pitcher he used to be. He`s a smart man and could probably gut through a couple of above-average seasons on finesse and guile. Although he remains a controversial figure wherever he goes, the story of his 2004 post-season becomes even more amazing as the extent of his injury becomes more apparent. It is said that an athlete should leave it "all" on the field. Schilling did just that.
2005 The Red Sox turned over seven players from the 2003 team that finished one pitch short of the World Series, but to hear some people tell it, if they'd only been able to bring in Schilling that would have been enough. Signer of one of the league's more interesting contracts, Schilling's 2005 salary jumps by $2 million and his $13 million option for 2007 was automatically vested the minute the Sox defeated the Cardinals. Signed to win the World Series, he delivered in storybook fashion. The only problem is that Boston is now stuck with the bill for a pitcher who's shown an increasing susceptibility to injuries and a declining strikeout rate through his age-40 season for a lot of money. For now, Schilling is still among the game's elite and the Sox are happy to trade the future risk for the present championship.
2004 Now that the Rocket's name is permanently blackened in Beantown by his happy ending in pinstripes, is there anyone better equipped to be the equally beefy doppelganger in Boston's emotional landscape? We know he's great when healthy, and you ought to worry that, reunited with Terry Francona, he'll get to dictate how long he stays in the game again. Schilling is at an age where he may not be good for 30 starts, multiplying the Pedro problem by two. But even so, Schilling Is moving out of a bandbox that tacked a half-run onto his ERA, and away from a weak defensive club. He's going to a more neutral park and playing for a team built to score runs anywhere, anytime. Sure, he'll have to face DHs, but he won't have to face the Red Sox. It isn't hard to envision an ERA under 3.00 in 20-25 starts, and if the self-management issue doesn't get out of hand, one of those insanely high winning percentage seasons you saw from David Cone and still get from Pedro.
2003 Americaís most famous Avalon Hill addict had another tremendous year, keeping up his half of the tremendous load. A rough September probably cost him the Cy Young, and advance scouting reports showed his velocity down toward the end of the season. If the D-Backs can find a way to give him 5% more rest, and maybe knock 20 innings off his season, thereís no reason to believe that he canít continue to be a nostril-flaring, angry, viciously precise flamethrower for several seasons to come. An absolute blast to watch on the mound.
2002 Itís hard to believe that all the abuse Schilling suffered at the hands of Terry Francona in Philadelphia hasnít had any ill effects on him, but itís clear that thatís the case. After a decade of effectiveness between injuries, Schilling has been healthy for most of the last five years and is coming off of a year in which he was the second-best starting pitcher in baseball. That success is not likely to last, given his history, so itís hard to blame the Diamondbacks for looking at 2001 as a one-shot deal.
2001 This is your basic problem player for any organization. My own half-baked theory is that watching Mitch Williams as he cost Curt Schilling his shot at a World Series ring has left Schilling unwilling to sit still when he thinks thereís an injustice that can be righted by him opening his mouth. Heíll almost never come off the mound if he can avoid it, fearful that those damned relievers are just going to blow the game, and heíd rather take the hit himself than get left with another might-have-been.

Only a manager with a lot of self-assurance is going to keep Schilling pitching effectively into his late thirties by making him learn to love those guys in the pen. Terry Francona was never going to stand up to Schilling, and I doubt Bob Brenly will, either. Schilling is smart (hey, heís the worldís most famous "Squad Leader" player, which is like passing the bar exam, only harder) and outspoken, which makes him a natural target for beat writers hungry for quotes or controversy. When things go sour, heíll be the first to complain; on an old, bad team, thatís going to be a problem. At his best, Roger Clemens Lite; just not a good bet to age well.
2000 The workload finally caught up to him last year. The team claims that the shoulder surgery he underwent in the offseason was minor, and that he should be back in mid-May. If the Phillies don't change how they use him, though, he may be back on the disabled list by September. Since his effectiveness frequently drops off sharply after 120 pitches anyway, there's really no reason not to change.
1999 Worth twice what they pay him, as he's now thrown over 700 innings of sub-3 DT-ERA ball over the last three years. Signing one more established starter may have the ripple effect of reducing Schilling's innings if the bullpen's workload drops on the days he isnít pitching, and given Schilling's history, that should be at the front of Wade's mind this winter.
1998 What can I add that you donít already know...an NL right-handed strikeout record, no... big contract extension through 2000, no... hey, he stole his first base last year. Thatís probably something.
1997 In 1995 he underwent surgery for a torn labrum, similar to what Met pitchers Jason Isringhausen and Paul Wilson underwent last September. Philly fans can be delighted that the results have been so successful for Curt Schilling; Iím not sure theyíd be as pleased if it works for the other guys.
1996  If he's healthy, he'll win. He can move his fastball at will, cutting or sinking, with excellent control. Although there's no shortage of reasons, losing Schilling probably ruined the Phillies' season. A good indication of how Jim Fregosi uses his pitchers: occasionally Schilling will run up some high pitch counts, but he hasn't worked on three days' rest in over five years. Another Phillies disappointment: Schilling usually has a great second half, with an ERA more than a run lower over the last five years. The injury put the kibosh on that happening again.

BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Curt Schilling

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2019-05-17 16:00:00 (link to chat)What is your favorite trade you've ever made, and how long did those negotiations last?
(Alex from BMore)
this might be my favorite question ever.

In an NL-only in the mid-1990s, I spent at least an hour on the phone trying to coax a trading partner to give me Curt Schilling for John Franco. The guy was clearly getting high on the phone (I could hear the gurgling of his bong) and there were these incredibly long pauses. I was getting impatient but I could tell he was going to eventually agree so I just sat through these long silences and finally got him to do the deal. (Mike Gianella)
2013-09-06 14:00:00 (link to chat)What types of non-throwing exercise is best for pitchers to develop functional strength? I'm thinking back a few years to Curt Schilling trying out pilates and wondered if that or yoga make for good off-season training.
(Randy from Syracuse)
I like a multi-faceted approach that emphasizes balance of functional strength and functional flexibility. Isometric exercises like pilates or yoga are great for pitchers for this reason. Another great exercise is surfing - the paddling is great for building back-side shoulder muscles, which function as the brakes once the ball leaves the hand.

On the jukebox: Metallica, "Motorbreath" (Doug Thorburn)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)Do you think some writers will hold a grudge against Glavine next year due to his imput on the 1994 Major League Baseball strike and drug testing as a players' union representative ?
(19braves77 from Pensacola. FL)
I voiced this opinion last night on Twitter. I think there's something to it, if you go back and look at the low votes for Ted Simmons, Joe Torre and more recently David Cone. Curt Schilling, a JAWS-approved candidate, himself noted that he felt his low vote share (38.8%) in part reflected his activity as a player representative who didn't do enough to combat PEDs during his time. For once, I agree with him.

Will it be enough to keep Glavine out? Possibly on the first ballot given the crowd of candidates, the tenor of the electorate, and the precedent of not all 300-game winners making it on the first try (Gaylord Perry, Don Sutton and Phil Niekro had to wait). He'll get his plaque eventually, though. (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2012-04-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)While most people say Roy Halladay is the best pitcher in baseball, am I crazy to think he's only a borderline Hall Of Famer right now?
(Andrew Stoeten from drunkjaysfans.com)
Given that we've seen just one starter get into the Hall with less than 300 wins over the past 20 years, I don't think you're crazy to say that at all. Halladay's at 190, and I think he's going to have to push well into the 240-250 range to satisfy the traditionalists. It helps that there's going to be a whole wave of non-300 win pitchers coming along (Pedro Martinez, John Smoltz, Mike Mussina and Curt Schilling) who are pretty fair candidates in their own rights, with considerable hardware and postseason resumes of their own. I think he gets there, but he's not a lock. (Jay Jaffe)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Jay - Do you feel that the Hall of Fame will start to give guidelines to the voters sooner rather than later when it comes to steroids? I have seen comments regarding how quickly Bagwell shrunk in size as to why someone was not going to vote for him (Chicago Tribune). As Phil Rogers says, 580+ writers, 580+ opinions on the matter. Thanks
(Brian from Tinley Park)
Good question. I think we're years away from that, because while there are several candidates about to hit the ballot whose careers have been linked to PED use, there are also a bunch of milestone candidates whose elections are a virtual lock. Even without Barry Bonds and Roger Clmeens, you'll still have Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Randy Johnson and Craig Biggio on that score, as well as solid candidates without the milestones OR PED connections such as John Smoltz and Curt Schilling. I think we're years away before the Hall feels a need to interject itself into the debate on the guideline grounds. (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2011-11-30 13:00:00 (link to chat)How many more "Halladay like" seasons does Halladay need to have before he's a lock for the Hall Of Fame?
(Kristina from Arizona)
A lock? I'd say 3-4. The voters haven't been very forgiving of guys with less than 300 wins (1 in 20 years, Blyleven) and they're about to get a slew of them for review (Pedro Martinez, John Smoltz, Curt Schilling, Mike Mussina) along with the 300-winners (Clemens, Maddux, Glavine, Johnson). The Cys are a great building block but Halladay still has work do do. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-11-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)Who gets in the Hall from the Kevin Brown/Curt Schilling/Mike Mussina triumvirate?
(Colin Jaffe from Cranford, NJ)
Last question today goes to a Jaffe. And much as I loathe Curt Schilling with every fiber of my being, I think his role in starring in the postseason and winning two world championships lifts him above the others here. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-09-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Thank you for the chat. Do you think Erik Bedard will make a close to full recovery and be effective for a few more years? Any other pitchers who have made it back from a torn labrum in their pitching shoulder?
(Sumi from Monterey Park)
Very few and most are extreme examples like Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling. I don't have a lot of hope for a Bedard return, but if I was his agent, I'd get him to Dave Duncan no matter what. (Will Carroll)
2009-08-19 14:00:00 (link to chat)The belief that the era of the 300-game winner ended with Randy Johnson seems to be pretty widespread. What kind of career numbers will the 21st-century starting pitcher have to post to be perceived as a "lock" Hall of Famer? Will 200 become the new 300?
(David from Evanston, IL)
The BBWAA hasn't elected a non-300 win starting pitcher since Ferguson Jenkins in 1990, so it's unclear exactly how good one will have to be. I examined this question last year and concluded that John Smoltz, Curt Schilling, Mike Mussina and Pedro Martinez -- all with 200+ wins, high strikeout totals and a solid handful of other accomplishments -- are all qualified to go in, and that Pedro's probably got the best shot from a traditional standpoint due to his high peak. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-03-03 13:00:00 (link to chat)I enjoyed your article on spring stats. What about pitchers' stats, especially pitchers who are battling to win a spot? Take Homer Bailey, for example. Does his super-efficient start from yesterday have meaning or is it just too small a sample size?
(theguag from Louisville)
Eventually I will take a look at the numbers at the end of spring training and see if there's anything to pull from, but for pitchers it's tough to gauge much. A lot of them are testing things out (do you know how many years Curt Schilling tried to learn a change up in the spring only to inevitably ditch it when he couldn't make it work?) I think I'm encouraged by health, velocity and command more than the numbers in the spring when it comes to pitching. Watching how guys stretch themselves out in starts, moving up from a few innings at a time to a full start's worth of batters faced, etc. I could dig deeper at some point, but those things are my first instinct as to what's important. (Marc Normandin)
2009-01-22 13:00:00 (link to chat)I have a business venture for you. We can start the Hall of Very Good players. We can place it in nearby Utica, NY and players like Jeff Kent, Sammy Sosa, Curt Schilling can headline our class in 5 years or so! What do you think?
(Ryan from NY)
Pass. While none of the players yo mention are slam dunks, all three have reasonable HOF cases and I would expect one or two of them to get in.

Besides, I'd favor Schenectady over Utica out of personal allegiance to a friend. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-01-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Joe, I think Bernie Williams might be someone who is overrated because he was on the Yankees and won titles.
(JKGaucho from DC)
There's absolutely no evidence that being on particular team helps you in the BBWAA voting. Cardinals, Giants and Yankees are overrepresented in the Hall of Fame because the Hall wasn't bright enough to do away with the Veterans Committee once it had served the purpose of catching early-baseball players and the backlog of qualified 20th-century candidates.
Bernie Williams is a Hall of Famer to me, although I admit I may be too close to it. Postseason performance does matter, and it matters more now in the era of three-level playoffs. Williams, Mariano Rivera, John Smoltz and Curt Schilling are just a few of the players whose resumes are stronger than a JAWS-flavored analysis would indicate. (Joe Sheehan)
2008-01-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Joe! Love the work you do. During class, I just think about baseball (which helps explain my grades last semester). Can you answer this question for me- John Smoltz: Hall of Famer or not?
(Jonathan from Springfield, MO)
Yes. A stronger version of Curt Schilling's case, with a little Dennis Eckersley thrown in. (Joe Sheehan)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2009-10-16 13:00:00NLCS Game Two/ALCS Game OneA year out of date, but compare the peak scores of these then-active pitchers:

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=7451

Roger Clemens: 83.9
Greg Maddux 86/0
Randy Johnson 77.3
Pedro Martinez 68.8
Curt Schilling 65.9
Mike Mussina 64.3
Tom Glavine 63.7
John Smoltz 58.5
Avg HoF SP 67.2
(Jay Jaffe)
 

PITCHf/x Pitcher Profile

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