Biographical

Portrait of Francisco Cordero

Francisco Cordero PRangers

Rangers Player Cards | Rangers Team Audit | Rangers Depth Chart

Career Summary
Years G IP W L SV ERA WARP
18 800 824.7 47 53 329 3.38 12.1
Birth Date5-11-1975
Height6' 3"
Weight245 lbs
Age44 years, 6 months, 6 days
BatsR
ThrowsR
WARP Summary

MLB Statistics

Historical (past-seasons) WARP is now based on DRA..
cFIP and DRA are not available on a by-team basis and display as zeroes(0). See TOT line for season totals of these stats.
Multiple stints are are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA- WARP
1999 DET MLB 20 0 19.0 2 2 0 19 18 19 2 98 9.0 8.5 0.9 9.0 0% .327 1.95 5.40 3.32 111 5.90 114.8 -0.1
2000 TEX MLB 56 0 77.3 1 2 0 87 48 49 11 92 10.1 5.6 1.3 5.7 0% .300 1.75 5.82 5.35 125 7.68 147.8 -1.6
2001 TEX MLB 3 0 2.3 0 1 0 3 2 1 0 92 11.6 7.7 0.0 3.9 0% .333 2.14 4.80 3.86 110 5.30 109.8 0.0
2002 TEX MLB 39 0 45.3 2 0 10 33 13 41 2 108 6.6 2.6 0.4 8.1 0% .261 1.01 2.81 1.79 96 3.94 84.5 0.7
2003 TEX MLB 73 0 82.7 5 8 15 70 38 90 4 108 7.6 4.1 0.4 9.8 0% .303 1.31 2.99 2.94 81 3.40 71.3 1.8
2004 TEX MLB 67 0 71.7 3 4 49 60 32 79 1 109 7.5 4.0 0.1 9.9 0% .309 1.28 2.51 2.13 76 2.90 59.9 2.1
2005 TEX MLB 69 0 69.0 3 1 37 61 30 79 5 108 8.0 3.9 0.7 10.3 0% .304 1.32 3.17 3.39 80 3.13 67.3 1.8
2006 MIL 0 28 0 26.7 3 1 16 20 16 30 2 95 6.8 5.4 0.7 10.1 0% .281 1.35 3.63 1.69 79 3.06 62.4 0.8
2006 TEX 0 49 0 48.7 7 4 6 49 16 54 5 109 9.1 3.0 0.9 10.0 0% .333 1.34 3.47 4.81 83 3.39 69.1 1.2
2007 MIL MLB 66 0 63.3 0 4 44 52 18 86 4 106 7.4 2.6 0.6 12.2 0% .316 1.11 2.17 2.98 60 1.95 40.3 2.4
2008 CIN MLB 72 0 70.3 5 4 34 61 38 78 6 100 7.8 4.9 0.8 10.0 0% .302 1.41 3.74 3.33 94 3.96 84.5 1.1
2009 CIN MLB 68 0 66.7 2 6 39 58 30 58 2 96 7.8 4.1 0.3 7.8 0% .301 1.32 3.05 2.16 93 3.81 81.8 1.1
2010 CIN MLB 75 0 72.7 6 5 40 68 36 59 5 97 8.4 4.5 0.6 7.3 0% .294 1.43 3.94 3.84 105 4.48 101.2 0.3
2011 CIN MLB 68 0 69.7 5 3 37 49 22 42 6 102 6.3 2.8 0.8 5.4 0% .214 1.02 3.98 2.45 100 3.99 92.7 0.6
2012 HOU 0 6 0 5.0 0 3 0 13 4 5 2 107 23.4 7.2 3.6 9.0 0% .550 3.40 9.33 19.80 122 4.35 99.8 0.0
2012 TOR 0 41 0 34.3 3 5 2 48 14 26 7 106 12.6 3.7 1.8 6.8 0% .366 1.81 5.49 5.77 120 5.49 125.9 -0.3
2006 TOT MLB 77 0 75.3 10 5 22 69 32 84 7 104 8.2 3.8 0.8 10.0 0% .000 1.34 3.53 3.70 81 3.28 66.7 2.0
2012 TOT MLB 47 0 39.3 3 8 2 61 18 31 9 106 14.0 4.1 2.1 7.1 0% .000 2.01 5.97 7.55 120 5.35 122.6 -0.3
CareerMLB8000824.74753329751375796641028.24.10.78.744%.3001.373.643.38934.0285.012.1

Statistics for All Levels

'opp' stats - Quality of opponents faced - have been moved and are available only as OPP_QUAL in the Statistics reports now.
Minor league stats are currently shownClick to hide.
YEAR Team Lg LG G GS IP W L SV H BB SO HR PPF H/9 BB/9 HR/9 K/9 GB% BABIP WHIP FIP ERA cFIP DRA DRA-
1995 FAY A SAL 4 4 20.0 0 3 0 26 12 19 1 11.7 5.4 0.5 8.6 0% .000 1.90 3.84 6.30 0 0.00 0.0
1995 JAM A- NYP 15 14 88.0 4 7 0 96 37 54 3 9.8 3.8 0.3 5.5 0% .000 1.51 3.93 5.22 0 0.00 0.0
1996 FAY A SAL 2 1 7.0 0 0 0 2 6 7 0 2.6 7.7 0.0 9.0 0% .000 1.14 3.87 2.57 0 0.00 0.0
1996 JAM A- NYP 2 2 11.0 0 0 0 5 2 10 0 4.1 1.6 0.0 8.2 0% .000 0.64 2.32 0.82 0 0.00 0.0
1997 WMI A MDW 50 0 54.3 6 1 35 36 15 67 2 6.0 2.5 0.3 11.1 0% .274 0.94 2.29 0.99 0 0.00 0.0
1998 LAK A+ FSL 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0% .000 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 0.00 0.0
1998 JAX AA SOU 17 0 16.7 1 1 8 19 9 18 1 10.2 4.9 0.5 9.7 0% -.643 1.68 3.72 4.85 0 0.00 0.0
1999 DET MLB AL 20 0 19.0 2 2 0 19 18 19 2 98 9.0 8.5 0.9 9.0 0% .327 1.95 5.40 3.32 111 5.90 114.8
1999 JAX AA SOU 47 0 52.3 4 1 27 35 22 58 3 6.0 3.8 0.5 10.0 0% -.386 1.09 3.13 1.38 0 0.00 0.0
2000 TEX MLB AL 56 0 77.3 1 2 0 87 48 49 11 92 10.1 5.6 1.3 5.7 0% .300 1.75 5.82 5.35 125 7.68 147.8
2000 OKL AAA PCL 3 0 4.3 0 0 1 7 3 5 0 14.7 6.3 0.0 10.5 0% -.875 2.33 3.34 4.19 0 0.00 0.0
2000 Esc Wnt DWL 11 0 8.3 0 0 0 17 12 9 0 18.4 13.0 0.0 9.8 0% -.810 3.49 5.90 11.93 0 0.00 0.0
2001 TEX MLB AL 3 0 2.3 0 1 0 3 2 1 0 92 11.6 7.7 0.0 3.9 0% .333 2.14 4.80 3.86 110 5.30 109.8
2001 OKL AAA PCL 12 0 15.3 0 1 6 8 3 20 0 4.7 1.8 0.0 11.8 0% -.348 0.72 1.52 0.59 0 0.00 0.0
2002 TEX MLB AL 39 0 45.3 2 0 10 33 13 41 2 108 6.6 2.6 0.4 8.1 0% .261 1.01 2.81 1.79 96 3.94 84.5
2002 OKL AAA PCL 11 1 12.3 0 2 2 15 7 21 2 11.0 5.1 1.5 15.4 0% .419 1.79 4.10 5.85 0 0.00 0.0
2003 TEX MLB AL 73 0 82.7 5 8 15 70 38 90 4 108 7.6 4.1 0.4 9.8 0% .303 1.31 2.99 2.94 81 3.40 71.3
2004 TEX MLB AL 67 0 71.7 3 4 49 60 32 79 1 109 7.5 4.0 0.1 9.9 0% .309 1.28 2.51 2.13 76 2.90 59.9
2005 TEX MLB AL 69 0 69.0 3 1 37 61 30 79 5 108 8.0 3.9 0.7 10.3 0% .304 1.32 3.17 3.39 80 3.13 67.3
2006 MIL MLB NL 28 0 26.7 3 1 16 20 16 30 2 95 6.8 5.4 0.7 10.1 0% .281 1.35 3.63 1.69 79 3.06 62.4
2006 TEX MLB AL 49 0 48.7 7 4 6 49 16 54 5 109 9.1 3.0 0.9 10.0 0% .333 1.34 3.47 4.81 83 3.39 69.1
2007 MIL MLB NL 66 0 63.3 0 4 44 52 18 86 4 106 7.4 2.6 0.6 12.2 0% .316 1.11 2.17 2.98 60 1.95 40.3
2008 CIN MLB NL 72 0 70.3 5 4 34 61 38 78 6 100 7.8 4.9 0.8 10.0 0% .302 1.41 3.74 3.33 94 3.96 84.5
2009 CIN MLB NL 68 0 66.7 2 6 39 58 30 58 2 96 7.8 4.1 0.3 7.8 0% .301 1.32 3.05 2.16 93 3.81 81.8
2010 CIN MLB NL 75 0 72.7 6 5 40 68 36 59 5 97 8.4 4.5 0.6 7.3 0% .294 1.43 3.94 3.84 105 4.48 101.2
2011 CIN MLB NL 68 0 69.7 5 3 37 49 22 42 6 102 6.3 2.8 0.8 5.4 0% .214 1.02 3.98 2.45 100 3.99 92.7
2012 HOU MLB NL 6 0 5.0 0 3 0 13 4 5 2 107 23.4 7.2 3.6 9.0 0% .550 3.40 9.33 19.80 122 4.35 99.8
2012 TOR MLB AL 41 0 34.3 3 5 2 48 14 26 7 106 12.6 3.7 1.8 6.8 0% .366 1.81 5.49 5.77 120 5.49 125.9
2012 ESC Wnt DWL 3 0 2.0 0 0 0 3 4 2 0 13.5 18.0 0.0 9.0 0% .429 3.50 7.13 13.50 0 0.00 0.0

Plate Discipline

YEAR Pits Zone% Swing% Contact% Z-Swing% O-Swing% Z-Contact% O-Contact% SwStr%
2008 1206 0.3922 0.4287 0.6867 0.6300 0.2988 0.7852 0.5525 0.3133
2009 1047 0.4585 0.4441 0.7419 0.6375 0.2804 0.8203 0.5912 0.2581
2010 1269 0.4539 0.4413 0.7821 0.6319 0.2828 0.8599 0.6378 0.2179
2011 1079 0.4106 0.4291 0.7408 0.6366 0.2846 0.8369 0.5912 0.2592
2012 729 0.4582 0.4280 0.7692 0.6377 0.2506 0.8169 0.6667 0.2308
Career53300.43270.43470.74250.63430.28190.82470.60390.2575

Injury History  —  No longer being updated

Last Update: 12/31/2014 23:59 ET

Date On Date Off Transaction Days Games Side Body Part Injury Severity Surgery Date Reaggravation
2013-04-04 2013-04-04 FA 0 0 Left Shoulder Surgery - -
2013-04-04 2013-04-04 On-Alr 0 0 Right Knee Surgery Debridement 2013-04-04 -
2012-09-01 2012-09-01 On-Alr 0 0 Right Shoulder Soreness - -
2012-08-02 2012-09-10 15-DL 39 34 Right Sprain Ligament - -
2012-07-27 2012-07-29 DTD 2 2 - Soreness - -
2008-09-26 2008-09-28 DTD 2 2 Right Foot Surgery Microfracture 2008-09-26
2008-06-10 2008-06-12 DTD 2 2 General Medical Respiratory Flu -
2005-03-11 2005-03-28 Camp 17 0 Right Shoulder Soreness -
2002-06-25 2002-07-27 15-DL 32 27 Right Shoulder Strain -
2001-06-26 2001-10-07 60-DL 103 87 Low Back Stress Fracture -
2001-03-28 2001-06-22 60-DL 86 70 Low Back Stress Fracture -
1998-07-28 1998-09-05 Minors 39 0 Right Elbow Surgery Stress Fracture 1998-07-29 -

Compensation

Year Team Salary
2013 HOU $
2012 TOR $4,500,000
2011 CIN $12,125,000
2010 CIN $12,125,000
2009 CIN $12,125,000
2008 CIN $8,500,000
2007 MIL $5,400,000
2006 TEX $4,000,000
2005 TEX $3,750,000
2004 TEX $2,000,000
2003 TEX $900,000
2002 TEX $900,000
2001 TEX $277,500
2000 TEX $200,000
YearsDescriptionSalary
13 yrPrevious$66,802,500
13 yrTotal$66,802,500

 

Service TimeAgentContract Status
12 y 46 dBean Stringfellow1 year (2014)

Details
  • 1 year (2014). Signed by Boston as a free agent 2/15/14 (minor-league contract). Salary of $1M in majors. Released by Boston 3/29/14.
  • 1 year/$4.5M (2012). Signed by Toronto as a free agent 2/1/12. Acquired by Houston in trade from Toronto 7/20/12. Released by Houston 9/10/12.
  • 4 years/$46M (2008-11). $0.5M signing bonus. Signed by Cincinnati as a free agent 11/28/07. 08:$8.5M, 09:$12M, 10:$12M, 11:$12M, 12:$12M club option, $1M buyout. Full no-trade clause 2008-09. Limited no-trade after 2009. Cincinnati declined 2012 option 10/31/11.
  • 2 years/$8.5M (2005-06), plus 2007 club option. Signed extension with Texas 7/04. $0.25M signing bonus. 05:$3.75M, 06:$4M, 07:$5M club option. 2007 option may increase based on 2006 games finished. Award bonuses. Acquired by Milwaukee in trade from Texas 7/06. Milwaukee exercised 2007 option at $5.4M 10/06.
  • 1 year/$2M (2004). Re-signed 1/04 (avoided arbitration). $0.15M in performance bonuses.
  • 1 year/$0.9M (2003) Re-signed 2/03 (avoided arbitration, $1.175M-$0.775M).

2019 Preseason Forecast

Last Update: 1/27/2017 12:35 ET

PCT W L SV G GS IP H BB SO HR BABIP WHIP ERA DRA VORP WARP
Weighted Mean?????0.0?00?.0000.000.00?0.00.0

Comparable Players (Similarity Index )

Rank Score Name Year Run Average Trend

BP Annual Player Comments

YearComment
2013 Cordero failed as a closer in two different countries last year and looked overwhelmed by the task of adapting his repertoire to his lessened velocity. He ended the season with shoulder problems, so he may have been pitching in pain all season long. That will be the hope (along with hopes that he'll be fully recovered) of whatever team takes a chance on him as a free agent this year. As bad as he looked, he'll be lucky to get a major-league contract with incentives. While he has the mental makeup teams want in pressure situations, he has let left-handers on base at a .362 clip in his career, so expectations that he can be more than a role-player should be kept in check.
2012 To paraphrase Pierre Trudeau, the essential ingredient of free agency is timing; Cordero had it once, getting a four-year, $45 million deal after 2007. Unfortunately, that set him up for serial spurning during this winter's stopperpocalypse, when it seemed like half the closers in baseball were free agents and all of them were getting deals before Cordero did. That's in part because he's no longer the same pitcher, relying heavily on his slider and change to make up for flagging velocity mirrored in a strikeout rate that has plummeted to 15 percent, less than half what it was in his salad days in Milwaukee. If ever simple save totals were supposed to represent quality you'd put a price on, Cordero would have gotten serious money for his 327 career saves; as we go to press, he hasn't, reflecting the smarter industry he's struggling to survive in.
2011 Corderoís SIERA rose for the third consecutive season, as further erosion in his skills left him dependent on a continued ability to suppress home runs on fly balls to maintain any semblance of value. The Dominican hasnít lost any velocity since his heyday, but his plummeting strikeout rate has made him much more contact-oriented. Since that elevated contact rate hasnít been accompanied by an increased incidence of ground balls, the current Cordero is more likely to get himself into trouble and less likely to get himself out of it. He is no longer what you would look for in a closer, but since heís still being paid like one, heíll continue to hold the job. The Reds are only on the hook for one more season, after which theyíll consider a $1 million buyout a bargain to rid themselves of a rapidly depreciating asset.
2010 Itís a shame that it was a buyerís market for closers this past offseason, because the Reds should have been selling on Cordero. By ERA and save percentage, Cordero had one of his finest seasons in 2009, but he saw a sharp drop in his strikeout rate, was very lucky on home runs (he allowed just two as a minuscule 2.1 percent of his fly balls left the park), and his line-drive rate has been on a steady upward trend over the last few seasons. Add in that heíll be 35 in May and is the second highest-paid Red in 2010 ($500,000 behind Aaron Harang) and under contract for another $12 million in 2011, and now is the time for the Reds to sell.
2009 While most of Cordero's peripherals have been pretty steady over the years, his walk rate has fluctuated, sometimes violently. The surprising thing is that these fluctuations have seldom signaled a substantial change in his performance levelófew players have picked up more than two walks per nine innings from one season to the next with less tangible effect. Cordero is a functional closer, whose save conversion rate tends to be on the low side of acceptable. He may not fully reward Wayne Krivsky's decision to outbid the Brewers for his services prior to last season over the full course of his four-year contract (plus a 2012 club option), but Walt Jocketty can shrug it off as something that wasn't his call.
2008 Cordero had no trouble staying in the groove he found after arriving from Texas in 2006. He dominated hitters with his high-90s heat, posting career-best strikeout and walk rates; among NL closers only Takashi Saito had a better K/BB ratio, and among relievers with 60 or more innings pitched, only Juan Cruz and Carlos Marmol struck out more men per nine innings. Cordero expressed a desire to return, and the Brewers bid competitively, but he wound up taking a four-year, $46 million deal with the Reds. Those looking for sour grapes in small sample sizes can take heart: as a Brewer, Cordero put up a 1.08 ERA in Miller Park, 5.40 elsewhere.
2007 Don`t let the high ERA in Texas fool you; park effects, bad defense, and very strong peripherals argue it should have been about a run lower. After arriving in Milwaukee, Cordero stepped in as closer, allowed one run in his first 23 2/3 innings despite control problems, and was promptly rewarded after the season by having his option picked up for the low, low price of $5.4 million. That`s a bit on the steep side, but he`s been a reliable reliever for six years running, and he`ll keep Derrick Turnbow away from save situations. Ask a Brewer fan how much that`s worth in white-knuckle currency.
2006 Cordero battled a shoulder injury in spring training, but delivered on the first year of his two-year, $8 million contract. His ratios were almost an exact repeat of 2004-a remarkable feat for a reliever-with the only difference being a slightly higher home run rate. His contract has a clause that increases the value of his 2007 option year from $5 to $6 million if he`s still the team`s closer. Have we mentioned that modern bullpen management is archaic, arbitrary, and costs teams wins by misallocating talent and cash? Case in point: the extra million it`s likely to cost the Rangers.
2005 Very tough all year long, throwing gas by stunned batters unable to catch up with his high heat. Ran out of gas down the stretch and gave up a home run Sept. 29; this would normally be an unremarkable event, except it was the only homer he allowed all season. The Rangers signed Cordero and his ridiculous slider to a two-year, $8 million deal in July, avoiding arbitration. Between Cordero, K-Rod and the A's stable of young, power arms, AL West late innings should be a pitching clinic in '05.
2004 On the face of it, it seemed like a gross mismanagement of resources for the Rangers to spend $4.5 million on Proven CloserTM Ugueth Urbina when they had the 100-mph arm of Cordero ready to take over the role. But that ignores the inflated value attached to the Proven CloserTM throughout MLB front offices. When John Hart was able to convert Urbina into a top-notch package of prospects at mid-season, it turned out to be money well spent. Meanwhile, Cordero's still here, still cheap, and still throws 100 mph. The closer role looks to be his for real this time, but stranger things have happened.
2003 It took four months and a few amusing auditions (Hideki Irabu?), but the Rangers found themselves a closer. Recovered from the lower back stress fracture that cost him his 2001, Cordero finally made good on the promise he showed in the Tigers organization before coming over in the Juan Gonzalez trade. He found his command and boosted his K/BB ratio from a dismal 1:1 in 2000 to an outstanding 3:1 last year. He may not put up a 1.79 ERA again, but he should be the anchor the bullpen was missing in 2002, even if itís not in the 9th inning role just yetóheís lost his closer job for now with Ugueth Urbinaís signing.
2002 It was a lost season for Francisco Cordero, twice sidelined with stress fractures in his lower back. Despite the injuries, the Rangers believe that he will eventually assume a setup role and pump some of the gas thatís been missing in the bullpen. Cordero still has an option remaining, so heíll likely open the season as a RedHawk so he can rebuild arm strength and hunt for his command, which has always been his bugaboo.
2001 Here's the next exhibit in the plundering of Motown. Thereís actually a lot here not to like, despite the kind of velocity that you donít see very often. Francisco Cordero throws hard, but like a lot of fireballers, he canít always control that velocity within the strike zone. So he walks a few guys, patient hitters work the count on him, and he has to take a little off the fastball to throw a strike. The result can occasionally cause neck strain for Cordero and the fans. If he can improve his control just 10-15%, that could translate into great success as a closer. Of course, you could have said the same for thousands of ex-pitchers who never made the bigs at all.
2000 Cordero has been the Tigersí closer-in-waiting since 1997, but a pair of stress fractures just above the elbow stalled his development. He finally had definitive surgery to correct the problem, then had a breakthrough year. For someone who has had his name in bold print for so long, heís still very young, a full year younger than Matt Anderson. He throws nearly as hard, with more movement on his fastball, but unlike Anderson, he has already learned to adjust to failure. Included in the Gonzalez trade, he adds to the deep and nasty Texas pen.
1999 He was major-league closer material a year ago, but he kept hitting the DL with elbow problems and then was shelved for the season with a stress fracture in his shoulder. Heís still very young and quite capable of a very strong comeback this year, but minor league closers - especially in the low minors - are historically bad bets. And his arm has to heal in two places first.
1998 Corderoís got good stuff and an extremely polished Rogenus Madduxia, or pitching gland as itís known to us laymen. If he can stay healthy, he can be in the majors for a September callup this year. Itíll probably take him about a month to get used to the new level.

BP Articles

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BP Chats

DateQuestionAnswer
2013-04-16 20:00:00 (link to chat)How do I value Addison Reed if I just started a dynasty rebuild? I know closers should be the first thing to go in a rebuild, but I can't help but believe he's relatively stable and likely to help me when I compete again in 2-3 years. Thanks
(JoeTinker from Chicago)
Here is a list of all closers who recorded 25 or more saves in 2010: Brian Wilson (48), Heath Bell (47), Rafael Soriano (45), Joakim Soria (43), Matt Capps (42), Neftali Feliz (40), Francisco Cordero (40), Carlos Marmol (38), Billy Wagner (37), Jonathan Papelbon (37), Kevin Gregg (37), Mariano Rivera (33), David Aardsma (31), Juan Oviedo (30), Bobby Jenks (27), Ryan Franklin (27), Brad Lidge (27), Jose Valverde (26), Francisco Rodriguez (25) and Andrew Bailey (25). (Bret Sayre)
2011-03-17 13:00:00 (link to chat)Who do you think the first closer to lose his job will be?
(mef from Brooklyn, NY)
There's still some jobs that aren't totally decided yet, and most guys who have to wait this long to claim the gig usually have a pretty short leash. Among those who we know will start the year at closer, I've got to go with Fernando Rodney of the Angels, who's just not that good and has a few guys behind him, even with Scott Downs' injury. I particularly like Jordan Walden there.

Honorable mention goes to Francisco Cordero, who's declining and can't possibly fend off Aroldis Chapman all year. (Mike Petriello)
2010-06-10 13:00:00 (link to chat)Hi Marc I have been offered Francisco Cordero for either Chase Headley, Chris Young or Kelly Johnson. My closer was Trevor Hoffman and I also have Evan Meek. What do you think of the offer? Thanks
(Ed from Cranford, NJ)
I wouldn't give up Chris Young, but either Headley or Kelly Johnson would be fine. Johnson's slowed down a bit since April, but he has that park to help him, whereas Headley is more of a batting average guy with low power in a park that hurts both of those things. Headley may be your low-cost option here. (Marc Normandin)
2010-03-04 13:00:00 (link to chat)What is the likelihood Francisco Cordero gets dealt this year to a team where he lose his closer role?
(GBSimons from Waiting for Day's End)
I haven't heard any rumblings--that may be a question better suited for June, though it would be more useful to have an answer now. (Marc Normandin)
2010-02-17 16:00:00 (link to chat)Who is the first closer to lose his job that people might not expect?
(MarinerDan from SF)
Does Frank Francisco count as one people might not expect? Going higher, maybe Francisco Cordero? That last one is just a hunch. (Tommy Bennett)
2009-04-28 13:00:00 (link to chat)I've heard from a very credible source (i.e., front office) that the Yankees had a deal in place with the Reds: Francisco Cordero for Xavier Nady (killed by the Reds' owner). Should the Yankees revisit that trade and plug in a different name to help solve their bullpen issues? They could go Mets-style and us Cordero as the 8th inning guy.
(Waker from Brooklyn)
Well, that trade won't happen now with Nady's elbow one more hard throw from blowing out. It would have been a good trade for both teams, though. (John Perrotto)


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PITCHf/x Pitcher Profile

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