Biographical

Portrait of Fred McGriff

Fred McGriff 1BRays

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Career Summary
Years PA AVG OBP SLG DRC+ WARP
22 10174 .284 .377 .509 131 36.6
Birth Date10-31-1963
Height6' 3"
Weight200 lbs
Age55 years, 3 months, 18 days
BatsL
ThrowsL
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

YEAR TEAM AGE G PA H 2B 3B HR BB SO HBP SB CS AVG OBP SLG DRC+ DRAA BRR FRAA BWARP
1986 TOR 22 3 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 .200 .200 .200 78 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0
1987 TOR 23 107 356 73 16 0 20 60 104 1 3 2 .247 .376 .505 121 9.5 0.0 -0.8 1.2
1988 TOR 24 154 623 151 35 4 34 79 149 4 6 1 .282 .376 .552 148 33.1 -0.4 2.9 4.5
1989 TOR 25 161 680 148 27 3 36 119 132 4 7 4 .269 .399 .525 157 43.9 -1.1 1.8 5.6
1990 TOR 26 153 658 167 21 1 35 94 108 2 5 3 .300 .400 .530 151 37.8 1.1 3.7 5.2
1991 SDN 27 153 642 147 19 1 31 105 135 2 4 1 .278 .396 .494 144 34.0 -5.5 -10.6 2.6
1992 SDN 28 152 632 152 30 4 35 96 108 1 8 6 .286 .394 .556 157 42.0 -4.2 -13.0 3.4
1993 ATL 29 68 291 79 18 1 19 34 51 1 1 0 .310 .392 .612 143 16.5 1.8 1.9 2.3
1993 SDN 29 83 349 83 11 1 18 42 55 1 4 3 .275 .361 .497 144 20.0 -0.6 -3.5 2.0
1994 ATL 30 113 478 135 25 1 34 50 76 1 7 3 .318 .389 .623 152 34.0 -1.0 -6.8 3.0
1995 ATL 31 144 604 148 27 1 27 65 99 5 3 6 .280 .361 .489 114 12.7 -1.6 -13.3 0.4
1996 ATL 32 159 691 182 37 1 28 68 116 2 7 3 .295 .365 .494 117 19.1 -5.9 -4.3 1.6
1997 ATL 33 152 641 156 25 1 22 68 112 4 5 0 .277 .356 .441 109 9.7 -2.0 -8.2 0.4
1998 TBA 34 151 649 160 33 0 19 79 118 2 7 2 .284 .371 .443 109 8.7 -5.3 -11.5 -0.3
1999 TBA 35 144 620 164 30 1 32 86 107 1 1 0 .310 .405 .552 133 30.3 -4.2 -6.0 2.4
2000 TBA 36 158 664 157 18 0 27 91 120 0 2 0 .277 .373 .452 115 18.0 -2.0 -32.0 -0.8
2001 CHN 37 49 201 48 7 2 12 26 37 3 0 1 .282 .383 .559 135 10.0 -1.5 -3.0 0.8
2001 TBA 37 97 385 109 18 0 19 40 69 0 1 1 .318 .387 .536 135 19.1 -1.9 3.6 2.5
2002 CHN 38 146 595 143 27 2 30 63 99 4 1 2 .273 .353 .505 121 18.2 -5.3 -12.5 0.7
2003 LAN 39 86 329 74 14 0 13 31 66 1 0 0 .249 .322 .428 100 1.0 -1.3 -8.7 -0.6
2004 TBA 40 27 81 13 3 0 2 9 19 0 0 0 .181 .272 .306 70 -2.9 0.2 -1.0 -0.3
Career24601017424904412449313051882397238.284.377.509131414.5-40.7-121.236.6

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G PA oppAVG oppOBP oppSLG BABIP BPF BRAA repLVL POS_ADJ DRC+ DRC+ SD FRAA BRR DRAA BWARP
1983 FLO A 33 141 .000 .000 .000 .385 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1983 KIN A+ 94 416 .000 .000 .000 .291 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1984 KNX AA 56 222 .000 .000 .000 .304 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1984 SYR AAA 70 266 .000 .000 .000 .314 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1985 SYR AAA 51 204 .000 .000 .000 .294 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1986 TOR MLB 3 5 .277 .354 .424 .333 97 -0.6 0.1 -0.1 78 14 0.1 0.0 -0.1 0.0
1986 SYR AAA 133 563 .000 .000 .000 .309 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
1987 TOR MLB 107 356 .266 .336 .430 .310 99 12.8 10.5 -6.7 121 9 -0.8 0.0 9.5 1.2
1988 TOR MLB 154 623 .261 .323 .392 .328 102 39.7 16.3 -10.3 148 10 2.9 -0.4 33.1 4.5
1989 TOR MLB 161 680 .262 .324 .388 .289 98 47.8 17.8 -11.4 157 7 1.8 -1.1 43.9 5.6
1990 TOR MLB 153 658 .262 .328 .393 .316 102 43.6 17.7 -11.3 151 9 3.7 1.1 37.8 5.2
1991 SDN MLB 153 642 .250 .315 .370 .314 102 36.7 17.4 -11.1 144 8 -10.6 -5.5 34.0 2.6
1992 SDN MLB 152 632 .252 .311 .370 .298 103 42.3 16.4 -10.5 157 14 -13.0 -4.2 42.0 3.4
1993 ATL MLB 68 291 .261 .321 .394 .323 100 24.8 8.3 -5.3 143 12 1.9 1.8 16.5 2.3
1993 SDN MLB 83 349 .266 .325 .402 .279 96 13.1 10.0 -6.4 144 12 -3.5 -0.6 20.0 2.0
1994 ATL MLB 113 478 .271 .334 .425 .319 101 33 14.5 -9.3 152 10 -6.8 -1.0 34.0 3.0
1995 ATL MLB 144 604 .267 .333 .416 .297 99 15.5 18.1 -11.6 114 10 -13.3 -1.6 12.7 0.4
1996 ATL MLB 159 691 .266 .330 .418 .323 98 20 21.4 -13.7 117 10 -4.3 -5.9 19.1 1.6
1997 ATL MLB 152 641 .261 .331 .408 .308 99 7.1 17.0 -12.1 109 7 -8.2 -2.0 9.7 0.4
1998 TBA MLB 151 649 .272 .336 .430 .327 94 17.7 17.7 -12.3 109 7 -11.5 -5.3 8.7 -0.3
1999 TBA MLB 144 620 .274 .343 .436 .335 97 45.3 17.3 -12.4 133 10 -6.0 -4.2 30.3 2.4
2000 TBA MLB 158 664 .271 .342 .435 .305 88 19 20.9 -13.3 115 10 -32.0 -2.0 18.0 -0.8
2001 CHN MLB 49 201 .263 .329 .435 .293 98 12 6.0 -3.8 135 7 -3.0 -1.5 10.0 0.8
2001 TBA MLB 97 385 .266 .332 .425 .350 96 22.3 11.5 -7.2 135 7 3.6 -1.9 19.1 2.5
2002 CHN MLB 146 595 .260 .331 .417 .283 101 24.6 17.1 -10.9 121 9 -12.5 -5.3 18.2 0.7
2003 LAN MLB 86 329 .266 .331 .428 .280 91 4.7 8.7 -6.1 100 10 -8.7 -1.3 1.0 -0.6
2003 VRO A+ 2 7 .000 .000 .000 .250 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
2004 TBA MLB 27 81 .259 .325 .401 .216 99 -5.1 2.4 -1.4 70 12 -1.0 0.2 -2.9 -0.3
2004 DUR AAA 7 26 .000 .000 .000 .286 0.0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Statistics For All Levels

Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
Year Team Lg PA AB R H 2B 3B HR TB RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG ISO SF SH
1983 FLO A 141 119 26 37 3 1 7 63 26 20 35 3 0 .311 .411 .529 .218 1 1
1983 KIN A+ 416 350 53 85 14 1 21 164 57 55 112 3 2 .243 .353 .469 .226 3 3
1984 SYR AAA 266 238 28 56 10 1 13 107 28 26 89 0 1 .235 .309 .450 .214 1 1
1984 KNX AA 222 189 29 47 13 2 9 91 25 29 55 0 2 .249 .352 .481 .233 0 0
1985 SYR AAA 204 176 19 40 8 2 5 67 20 23 53 0 0 .227 .328 .381 .153 1 1
1986 SYR AAA 563 468 69 121 23 4 19 209 74 83 119 0 3 .259 .375 .447 .188 0 0
1986 TOR MLB 5 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 .200 .200 .200 .000 0 0
1987 TOR MLB 356 295 58 73 16 0 20 149 43 60 104 3 2 .247 .376 .505 .258 0 0
1988 TOR MLB 623 536 100 151 35 4 34 296 82 79 149 6 1 .282 .376 .552 .271 4 0
1989 TOR MLB 680 551 98 148 27 3 36 289 92 119 132 7 4 .269 .399 .525 .256 5 1
1990 TOR MLB 658 557 91 167 21 1 35 295 88 94 108 5 3 .300 .400 .530 .230 4 1
1991 SDN MLB 642 528 84 147 19 1 31 261 106 105 135 4 1 .278 .396 .494 .216 7 0
1992 SDN MLB 632 531 79 152 30 4 35 295 104 96 108 8 6 .286 .394 .556 .269 4 0
1993 ATL MLB 291 255 59 79 18 1 19 156 55 34 51 1 0 .310 .392 .612 .302 1 0
1993 SDN MLB 349 302 52 83 11 1 18 150 46 42 55 4 3 .275 .361 .497 .222 4 0
1994 ATL MLB 478 424 81 135 25 1 34 264 94 50 76 7 3 .318 .389 .623 .304 3 0
1995 ATL MLB 604 528 85 148 27 1 27 258 93 65 99 3 6 .280 .361 .489 .208 6 0
1996 ATL MLB 691 617 81 182 37 1 28 305 107 68 116 7 3 .295 .365 .494 .199 4 0
1997 ATL MLB 641 564 77 156 25 1 22 249 97 68 112 5 0 .277 .356 .441 .165 5 0
1998 TBA MLB 649 564 73 160 33 0 19 250 81 79 118 7 2 .284 .371 .443 .160 4 0
1999 TBA MLB 620 529 75 164 30 1 32 292 104 86 107 1 0 .310 .405 .552 .242 4 0
2000 TBA MLB 664 566 82 157 18 0 27 256 106 91 120 2 0 .277 .373 .452 .175 7 0
2001 TBA MLB 385 343 40 109 18 0 19 184 61 40 69 1 1 .318 .387 .536 .219 2 0
2001 CHN MLB 201 170 27 48 7 2 12 95 41 26 37 0 1 .282 .383 .559 .276 2 0
2002 CHN MLB 595 523 67 143 27 2 30 264 103 63 99 1 2 .273 .353 .505 .231 5 0
2003 LAN MLB 329 297 32 74 14 0 13 127 40 31 66 0 0 .249 .322 .428 .178 0 0
2003 VRO A+ 7 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 .167 .286 .167 .000 0 0
2004 DUR AAA 26 21 4 5 0 0 1 8 4 5 6 0 0 .238 .385 .381 .143 0 0
2004 TBA MLB 81 72 7 13 3 0 2 22 7 9 19 0 0 .181 .272 .306 .125 0 0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr% CSAA

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2003-06-14 2003-08-22 60-DL 69 60 Right Groin Strain -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2003 LAN $3,750,000
2002 CHN $7,250,000
2001 TBA, CHN $6,500,000
2000 TBA $5,945,818
YearsDescriptionSalary
4 yrPrevious$23,445,818
4 yrTotal$23,445,818

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
16 y 9 dJim Krivacs

Details
  • 1 year (2004). Signed by Tampa Bay as a free agent 2/04 (minor-league contract). Contract purchased by Tampa Bay 5/04. DFA 7/04. Signed 7/04 (minor-league contract).
  • 1 year/$3.75M (2003). Signed by LA Dodgers as a free agent 12/02.
  • Chicago Cubs declined 2003 option 10/02 ($0.5M buyout).
  • Acquired by Chicago Cubs in trade from Tampa Bay 7/01. Chicago Cubs exercised $7.25M for 2002 option 11/01.

BP Annual Player Comments

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BP Articles

Click here to see articles tagged with Fred McGriff

BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2014-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)What is it going to take for Fred McGriff to be elected to the baseball Hall Of Fame? What are your thoughts and insights on his chances? Second question not related to the above question. How do you guys project Angels prospect Kaleb Cowart going forward, he had a slow year last season so how do the Angels see him in their organization going forward? Thanks again, Chris Hart
(chris hart from south georgia)
More Tom Emanski videos and a bigger dad hat. I'll bet McGriff comes up short because MVP voting is even dumber than HOF voting. (Jeff Moore)
2013-01-11 14:00:00 (link to chat)I know Carlos Delgado isn't up for election until 2015, but given that a comparable player (on another site) is Fred McGriff (though McGriff's JAWS socre is higher than Delgado's; 40.7 to 36.3, though their peaks are very close, off by 1 point, with McGriff's being higher), do you forecast that he'll experience a similar voting path McGriff is currently experiencing? Of course, their eligibility windows are different entities, and it may be somewhat like comparing apples to oranges, but the big link between the two is that their careers overlapped the PED era.
(Mike Shumka from Milton, Ontario)
Yeah, I don't see Delgado getting anywhere in the voting if McGriff doesn't. It doesn't help his cause that nothing he did after age 34 had much value, WAR-wise. (Jay Jaffe on the Hall of Fame)
2012-01-09 13:00:00 (link to chat)As an obvious Braves fan, what's the rational for Dale Murphy and Fred McGriff being left out of the Hall of Fame. I understand, although though don't completely agree with, the lack of dominance factor for McGriff, but he was one of the most consistent hitters in the 1990s. As for Murphy, he is being punished for the opposite, lack of consistency despite his dominance. It is hard to neglect the fact that Murphy was one of the top ten hitters of the 1980s, which should be reason enough to elect him. Sorry, I am not working with a lot of data here, but I wanted to here your rationale and opinion. Thanks again.
(UCBravesKing from Erlanger, KY)
Murphy's peak was high but short, and there was little in between his good years and his awful ones. We have him with six seasons of 5.0 WARP or more, while his seventh best is worth less than 2.0, and only three of them are worth between 1.0 and 2.0. McGriff has just three above 5.0, and six more between 2.0 and 3.0. First base is a position for MASHERS, and he just didn't fit that description for long enough. The average HOF 1B has a True Average of .320, and while the Crime Dog was at .317 or higher nine times, he's down in the .265-.285 range for almost as many. (Jay Jaffe's Hall of Fame Special)
2010-07-23 13:00:00 (link to chat)How about Fred McGriff? Big HR guy with no steroid taint.
(SIERAmist from Clean Coal Fantasyland, WV)
Unless he's added a few homers since December, what I wrote back then (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=9871) still applies:

For years now, there's been talk of the fact that with his 493 homers, McGriff might unseat Dave Kingman (442 homers) as the player with the highest total not to make the Hall of Fame. Jose Canseco (462 homers) has already erased the so-called "Kingman Line," but then his transgressions insured he'd never make Cooperstown anyway. There's bound to be a certain nostalgia among voters for McGriff, who hit the majority of his shots before the pharmaceutically-fueled assault on the single-season home-run record began, and an acknowledgment that the round-numbered milestone he fell short of means less today than it did a generation ago.

Even so, McGriff doesn't have a particularly strong case for Cooperstown. Despite the two home-run titles, he's well short of the Black Ink of a typical Hall of Famer (though that Jamesian metric fails to adjust for expansion). He never won an MVP award (his top single-season WARP total of 6.8 isn't quite MVP territory), and while he did place in the top 10 in the voting in six straight seasons (1989-1994), he only cracked the top five in 1993. JAWS-wise, that stretch of six-win seasons still isn't enough for him to measure up to the average Hall of Famer on peak score, and he's even further below the standard on career WARP. The shape of his JAWS line is very similar to that of Tony Perez (59.0/41.3/50.2), but that particular Doggie had five pennants, two rings, and a more famous dynasty to his name. The guess here is that he'll fall far short, but linger on the ballot for a long time. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)Jay, thanks for the chat. Tyler Kepner in yesterday's NYT handicapped the HOF choices, in which he made reference to stat-based criteria, but he remains confoundingly lukewarm on Tim Raines (in my opinion, the highest impact player on the ballot), yet high on Fred McGriff. While I agree with you that McGriff is not an overwhelming candidate (please don't tell Bill James, who loved him), he has a case, but so does Raines, of an order of magnitude several notches greater than McGriff. And Kepner continues the patronizing commentary on Bert Blyleven. You can tell where my vote would go, but I cannot understand the lukewarm response to Raines. When will these guys learn?
(BeplerP from New York, NY)
I don't know exactly how Kepner voted (or if he even has a ballot) but I think you're in danger of mistaking his opinion of those players' cases for his assessment of their chances in this year's voting, at least when it comes to Raines.

When will the voters learn? Some of them may never change their views on guys like Raines and Blyleven whom the statheads like us hold dear. The best we can hope for is that newer generations who come to the question with open minds can be swayed by the preponderance of evidence in their favor. (Jay Jaffe)
2010-01-06 13:00:00 (link to chat)I'd call this good news for Bert. I was worried he'd stagnate around 62%. do you have the % of the vote for Edgar, Raines and Barry? They don't have it on espn.com. Thanks.
(collins from greenville nc)
539 ballots, five blanks, Andre Dawson 420 (77.9%), Bert Blyleven 400 (74.2%), Roberto Alomar 397 (73.7%), Jack Morris 282 (52.3%), Barry Larkin 278 (51.6%), Lee Smith 255 (47.3%), Edgar Martinez 195 (36.2%), Tim Raines 164 (30.4%), Mark McGwire 128 (23.7%), Alan Trammell 121 (22.4%), Fred McGriff 116 (21.5%), Don Mattingly 87 (16.1%), Dave Parker 82 (15.2%), Dale Murphy 63 (11.7%), Harold Baines 33 (6.1%), Andres Galarraga 22 (4.1%), Robin Ventura 7 (1.3%), Ellis Burks 2 (0.4%), Eric Karros 2 (0.4%), Kevin Appier 1 (0.2%), Pat Hentgen 1 (0.2%), David Segui 1 (0.2%), Mike Jackson 0, Ray Lankford 0, Shane Reynolds 0, Todd Zeile 0.

Segui gets his vote. Baines remains on life support thanks to the persistence of a stubborn few. Karros receives more votes than he had All-Star appearances. (Jay Jaffe)
2009-08-04 14:00:00 (link to chat)Think Canseco is telling the truth when he says a juicer is already in the Hall of Fame?
(Greg from Des Moines)
My little brother was kidding me at the park a couple of months ago: "The thing about the steroids scandal is, Jose Canseco?--complete vindicated." Given how much the worm's turned on the perception front, do we really want to say he's not telling the truth? If there is one already in, that might be the right sort of tonic to those who on the one hand seem to noisily against certain players for the Hall, but then seem to be notably silent about Fred McGriff. And while it's easy to get overly worked up about slippery slopes, if McGriff's in and Rice is in but Keith Hernandez or Tim Raines isn't, is this really just "the Hall of People Who Didn't Use a Few of Our Least Favorite Substances, but Not All of Them, Insofar as We Know." (Christina Kahrl)
2009-03-30 18:30:00 (link to chat)Jim Rice - Hall of Famer?
(john from chicago)
Before I answer, let me acknowledge that (a) Jim Rice was my favorite player growing up, and (b) I'm a "big Hall" kind of guy.

With that context, I disagree with what seems to be the prevailing sabermetric opinion, including here at BP, that Rice was obviously unworthy as a HOF selection. I don't think he's a no-brainer Hall of Famer, but I think he has a legitimate argument.

Rice's case is obviously one built on peak value, not career length. Also, the argument has been that he is less valuable according to sabermetric models than how he was regarded at the time. His OBP, home park, double-play totals, and positional adjustments are counterbalanced by the notion that he was the most "feared" hitter or his day. But how do you actually assess how "feared" he was, and how that reputation played out in his peak value.

I actually did some work on this back when the election was on people's minds. Rice had 6 Top 10 finishes in the MVP voting.

Among players with exactly 6 Top 10 finishes, 11 are in the HOF, 6 are active or too recent, and only 4 are not in the Hall (Vern Stephens, Dave Parker, Andres Galarraga, Fred McGriff). Even among those with just 5 such finishes, the ratio is 17 HOF, 6 not HOF, 5 active. There's a reasonable case that players with Rice-like peaks get into the Hall about 2/3rd of the time.

Of course, all of Rice's Top 10 finishes were in fact Top 5 finishes. All of the players with 6 such rankings are in the Hall (4) or obviously qualified barring PED-externalities (Frank Thomas, Albert Pujols, A-Rod). Of those with exactly 5 Top 5 MVP years, only Pete Rose and Dave Parker aren't in the Hall or active.

Sorry for taking so much time to answer this one, but I think Rice looks better through contemporary views than through a modern analytical lens, and I don't think it's silly to consider that perspective. (Keith Woolner)
2008-12-15 13:00:00 (link to chat)Will, it seems that Teixeira will surely sign a long contract, maybe even 8 or 10 years. Does he seem like a good bet to provide solid value over the life of that contract, particularly the last couple seasons?
(Phil from NJ)
NFL.com ads on BP? That's a bit odd looking ...

Ok, it's impossible to project 10 years out. Three is tough. Without the PECOTA comps, I go to BRef. There, you start seeing comp names like Willie McCovey, Jeff Bagwell, Fred McGriff and if you want a downside, Glenn Davis. All are pretty good physical comps, so that's a plus.

McCovey was a HOFer and good until 37, with a nice peak through age-33, so getting those years of Teixeira cover most of an 8 year deal.

Bagwell has a similar career path with a bit steeper of a drop due to the shoulder. Still, if you'd signed him to a big deal at age-28, you wouldn't have been unhappy.

Davis had a HUGE dropoff and was out of the game at 32, so there's your worst-case.

It's McGriff who I think is most comparable. Really good through 31, then good enough to be an All-Star for four more years. Worth $20 million a year? Not for the whole contract, but you don't kick yourself for doing it. For Teixeira, I wonder if the off-field value holds as much as we think for Baltimore (where he could be a huge difference maker in a lineup with Markakis and Wieters) or for Washington (where they're gonna stink no matter what and he could end up A-Rodding by the middle of the deal). (Will Carroll)
2008-09-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)With the Jays on the noggin, who's going to be the first player into the HoF with a Blue Jays cap?
(Aaron from YYZ)
Rickey Henderson? Fred McGriff? Lyle Overbay? Maybe a successful VC campaign for Dave Stieb?

That's a stumper. I honestly don't know the answer. (Jay Jaffe)
2008-06-24 13:00:00 (link to chat)And don't forget the Yankees' own "Attorney General," Alberto Gonzalez! Now that I think of it, did you coin that one? Or maybe it was Pete Abe?
(G-MOTA from Bumpus, MA)
I think, like Fred McGriff, "The Crime Dog," that was an example of convergent evolution. I think Pete Abe and I started doing that at roughly the same time. With McGriff, I remember calling him the Crime Dog long before I saw it in the media anywhere, but I was 15 and not writing anywhere but my school paper, so I doubt it got much further than Mrs. Futterman's homeroom. It just must have been obvious to a number of people at the same time.

PS: I made up Mrs. Futterman, homeroom teacher/bondage freak. (Steven Goldman)


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