Biographical

Portrait of Tom Seaver

Tom Seaver PMets

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Career Summary
Years G IP W L SV ERA WARP
20 656 4783 311 205 1 2.86 115.1
Birth Date11-17-1944
Height6' 1"
Weight195 lbs
Age73 years, 11 months, 0 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
1967 NYN MLB 35 34 251.0 16 13 0 224 78 170 19 .265 99 8.0 2.8 0.7 6.1 50% .271 .255 1.20 3.28 2.76 96 3.44 91.3 2.9
1968 NYN MLB 36 35 278.0 16 12 1 224 48 205 15 .259 89 7.3 1.6 0.5 6.6 49% .257 .235 0.98 2.38 2.20 79 2.09 61.0 7.0
1969 NYN MLB 36 35 273.3 25 7 0 202 82 208 24 .259 98 6.7 2.7 0.8 6.8 51% .232 .230 1.04 3.25 2.21 85 2.79 68.3 6.3
1970 NYN MLB 37 36 290.7 18 12 0 230 83 283 21 .261 96 7.1 2.6 0.7 8.8 47% .267 .221 1.08 2.73 2.82 63 2.57 59.0 8.4
1971 NYN MLB 36 35 286.3 20 10 0 210 61 289 18 .258 97 6.6 1.9 0.6 9.1 48% .263 .208 0.95 2.02 1.76 52 2.00 51.2 8.9
1972 NYN MLB 35 35 262.0 21 12 0 215 77 249 23 .266 95 7.4 2.6 0.8 8.6 47% .272 .245 1.11 2.70 2.92 69 2.57 69.7 5.6
1973 NYN MLB 36 36 290.0 19 10 0 219 64 251 23 .260 97 6.8 2.0 0.7 7.8 48% .243 .214 0.98 2.54 2.08 60 2.06 48.7 9.5
1974 NYN MLB 32 32 236.0 11 11 0 199 75 201 19 .265 100 7.6 2.9 0.7 7.7 54% .274 .232 1.16 2.91 3.20 64 2.35 56.8 6.8
1975 NYN MLB 36 36 280.3 22 9 0 217 88 243 11 .264 95 7.0 2.8 0.4 7.8 52% .268 .215 1.09 2.37 2.38 62 2.19 51.8 8.8
1976 NYN MLB 35 34 271.0 14 11 0 211 77 235 14 .258 92 7.0 2.6 0.5 7.8 52% .263 .223 1.06 2.48 2.59 65 2.46 61.6 7.1
1977 CIN 0 20 20 165.3 14 3 0 120 38 124 12 .260 101 6.5 2.1 0.7 6.8 43% .231 .197 0.96 2.86 2.34 81 2.87 63.9 4.4
1977 NYN 0 13 13 96.0 7 3 0 79 28 72 7 .264 92 7.4 2.6 0.7 6.8 41% .254 .220 1.11 3.05 3.00 81 2.75 61.3 2.7
1978 CIN MLB 36 36 259.7 16 14 0 218 89 226 26 .258 103 7.6 3.1 0.9 7.8 49% .262 .245 1.18 3.21 2.88 73 2.63 63.4 6.7
1979 CIN MLB 32 32 215.0 16 6 0 187 61 131 16 .252 99 7.8 2.6 0.7 5.5 48% .259 .230 1.15 3.29 3.14 91 3.67 81.6 3.7
1980 CIN MLB 26 26 168.0 10 8 0 140 59 101 24 .254 103 7.5 3.2 1.3 5.4 49% .229 .242 1.18 4.46 3.64 100 3.26 76.0 3.4
1981 CIN MLB 23 23 166.3 14 2 0 120 66 87 10 .257 99 6.5 3.6 0.5 4.7 48% .218 .235 1.12 3.65 2.54 106 3.74 93.5 2.0
1982 CIN MLB 21 21 111.3 5 13 0 136 44 62 14 .257 102 11.0 3.6 1.1 5.0 61% .323 .299 1.62 4.53 5.50 103 3.68 85.6 1.8
1983 NYN MLB 34 34 231.0 9 14 0 201 86 135 18 .256 97 7.8 3.4 0.7 5.3 51% .255 .240 1.24 3.68 3.55 98 3.67 84.8 4.0
1984 CHA MLB 34 33 236.7 15 11 0 216 61 131 27 .267 99 8.2 2.3 1.0 5.0 50% .250 .245 1.17 3.92 3.95 90 2.65 62.0 6.7
1985 CHA MLB 35 33 238.7 16 11 0 223 69 134 22 .270 98 8.4 2.6 0.8 5.1 56% .264 .250 1.22 3.78 3.17 90 3.17 72.8 5.8
1986 BOS 0 16 16 104.3 5 7 0 114 29 72 8 .273 101 9.8 2.5 0.7 6.2 47% .313 .264 1.37 3.29 3.80 99 4.50 101.5 1.0
1986 CHA 0 12 12 72.0 2 6 0 66 27 31 9 .267 98 8.2 3.4 1.1 3.9 54% .241 .265 1.29 4.88 4.38 99 3.51 79.1 1.5
1977 TOT MLB 33 33 261.3 21 6 0 199 66 196 19 .262 98 6.9 2.3 0.7 6.8 42% .240 .206 1.01 2.93 2.58 81 2.82 63.0 7.1
1986 TOT MLB 28 28 176.3 7 13 0 180 56 103 17 .271 100 9.2 2.9 0.9 5.3 49% .283 .264 1.34 3.94 4.03 99 4.09 92.4 2.5
CareerMLB6566474783.03112051397113903640380.261977.52.60.76.850%.259.2341.123.082.86792.8067.7115.1

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR oppTAv PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP TAv WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
1967 NYN MLB 35 34 251.0 16 13 0 224 78 170 19 .265 99 8.0 2.8 0.7 6.1 50% .271 .255 1.20 3.28 2.76 96 3.44 91.3
1968 NYN MLB 36 35 278.0 16 12 1 224 48 205 15 .259 89 7.3 1.6 0.5 6.6 49% .257 .235 0.98 2.38 2.20 79 2.09 61.0
1969 NYN MLB 36 35 273.3 25 7 0 202 82 208 24 .259 98 6.7 2.7 0.8 6.8 51% .232 .230 1.04 3.25 2.21 85 2.79 68.3
1970 NYN MLB 37 36 290.7 18 12 0 230 83 283 21 .261 96 7.1 2.6 0.7 8.8 47% .267 .221 1.08 2.73 2.82 63 2.57 59.0
1971 NYN MLB 36 35 286.3 20 10 0 210 61 289 18 .258 97 6.6 1.9 0.6 9.1 48% .263 .208 0.95 2.02 1.76 52 2.00 51.2
1972 NYN MLB 35 35 262.0 21 12 0 215 77 249 23 .266 95 7.4 2.6 0.8 8.6 47% .272 .245 1.11 2.70 2.92 69 2.57 69.7
1973 NYN MLB 36 36 290.0 19 10 0 219 64 251 23 .260 97 6.8 2.0 0.7 7.8 48% .243 .214 0.98 2.54 2.08 60 2.06 48.7
1974 NYN MLB 32 32 236.0 11 11 0 199 75 201 19 .265 100 7.6 2.9 0.7 7.7 54% .274 .232 1.16 2.91 3.20 64 2.35 56.8
1975 NYN MLB 36 36 280.3 22 9 0 217 88 243 11 .264 95 7.0 2.8 0.4 7.8 52% .268 .215 1.09 2.37 2.38 62 2.19 51.8
1976 NYN MLB 35 34 271.0 14 11 0 211 77 235 14 .258 92 7.0 2.6 0.5 7.8 52% .263 .223 1.06 2.48 2.59 65 2.46 61.6
1977 CIN MLB 20 20 165.3 14 3 0 120 38 124 12 .260 101 6.5 2.1 0.7 6.8 43% .231 .197 0.96 2.86 2.34 81 2.87 63.9
1977 NYN MLB 13 13 96.0 7 3 0 79 28 72 7 .264 92 7.4 2.6 0.7 6.8 41% .254 .220 1.11 3.05 3.00 81 2.75 61.3
1978 CIN MLB 36 36 259.7 16 14 0 218 89 226 26 .258 103 7.6 3.1 0.9 7.8 49% .262 .245 1.18 3.21 2.88 73 2.63 63.4
1979 CIN MLB 32 32 215.0 16 6 0 187 61 131 16 .252 99 7.8 2.6 0.7 5.5 48% .259 .230 1.15 3.29 3.14 91 3.67 81.6
1980 CIN MLB 26 26 168.0 10 8 0 140 59 101 24 .254 103 7.5 3.2 1.3 5.4 49% .229 .242 1.18 4.46 3.64 100 3.26 76.0
1981 CIN MLB 23 23 166.3 14 2 0 120 66 87 10 .257 99 6.5 3.6 0.5 4.7 48% .218 .235 1.12 3.65 2.54 106 3.74 93.5
1982 CIN MLB 21 21 111.3 5 13 0 136 44 62 14 .257 102 11.0 3.6 1.1 5.0 61% .323 .299 1.62 4.53 5.50 103 3.68 85.6
1983 NYN MLB 34 34 231.0 9 14 0 201 86 135 18 .256 97 7.8 3.4 0.7 5.3 51% .255 .240 1.24 3.68 3.55 98 3.67 84.8
1984 CHA MLB 34 33 236.7 15 11 0 216 61 131 27 .267 99 8.2 2.3 1.0 5.0 50% .250 .245 1.17 3.92 3.95 90 2.65 62.0
1985 CHA MLB 35 33 238.7 16 11 0 223 69 134 22 .270 98 8.4 2.6 0.8 5.1 56% .264 .250 1.22 3.78 3.17 90 3.17 72.8
1986 BOS MLB 16 16 104.3 5 7 0 114 29 72 8 .273 101 9.8 2.5 0.7 6.2 47% .313 .264 1.37 3.29 3.80 99 4.50 101.5
1986 CHA MLB 12 12 72.0 2 6 0 66 27 31 9 .267 98 8.2 3.4 1.1 3.9 54% .241 .265 1.29 4.88 4.38 99 3.51 79.1

Plate Discipline

YEAR PITCHES ZONE_RT SWING_RT CONTACT_RT Z_SWING_RT O_SWING_RT Z_CONTACT_RT O_CONTACT_RT SW_STRK_RT

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
1986-05-18 1986-06-04 15-DL 17 15 Left Shoulder Inflammation - -
1980-07-01 1980-08-04 34 33 Left Shoulder Inflammation - -

Compensation

Year Team Salary

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status

Details
  • 1985
  • 1984
  • 1983
  • 1982
  • 1981
  • 1980
  • 1979
  • 1978
  • 1977
  • 1976.
  • 1 year/$0.136M (1975).
  • 1 year/$0.17M (1974). At signing, highest-paid pitcher in history.
  • 1 year/$0.14M (1973).
  • 1972
  • 1971
  • 1970
  • 1969
  • 1 year/$25,000 (1968)
  • 1 year/$13,500 (1967).
  • Signed by NY Mets 1966 as an amateur free agent. $50,000 signing bonus.

BP Annual Player Comments

No BP Book Comments have been found for this player.

BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Tom Seaver

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2015-07-23 17:00:00 (link to chat)Hey Mike what were your too 5 batting stances to imitate on the sand lot when you were a kid? You do the Julio Franco? The Andre Dawson straight leg? The Youkilis slide? The Craig counsel tower?...what should the kids be imitating from today's game?
(Classberg from Chicago)
I was a pitching guy when I was a kid. I loved emulating Fernando's crazy windup, Ron Guidry, and Tom Seaver. (Mike Gianella)
2013-06-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Tom Seaver or Bob Gibson?
(Scrapper from Still here)
Seaver for the rest of 2013; Gibson for 2014 and beyond (Paul Sporer)
2012-08-01 13:00:00 (link to chat)What's your favorite baseball memory?
(Ida from Pasadena, CA)
Thanks for your questions Ida, I live in the same town! Easily my greatest baseball memory is August 4, 1985, when Tom Seaver won his 300th game at a sold-out Yankee Stadium. It was Tom's first attempt at winning 300, and it could not have been scripted any better. I was traveling with the club during that period of my career, and had developed a great relationship with Seaver, so it meant even more to me. We got off the bus and a fan screamed out, "Hey Seaver, I hope you break your arm out there today" and Tom was right next to me. It broke the ice for him, as he let out his signature laugh and yelled back "Thanks for all your support." It was Old Timer's Day at Yankee Stadium and all the great Yankees were in attendance like DiMaggio. New York baseball fans, who loved him during all those years with the Mets, were incredibly supportive throughout the game, and the old Stadium was electric due to his quest and the great Yankee oldtimers in pre-game. Pitching coach Dave Duncan came out to the mound in the later innings, and was greeted with boos from the crowd, but Tony La Russa was never going to take out Seaver unless he had to, it was his game to lose. Tom threw a complete game at age 40, which was amazing in itself, and it was such a perfect moment. We had a closed clubhouse afterwards for a few minutes after the game as Tom composed himself, and his class came out as he had a game-used baseball from #300 for every member of the traveling party. The players had such immense respect for him as he was such a great mind and had such an amazing career. I'll likely never be able to duplicate that afternoon. (Dan Evans)
2011-01-05 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Jay! greetings from your southern-most follower (unless someone in the southern island of NZ is also out there?) Quick question, who would be the 5 charter members of the Baseball HoF if it was founded today?
(Guillermo from Montevideo, Uruguay)
Hey Guillermo! I think if you were to start today, Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Cy Young would be four of those five. I'm not sure who the fifth would be, though - probably another pitcher. Maybe Tom Seaver given that he had the highest vote percentage of all time. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-05-14 13:00:00 (link to chat)Who gets into the HOF on the first ballot with a higher percentage of votes, Mariano Rivera or Derek Jeter? I think even those voters with anti-closer bias are going to agree with Mo's inclusion, eh? Tough call.
(tommybones from brooklyn)
I don't think I'm going out too far on a limb by saying that either of these guys could challenge Tom Seaver's 98.84% record vote. The closer thing is more likely to work against Mo, but any writer who doesn't think both of those two are Hallworthy should be considered a fraud. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-10-20 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Steve, Thanks for chatting. Speaking of the 1969 Mets, they were, of course, led by Tom Seaver, whom they acquired by pulling his name out of a hat. How should have the commissioner handled the case to Seaver's rights back then?
(ripfan008 from Baltimore)
And we're back... The whole Seaver situation was kind of a joke, a crazy catch-22. The Braves made Seaver a #1 pick in 1966, but the contract was voided because USC had started its exhibition season by the time the deal went through - not that Seaver had played, although he had worked out with the team (IIRC). Simultaneously, the NCAA ruled Seaver ineligible because he had signed a pro contract. He had nowhere to go. Baseball's solution was a lottery for Seaver. The weird thing about it was that only three teams asked for a shot, the Mets, the Phillies, and the Indians. Oddly, the Braves quit on Seaver at that point. The contract should never have been voided in the first place... (Steven Goldman)
2008-02-28 14:00:00 (link to chat)Christina, great work over the offseason, as always. My question is about roster construction, and specifically the hitter/pitcher divide. It seems like it was just yesterday that we were mocking the Rockies and/or Don Baylor for taking 12 pitchers, but at least it was mildly defensible on the grounds that they needed extra arms to throw in Coors Field. Now we're at a point where almost everyone is at a 13/12 divide. What the heck happened, and what do you think are the chances of some squad going back to 15/10 simply by employing 2 good long men in the pen at all times?
(ElAngelo from New York, NY)
Baylor's mistake was that he made that choice for a post-season roster. While I would like to see more teams invest the roster space in observing one of Earl Weaver's rules and put their young starters in long relief roles, and thereby save themselves multiple spots sunk on multiple situational playthings in the pen, you could also save roster space by effectively committing to a four-man rotation that exploits the fact that we're in a world that doesn't have doubleheaders and a schedule that features plenty of off-days to reduce the fifth slot to a sometime thing. That might mean shorter starts for the front four, and it might not, but I think we're at a point where the industry has probably overcorrected, costing us the next Jack Morris or Tom Seaver.

You could also expand your roster by not resorting to Eck-style closer usage patterns--make the money pitcher for the endgame something more than a sundae's cherry, and you'll get more quality innings. Condition them to be Eck-style closers, and you're investing a roster spot on a single-purpose single-inning reliever, forcing you to commit to 11 at the outset, and making 12 seems plausible.

Now, to be fair to major league managers, managing pitching staffs involves anticipating a lot of different scenarios, not all of them happy, and committing resources in the form of those roster spots. But it can also mean not giving lineups the same depth of consideration, because you know you'll have nine guys out there, and beyond someone who can play the corners, someone who can play the outfield, and someone who can catch, you figure you're covered. It's not the way I look at the problem of in-game tactics or in-season operations, but I was reading Earl Weaver's books at an impressionable age. (Christina Kahrl)


BP Roundtables

DateRoundtable NameComment
2010-10-06 10:00:002010 Playoffs Day OneI can never let go of the fact that the Mets didn't protect Tom Seaver after '83 because they wanted to leave room for Ron Gardenhire on the roster. (Steven Goldman)
2009-10-15 17:00:002009 NLCS Game One (Phillies/Dodgers)Aaron W. (Kentucky): Re: Joe's question, in the '69 NLCS Niekro faced Tom Seaver. That's 264 post-69 wins for Niekro plus 254 for Seaver. 518 put together

Blast, I had half of it. Still, Joe said YOUNG starter. Knucksie doesn't count. Maybe there was a Spahn-Ford game in '57 or '58 that yields a pretty good total. (Steven Goldman)