Biographical

Portrait of Joel Hanrahan

Joel Hanrahan P

Player Cards | Team Audit | Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years G IP W L SV ERA WARP
14 362 404.7 22 18 100 3.85 4.1
Birth Date10-6-1981
Height6' 4"
Weight255 lbs
Age37 years, 5 months, 13 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
2007 WAS MLB 12 11 51.0 5 3 0 59 38 43 9 97 10.4 6.7 1.6 7.6 35% .318 1.90 6.01 6.00 124 6.96 144.1 -0.7
2008 WAS MLB 69 0 84.3 6 3 9 73 42 93 9 95 7.8 4.5 1.0 9.9 44% .292 1.36 3.81 3.95 102 4.48 95.5 0.8
2009 PIT 0 33 0 31.3 0 1 0 23 20 37 0 96 6.6 5.7 0.0 10.6 28% .303 1.37 2.70 1.72 87 3.28 70.4 0.7
2009 WAS 0 34 0 32.7 1 3 5 50 14 35 3 95 13.8 3.9 0.8 9.6 46% .431 1.96 3.57 7.71 94 3.84 82.4 0.5
2010 PIT MLB 72 0 69.7 4 1 6 58 26 100 6 94 7.5 3.4 0.8 12.9 43% .329 1.21 2.64 3.62 75 2.95 66.6 1.6
2011 PIT MLB 70 0 68.7 1 4 40 56 16 61 1 98 7.3 2.1 0.1 8.0 54% .282 1.05 2.14 1.83 80 3.01 70.0 1.4
2012 PIT MLB 63 0 59.7 5 2 36 40 36 67 8 95 6.0 5.4 1.2 10.1 40% .225 1.27 4.49 2.72 108 4.97 113.9 -0.1
2013 BOS MLB 9 0 7.3 0 1 4 10 6 5 4 104 12.3 7.4 4.9 6.1 38% .273 2.18 11.25 9.82 119 5.63 134.9 -0.1
2009 TOT MLB 67 0 64.0 1 4 5 73 34 72 3 96 10.3 4.8 0.4 10.1 38% .378 1.67 3.14 4.78 91 3.57 76.5 1.2
CareerMLB36211404.7221810036919844140968.24.40.99.842%.3051.403.733.85974.2392.74.1

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg LG G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
2000 GRF Rk PIO 12 11 55.0 3 1 0 49 23 40 4 8.0 3.8 0.7 6.5 0% -.672 1.31 4.81 4.75 0 0.00 0.0
2001 WNC A SAL 27 26 144.0 9 11 0 136 55 116 13 8.5 3.4 0.8 7.3 0% -.668 1.33 3.97 3.38 0 0.00 0.0
2002 VRO A+ FSL 25 25 143.7 10 6 0 129 51 139 11 8.1 3.2 0.7 8.7 0% .298 1.25 3.53 4.20 0 0.00 0.0
2002 JAX AA SOU 3 3 11.0 1 1 0 15 7 10 2 12.3 5.7 1.6 8.2 0% .361 2.00 5.47 10.64 0 0.00 0.0
2003 JAX AA SOU 23 23 133.3 10 4 0 117 53 130 5 7.9 3.6 0.3 8.8 0% .310 1.28 2.96 2.43 0 0.00 0.0
2003 LVG AAA PCL 5 5 25.0 1 2 0 36 20 13 2 13.0 7.2 0.7 4.7 0% .366 2.24 5.94 10.08 0 0.00 0.0
2004 LVG AAA PCL 25 22 119.3 7 7 0 128 75 97 22 9.7 5.7 1.7 7.3 0% .299 1.70 6.34 5.05 0 0.00 0.0
2005 VRO A+ FSL 5 5 21.3 1 0 0 25 11 25 5 112 10.6 4.6 2.1 10.6 8% .300 1.69 5.70 5.92 0 0.00 0.0
2005 JAX AA SOU 23 21 111.7 9 8 0 118 55 102 17 65 9.5 4.4 1.4 8.2 44% .313 1.55 5.00 4.91 0 0.00 0.0
2006 JAX AA SOU 12 12 66.0 7 2 0 49 38 67 4 72 6.7 5.2 0.5 9.1 42% .188 1.32 3.59 2.59 0 0.00 0.0
2006 LVG AAA PCL 14 14 74.1 4 3 0 70 39 46 7 105 8.5 4.7 0.9 5.6 41% .268 1.47 5.02 4.49 0 0.00 0.0
2007 WAS MLB NL 12 11 51.0 5 3 0 59 38 43 9 97 10.4 6.7 1.6 7.6 35% .318 1.90 6.01 6.00 124 6.96 144.1
2007 COH AAA INT 15 15 75.3 5 4 0 65 36 71 10 95 7.8 4.3 1.2 8.5 40% .259 1.34 4.60 3.71 0 0.00 0.0
2008 WAS MLB NL 69 0 84.3 6 3 9 73 42 93 9 95 7.8 4.5 1.0 9.9 44% .292 1.36 3.81 3.95 102 4.48 95.5
2009 PIT MLB NL 33 0 31.3 0 1 0 23 20 37 0 96 6.6 5.7 0.0 10.6 28% .303 1.37 2.70 1.72 87 3.28 70.4
2009 WAS MLB NL 34 0 32.7 1 3 5 50 14 35 3 95 13.8 3.9 0.8 9.6 46% .431 1.96 3.57 7.71 94 3.84 82.4
2010 PIT MLB NL 72 0 69.7 4 1 6 58 26 100 6 94 7.5 3.4 0.8 12.9 43% .329 1.21 2.64 3.62 75 2.95 66.6
2010 BRD A+ FSL 2 0 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 13.5 0% .000 0.00 0.43 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
2011 PIT MLB NL 70 0 68.7 1 4 40 56 16 61 1 98 7.3 2.1 0.1 8.0 54% .282 1.05 2.14 1.83 80 3.01 70.0
2012 PIT MLB NL 63 0 59.7 5 2 36 40 36 67 8 95 6.0 5.4 1.2 10.1 40% .225 1.27 4.49 2.72 108 4.97 113.9
2013 BOS MLB AL 9 0 7.3 0 1 4 10 6 5 4 104 12.3 7.4 4.9 6.1 38% .273 2.18 11.25 9.82 119 5.63 134.9
2013 PAW AAA INT 2 0 2.0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 102 9.0 4.5 4.5 4.5 29% .167 1.50 10.20 9.00 0 0.00 0.0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr%
2008 1441 0.4837 0.4566 0.7310 0.6413 0.2836 0.8501 0.4787 0.2690
2009 1187 0.4659 0.4457 0.6938 0.6004 0.3107 0.8404 0.4467 0.3062
2010 1171 0.4893 0.4500 0.6831 0.5777 0.3278 0.8218 0.4490 0.3169
2011 1023 0.5142 0.4692 0.7625 0.6540 0.2736 0.8314 0.5882 0.2375
2012 997 0.4824 0.4604 0.7015 0.6611 0.2733 0.8176 0.4397 0.2985
2013 159 0.4277 0.3962 0.7778 0.6029 0.2418 0.8293 0.6818 0.2222
Career59780.48480.45430.71590.62520.29310.83350.48420.2841

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2014-05-02 - 60-DL - - Right Elbow Recovery From Surgery Tommy John Surgery and Flexor Tendon Repair and Bone Chips 2013-05-16 -
2013-05-07 2013-10-31 60-DL 177 130 Right Elbow Surgery Tommy John Surgery and Flexor Tendon Repair and Bone Chips 2013-05-16 -
2013-04-14 2013-04-30 15-DL 16 15 Right Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2012-04-16 2012-04-21 DTD 5 4 - Thigh Strain Hamstring - -
2010-03-26 2010-04-12 15-DL 17 6 Right Elbow Strain Flexor Pronator Mass -
2010-02-17 2010-02-25 Camp 8 0 Right Elbow Strain Flexor Pronator Mass - -
2010-01-15 2010-01-15 Off 0 0 Right Elbow Tightness -
2009-09-16 2009-09-27 DTD 11 10 Right Elbow Soreness -
2007-04-24 2007-05-28 Minors 34 0 Groin Strain -
2004-09-01 2004-10-12 DTD 41 31 Right Shoulder Fatigue -
2004-05-23 2004-06-03 Minors 11 0 Right Shoulder Stiffness - -
2004-02-26 2004-02-28 Camp 2 0 Right Shoulder Inflammation -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2015 DET $
2014 DET $
2013 BOS $7,040,000
2012 PIT $4,100,000
2011 PIT $1,400,000
2010 PIT $453,000
2009 WAS $420,000
2008 WAS $400,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
6 yrPrevious$13,813,000
6 yrTotal$13,813,000

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
7 y 43 dReynolds Sports Management1 year (2015)

Details
  • 1 year (2015). Re-signed by Detroit as a free agent 11/14/14 (minor-league contract). Salary of $1M in majors. May earn additional $2.5M in performance bonuses. May opt out of contract if not on Major League roster 4/30/15 or 6/5/15. Released by Detroit 3/4/15.
  • 1 year/$1M (2014). Signed by Detroit as a free agent 5/2/14. May earn additional $2M in performance bonuses.
  • 1 year/$7.04M (2013). Signed by Boston 1/18/13 (avoided arbitration).
  • 1 year/$4.1M (2012). Re-signed by Pittsburgh 1/16/12 (avoided arbitration). Performance bonuses: $10,000 each for 40, 45 games finished. $15,000 each for 50, 60 GF. Acquired by Boston in trade from Pittsburgh 12/26/12.
  • 1 year/$1.4M (2011). Re-signed by Pittsburgh 1/18/11 (avoided arbitration).
  • 1 year/$0.453M (2010). Re-signed by Pittsburgh 3/2/10.
  • 1 year/$0.42M (2009). Re-signed by Washington 2/14/09. Acquired by Pittsburgh in trade from Washington 6/30/09.
  • 1 year/$0.4M (2008). Re-signed by Washington 1/25/08.
  • 1 year (2007). Signed as a free agent 11/06. Contract purchased 11/06. Re-signed 2/07.
  • Drafted 2002 (2-57). $0.615M signing bonus.

2019 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
Weighted Mean?????0.0?00?.0000.000.00?0.00.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index )

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2015 Joel Hanrahan signed a $1 million deal with the Tigers last May while recovering from Tommy John surgery. He basically earned money to remain injured, which sounds kinkier than it actually was, but in doing so he was the only Tigers closer not to blow a save.
2014 Hanrahan's acquisition went about as well as Andrew Bailey's in 2012, as the closer hit the disabled list a couple of times before permanent residence in early May en route to Tommy John surgery. The obvious irony is that Hanrahan was picked up because Bailey's health was in question. When fit, Hanrahan is great—that's why the Sox acquired him to begin with, you know. In his 229 innings with the Pirates, he posted a 2.59 ERA and struck out 265 batters. Even a limited post-surgery version of that pitcher could help a bullpen once he's available.
2013 Boston acquired Hanrahan in December to fill the ninth-inning hole left by Papelbon’s departure and Bailey’s durability woes. Hanrahan boasts an impressive strikeout rate and, in 2012, an impressive walk rate, in a really bad way. In the trade’s aftermath, Pittsburgh pitching coach Ray Searage suggested the control woes stemmed from a foot injury, some slight mechanical inconsistencies, and decreased save opportunities. If he's right about all of that —and if Boston can avoid the last part—then the hard-throwing Hanrahan figures to be up to the task of nailing down the ninth and raising his free-agent stock in the process. But that's a lot to be right about.
2012 Nabbed from the Nationals when he was just a feral arm with a high-90s fastball, plus-slider, and career ERA in the fives, Hanrahan has developed into a very good reliever. He ended the 2011 season with 169 2/3 innings pitched as a Pirate, just a tick more than the 168 innings he pitched with the Nationals. The similarities disappear at the innings count since Hanrahan has walked 32 fewer batters with the Pirates and struck out 27 more. Therein lies the beauty of pitchers like Hanrahan. They don't always click, but the one out of every five or 10 that does makes it worth the hassle. That is the Pirates philosophy on relievers in a sentence.
2011 Hanrahan had an outstanding season in 2010, consistently blowing hitters away with a fastball that reached 97-98 mph. His performance was especially impressive in light of the end-of-2009 elbow problems that persisted into 2010 and caused him to start the season on the disabled list. Hanrahan also has a plus slider, and the only time he really got into trouble last season was at those times when he would rely more on the breaking ball at the expense of the heater. Hanrahan lost the closer's job twice with the Nationals in 2009, but the change of scenery has suited him well. He enters spring training as the favorite to serve as the stopper, though Evan Meek will be a strong competitor for the role.
2010 Hanrahan got off to an awful start with the Nationals last season, and was twice removed from the closer's role, a job he qualified for solely due to the fact that he was breathing and somebody's going to get opportunities to protect leads, even a team that had them as infrequently as the Nats. Traded to the Pirates on June 30, the change of scenery was beneficial to Hanrahan, as he was able to relax, cut down on his walks and homers allowed, and avoid continued spontaneous combustion. He has an outstanding sinker that he throws in the low 90s and a good slider; in an odd turn of events, he could wind up closing again while Capps takes his place in Washington.
2009 The Nationals' most pleasant surprise of the season. We had by and large given up on him last year ("a junkballer, having lost the plus stuff he had years ago with the Dodgers to injuries"), but lo and behold, he found it again in the bullpen, showing up in camp with a 96-mph fastball and a hard-biting slider. He earned a spot on the team by compiling one of the most impressive lines of anyone last spring: 13 IP, 2 H, 2 BB, 15 K, no runs. When Rauch was traded, Hanrahan took over as closer the rest of the way and performed credibly; the job is now his to lose this year.
2008 Say this for a Hanrahan start-stuff happens; strikeouts, walks, homers, hits, runs . . . few areas of a scorecard remain untouched. He's a junkballer, having lost the plus stuff he had years ago with the Dodgers to injuries. He probably would have gotten the call earlier last year if not for a pulled groin that cost him a month. If he's going to stick, it may have to be in the pen.
2007 This 2000 second round pick reached Las Vegas late in 2003 and spent all of 2004 there while getting bombed like a groom-to-be. He then slid back down the ladder while wrestling with control problems and shoulder weakness. Though still walking too many hitters, Hanrahan otherwise pitched well enough at Jacksonville to earn a return to Vegas; he survived the stint but didn`t miss many bats. Unable to justify a spot for him on the big league roster, the Dodgers let him depart as a six-year minor league free agent; he signed a big league deal with the Nationals in early November, ensuring he`ll never summer in Vegas again.
2006 Promoted to Vegas after excelling at Jacksonville in 2003, Hanrahan bombed like your cousin and his card-counting `system.` Not faring much better there in 2004, he fell as low as Vero Beach before getting back to Jax, struggling with his control all the way. At this point, Billingsley and Broxton have lapped him. And in this pitching-rich system, there are more coming up behind them.
2005 Hanrahan's control deserted him in 2004, and he ended up getting hit pretty hard as a result. He was once highly touted, but his performance record is going in the wrong direction pretty fast. He's going to need to do everything right this year if he wants to have a shot at a serious major league career. That means not walking people, making batters miss, and not working into bad counts that result in cookie service.
2004 Hanrahan succeeds with exceptional command of four solid pitches. Like Derek Lowe, he keeps the ball down, inducing a high number of ground balls to supplement his strong peripheral numbers. He's not as good as dominating as Edwin Jackson, or as young as Greg Miller, but he's in the same ballpark in terms of promise. Hanrahan finished the season in Triple-A Las Vegas, where he was beaten like a red-headed stepchild. We like his chances, but he'll need to cut down on the walks to get through Triple-A this time around. Credit the Dodgers with finding a gem in that noted hotbed of high school pitching, Norwalk, Iowa.

BP Articles

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BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2013-11-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Seems like there are a number of older "proven closers" on the free agent market with only a handful of opportunities out there- Joaquin Benoit, Grant Balfour, Joe Nathan, Fernando Rodney, Edward Mujica not to mention the injury reclamation projects like Brian Wilson, Ryan Madson and Joel Hanrahan. With the success that the Cardinals had moving Edward Mujica back two innings and then doing the same with Trevor Rosenthal and Carlos Martinez in the playoffs, are the days of spending big on closers finally over? Does a team like the Cubs with no great in house solution and a smart front office take advantage of the oversaturated market or pass on all those guys?
(Scott from LA)
We'll continue to see a wide variety of approaches to how teams handle the late innings. On the one hand there is certainly something to the idea that there are people who can close and people who can't. But you'd be hard pressed to get a closer enough innings in a season to justify paying big for them (unless, like the Yankees, Phillies, Red Sox, etc. you simply have the money to spend). St. Louis has such a glut of arms they have no reason to go outside the org, but for many teams there simply aren't good reasons to limit a young, high ceiling arm to a closer role. I imagine the Cubs will look for a reasonably priced arm that they think can handle the job, rather than committing more money over multiple years. (Nick J. Faleris)
2013-04-11 13:00:00 (link to chat)What do you find to be the most irritating children's programming? I think I have an 80 "nails-on-chalkboard" tool...
(Wubbzy Wubbzy from Wow Wow)
I try to keep the TV on only moderately irritating child's programming if I'm keeping the TV to child's programming at all. I guess to answer your question though, I find the Joel Hanrahan giving up bombs to be about the most irritating child's programming I can imagine. (Matthew Kory)
2013-04-11 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hey, Matthew. I watched the first few innings of Dickey's start against the Sox from the Rogers Centre pressbox, and caused a considerable commotion, repeatedly smashing my head against the wall. Could you articulate the emotions you felt during that eventful opening frame? I'd tell you how I felt, but the expletives might offend some readers.
(Jonah Birenbaum from Ottawa)
I was expecting a pitcher's duel between Dickey and Jon Lester. Lester showed up at least. No, I thought that Dickey just didn't look right and then he tried to sneak a fastball past Will Middlebrooks with two on and two in and that didn't work. Still, I think it's just two bad starts and the chances are good Dickey figures this out and starts pitching more to what was expected of him.

And now I realize that I didn't answer your question. Elation is what I felt. It's wonderful to see the Red Sox play good baseball after the last few seasons, Joel Hanrahan's performance last night notwithstanding. Is that one word? Three words? Two and a half? The cold is numbing my brain. I need to go inside. (Matthew Kory)
2013-04-11 13:00:00 (link to chat)What do you think the chances of Axford and Madson getting their jobs back this year?
(johnny fastball from Washington State)
Axford isn't that good but the Brewers are low on options so it's quite possible. Madson just has to get healthy before you even think about putting him in the closer's role. Man, that guy is a walking (or not walking, depending on the day) poster-board for why giving big money to relievers isn't a good idea.

Joel Hanrahan is another. ARG! (Matthew Kory)
2012-04-12 14:00:00 (link to chat)Wow, so I'm not the only one w/ a Cespedes trade. I was offered Ricky Romero and Joel Hanrahan for Cespedes and Benoit. No brainer, right? Can always pluck an OF off waivers with decent pop (I hope).
(Jake from Springfield)
And the Cespedes train keeps rolling... Yeah, I'll go for that trade too. (Derek Carty)
2011-11-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)I hear that odds are Pads won't re-sign Heath Bell, but who else is giving him offers? Also, if he leaves San Diego, would that hurt his fantasy value (worse ballpark) or help (better team)?
(Noah Braun from San Diego)
I haven't heard of any concrete offers yet, but the Red Sox sound like they're going to be in on the remaining top closers (Bell and Ryan Madson). The Jays have been linked, but it seems more likely they'll go for a cheaper option. Other teams without clear closers like the Reds and Dodgers could also get involved. The Padres might still be the favorite, though, especially if the Red Sox go a different direction (i.e. Madson, a cheaper option to compete with Bard, or a trade for someone like Joel Hanrahan).

It would likely hurt his value if he did leave, but the extent would depend on where he ends up. Being on a better team is more important for starting pitchers than relievers, since offense has a smaller impact on save chances than it does on a starter's wins. The defense will of course matter for his ratios, but as long as he's a closer, he'll be a good bet for 30-35 saves, as he would be in San Diego. It's also worth noting that Bell saw a big drop in K rate this year (20% compared to 29% in 2009-2010), and Pecto actually inflates Ks by 10 percent over a neutral park. That's going to be something we'll really need to keep an eye on next year, but it's not enough to make me shy away from him if I need a closer in my leagues and he's affordable. (Derek Carty)
2011-06-29 13:30:00 (link to chat)Who are your favorite players to deal with, both past or present?
(Gerald from Savannah)
Geez. That's a tough one because there are so many good guys I have dealt with in 24 years of covering baseball. I hate to leave people out but some of my favorites would have to include Sean Casey, John Burkett, Jay Bell, Craig Wilson, Jason Schmidt, Michael Barrett from the past. From the present: Jason Bay, Cole Hamels, Carlos Pena, Scott Rolen, Brandon Phillips, Nyjer Morgan, Neil Walker, Joel Hanrahan, Adam Jones, Max Scherzer, Don Kelly, Chris Perez, Adam Dunn, Matt Capps, Torii Hunter, Kurt Suzuki, Ian Kinsler. (John Perrotto)
2011-02-02 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hello Ben Who gets more saves this year, Brad Lidge or Evan Meek? Thanks
(Ed from Cranford, NJ)
Lidge. Joel Hanrahan still seems to have the upper hand in Pittsburgh. (Ben Lindbergh)
2010-01-13 13:00:00 (link to chat)The Bucs are supposedly close to signing Dotel, Carrasco, and some mystery third reliever. Any idea who that is? And doesn't their bullpen suddenly look better?
(Bucsin07 from Pittsburgh)
Well, it would be hard for their bullpen to look worse. There's not a whole lot there right now beyond Joel Hanrahan and Evan Meek. (John Perrotto)
2009-04-28 13:00:00 (link to chat)Given Manny Acta's limited options, is he going to stick with Joel Hanrahan at closer after his awful start, or is he going to give a guy like Jason Bergmann a shot (a failed started with good stuff and health issues)?
(Peeig13 from The Second City)
This is my darkhorse for the Nationals' closer: Kip Wells. His results have never matched his stuff as a closer and a lot of times many pitchers who fit that profile wind up being good closers for a time. Eric Gagne is a prime example. (John Perrotto)
2008-02-27 13:00:00 (link to chat)You should take the over on the Nationals. You have them at 72, one down from last year's 73. With the upgrades in the OF (Nook/Langerhans for Lastings, Church/Snelling for Wily Mo/Dukes), Nick Johnson coming back, and an improved rotation (giving the innings that went to Jerome Williams, Joel Hanrahan, and Mike Bascik to Odalis Perez, John Patterson, John Lannan, Tyler Clippard, etc.) this team will be better.
(sbiel2 from Washington, DC)
You could be right there. One thing that PECOTA doesn't know, can't know yet, is just how all those playing time decisions will be made. Right now we have a best guess. As we see how the team sorts itself out, that prediction will be open to revision. (Steven Goldman)


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PITCHf/x Pitcher Profile

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